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Money, Blood and Revolution: How Darwin and the doctor of King Charles I could turn economics into a science by [George, Cooper]
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Money, Blood and Revolution: How Darwin and the doctor of King Charles I could turn economics into a science Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Length: 222 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"For those with an open mind his criticisms of the economics profession, and suggestions for new ways forward, will be extremely welcome"
- Philip Coggan, The Economist

"A fascinating new book...Recommended reading...A delightfully well-written new book"
--John Authers, FT

"Remarkable"
--Club des Vigilants

"A fascinating new book"
--John Authers, FT

About the Author

Dr George Cooper has worked for Goldman Sachs, Deutsche Bank, J.P. Morgan and BlueCrest Capital Management in both fund management and investment strategy roles.

George's first book, The Origin of Financial Crises, received critical acclaim for its clear explanation of the monetary policy errors leading up to the global financial crisis.

Prior to joining the City, George worked as a research scientist at Durham University.

He lives in London with his wife and two children.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1292 KB
  • Print Length: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Harriman House; 1st edition (7 Mar. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00I8KEDO8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #286,866 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Concise, clear, engaging...fantastic writing style. Additionally makes clear the major issues with the current state of affairs in economics, explains that state of affairs very clearly, and then proceeds to offer a new model for understanding the economy that seems clearly superior to me.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Like the author’s previous book ‘The Origins of Financial crises’ this is a wonderfully written and engaging book for its target audience - us ordinary mortals!
And it’s the perfect book for this election year to help us get to grips with competing economic ideologies - which the author describes with awesome clarity on a two dimensional plane.
And it’s full of sharp humour – as when he explains how the popularity of various economics ideas have ebbed and flowed like the ‘migrations of wildebeest on the East African Serengeti!’
And it contains the funniest joke of all time about economists. I’ll leave you to buy it for that one.
Enjoy
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In Money, Blood and Revolution, George Cooper diagnoses correctly what ails the modern economics profession: It is operating from within a flawed paradigm, unable to reconsider basic, long-internalised assumptions. Drawing on the insights of Thomas Kuhn on the origins of scientific revolutions through history, Cooper demonstrates convincingly that today's economic mainstream has reached a dead end and cannot advance through ever-more-complex equations and models. Rather, a fundamental re-imagining is required, something that Kuhn argued in his work was highly unlikely to emerge from within the profession itself. Either younger, rising stars or relative outsiders are more likely to lead the way forward from here, and Cooper explores some possible directions, including his idea for a 'circulatory' economics paradigm.

One major quibble I have with the book is its treatment of the Austrian Economic School, which Cooper claims does not have a robust framework for understanding the role of government in the economy. For those familiar with the Austrian School, this will come as a shock. Much Austrian School economic literature is written primarily about how government (or central bank) policies distort economic calculation, leading to resource misallocation and booms and busts far larger than would occur absent government interference in markets. Henry Hazlitt's classic 'Economics in One Lesson' is a prominent case in point. There are many others.

Cooper notes that Thomas Kuhn believed that scientific revolutions resulted in simpler rather than more complex frameworks for understanding natural phenomena. Thus the same should be true in the event of a new economics paradigm.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This brilliant book should be compulsory reading for politicians struggling to put our economy right. Professional economists will hate it because it shows how threadbare their science is. Against the background of scientific revolutions in astronomy, physiology, evolution and geo-tectonics, Cooper rejects the three axioms on which neoclassical economics is based, and puts forward a shift of view which could provide a better approach. He does not try to demonstrate their value by piling fact on fact; either you experience the Aha moment or you don't. This is not the end of the argument, as he leaves out ecological economics and its insight that the economy is constrained by the limits of the planet, but he has made a good start.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There is a lot of concentrated thought in this book, artfully hidden in a refreshingly small number of pages. He summarises four intellectual revolutions, explains the limitations of the various schools of economics, and finally proposes a fresh way to turn economics into a science. Capitalism makes wealth but also inequality, and taxation is necessary to reduce the inequality and get wealth back down to where it can be put to good use. I do not know if this is the right answer or not, but it is a great idea and well worth a read.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
George Cooper has managed to cut through ever-increasing layers of complexity, whereby competing economic schools of thought seek to explain away obvious discrepancies in their axioms, and make a simple but compelling argument for why Western economies have performed so well since the advent of democracy.
This is a hugely entertaining read for academics, practitioners, and laymen alike, although judging by the evidence George Cooper provides, the former will not easily be converted!
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