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Molloy by [Beckett, Samuel]
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Molloy Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Length: 252 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

Hearing this, you at once realise Beckett's crisp prose is ideally suited to the audiobook medium. In first person narration we hear Molloy is first seeking his mother, then, in the second section, being pursued himself by Moran, a private detective. Yes, we are on familiar Beckett territory, yet this early work raises not only questions of being and aloneness it is also richly comical. A great introduction to Beckett before venturing into his later, darker works. --Bukowski on Bukowski zine

Book Description

New edition of Molloy by Samuel Beckett, published for the first time by Faber with an introduction by Beckett scholar Shane Weller.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 728 KB
  • Print Length: 252 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0802151361
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (4 Oct. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009YM5IXE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #114,092 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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4.4 out of 5 stars
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the landmarks of Twentieth Century fiction and one of the most beautiful pieces of prose in either French or English.
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Molloy, the story of both a man travelling and a man following, who may or may not be the same person, was my first foray into the work of Beckett. Being familiar with the reputation, at least, of Waiting for God of and Beckett 's standing as an exponent of the Theatre of the Absurd I forewarned myself with the knowledge that Molloy might be a challenging read.

To my relief, reading Molloy was a thoroughly enjoyable experience. After a few pages I found my mind tuned in to Beckett 's flowing, circular narrative, which is often in the form of Molloy's circular, repetitive monologue. The introspective meanderings of Molloy, fixed on his bad leg, his bad memory, his inner voice and a troubled journey to see his mother, form the plot of the unusual but engaging first half of the book.

The second half of the book deals with an, at first, altogether different character. Again written in the same monologous style, with the reader now well and truly familiar with the style of prose, the central character becomes Moran, an agent - of what or whom is never made clear - sent to find Molloy. What Moran is to do with Molloy should he find him is never made clear, in fact, the cloudiness of the reason signals the deterioration of Moran's once meticulous being.

Moran's journey mirrors Molloy's in more ways than one, both having clear objectives - to find Molloy or, for Molloy, to find his mother - that slip away from them. Both men have difficult relationships with their close family that perhaps borders on cruelty, Moran with his son and Molloy with his mother.
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By Officer Dibble VINE VOICE on 3 July 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The literary equivalent of staring at a Mark Rothko canvas. It may be modern, absurd, surreal. The point may be that it was written as a reaction to something, to break new ground, written with passionate motives to push the boundaries. But there has got to be some talent that goes with it.

Page after page after page after page after page after page after page after page after page of counting pebbles in your pocket and sucking them is simply tedious to read. And if I keep writing pebble after pebble after page after pebble after page after pebble...guess what everyone? It becomes tedious too. And it's not only tedious, it's talentless.

Groundbreaking? The first time yes, but after that it's a one-trick pony.

Mr Beckett was a very decent, brave chap as well as highly intelligent and multilingual. But I'm not reviewing the person, I'm reviewing this pretentious, tedious, vacuous tripe. Eventually, I read the book not because I enjoyed it, appreciated it or felt taken to a new literary plane but because I was intimidated by the intelligentsia who conned me into believing the emperor had new clothes.
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Format: Paperback
Most readers come to Samuel Beckett through a reading of one of his famous plays. 'Waiting For Godot' in particular is a set text in many schools. The irony of this is that most of these readers go no further than the relatively approachable dramatic works, and so remain unaware of the range and difficulty of Beckett's achievements in prose. Where to start with the latter?

'Molloy', composed during the same period as 'Godot', is actually Beckett's fifth novel, after 'Dream of Fair To Middling Women' (written in 1932 but not published until 1993), 'Murphy' (1938), 'Watt' (1941-45, published 1953) and 'Mercier and Camier' (written in French from 1946 but not published until 1970 in French and in altered form in English in 1974). 'Molloy' (1951 in French) also forms the first part of Beckett's loose 'Trilogy' but does not need to be read in that form to be appreciated.

The reader who comes to 'Molloy' without any other preparation will encounter difficulties, but should persist. Beckett has little interest in the conventional presentation of narrative and plot: 'Molloy' hangs together it seems by the sheer force of will of its characters as embodied in their speaking voices. Those voices are sometimes confused, sometimes infuriatingly repetitive or obsessive. Meaning emerges cumulatively.

The novel is divided into two halves, which suggests a structure based on both repetition and mirroring. Each presents the story of a man - Molloy and Moran respectively - engaged on a journey: in Molloy's case, to visit his mother; in Moran's, to find Molloy. So far, so simple. But in both cases the task proves almost impossible to complete.
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Format: Paperback
This is the first novel I've read of Beckett, and although at first it wasn't easy to get into the mindset of the book, by the end I felt transformed by his writing. His brutally honest and brazen prose is at times heartfelt and serene, but it is within these two contrasting folds of beautiful and ugly aspects of his characters, where his power seems to come from. In one moment we are empathetic towards a character, and then suddenly we see an ugly truth beneath the surface, which forces us to reassess and rebalance our opinion.

The journey that both central characters take, Molloy in search of his mother, and Moran in search of Molloy, creates an almost circular narrative to events, and the reasons and implications of each character finally meeting up with the person they are after is never made clear, and likewise not achieved in any case by the end of the book. And so we are left where we began, even if somewhat in tune with the ridiculousness and inert pointlessness of time itself, and by the end the characters are left perhaps feeling that way, that a journey is as pointless as its end.
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