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Mob Rules Import

4.6 out of 5 stars 76 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (25 Oct. 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000002KMY
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 195,751 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Continuing pretty much where Heaven and Hell left off, Mob Rules is wider in scope than its predecessor, has less to prove, and even sees the return of the classic Sabbath curveball (E5150 being this album's Planet Caravan). Turn up the Night is as intense and brutal as Neon Knights; The Sign of the Southern Cross and Falling off the Edge of the World are from the same loud-quiet-loud school as Die Young, Children of the Sea and Heaven and Hell. Ultimately, this album is marginally less satisfying than its predecessor, but still towers over everything any of its perpetrators have done since.

This 2010 remaster is a must-have, featuring extras that I personally crawled over hot coals to get over the years - in particular the live version of Die Young that appeared as the b-side to The Mob Rules single and the full Live at Hammersmith CD that I spent a small fortune personally importing on release. All are outstanding - Live at Hammersmith has an energy and edge that I find lacking from Live Evil - as well as a setlist featuring more Dio era material. Die Young, along with final extra The Mob Rules demo, is raw, raucous and unpolished - and is all the more exciting for that. As with Heaven & Hell (Deluxe Edition), the 2010 remaster is quieter than the 2004 Sanctuary release, however this is easily solved by just turning up the volume.

Now all they need to do is unearth recordings of the Heaven and Hell rehearsals featuring Ozzy and I can die a happy man!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As I already mentioned in my review of the new Deluxe Edition of "Heaven And Hell", this new mastering also retains the dynamic range of the original recording quite nicely (some might complain about it not being loud enough compared to other remasterings, but that is indeed a good thing - just use your volume knob to make it louder).

Compared to the original mastering on the Warner Bros. CD for the US market, this new mastering does not quite sound as good, but it is still a good mastering and the second best available option in my opinion (if you love this album you owe it to yourself to track down an original Warner Bros. US pressing of this CD).

The greatest part of this new Deluxe Edition is the 2nd disc which features the rare Rhino Handmade CD release "Live at Hammersmith" from a few years ago (the concert was recorded around New Year's Eve/Day 1981/1982). This bonus disc is a 1:1 digital clone of that Rhino Handmade release (which is long out of print and quite expensive on the secondary market). Now you can get it for a low price together with a decent mastering of "Mob Rules".

By the way, the mastering of the bonus live disc is also decent and still has some dynamics left. It is in my opinion the best available live recording of Dio era Black Sabbath, both from a performance point of view as well as from a mix/sound quality point of view. I like it better than "Live Evil".
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Unlike the 'Heaven and Hell' deluxe edition,this is a more than worthy reissue of an album that was always in the shadow of its illustrious predecesor.

Disc 1 : The original album remastered,Fantastic album with several tracks that easily held their own with the previous album,namely the title track,the magnificent 'Voodoo' and the best,IMHO,track they recorded 'Sign Of The Southern Cross'.As with the other reissue,i cannot tell any major difference from previous remaster,other than the decrease in volume.Two bonus tracks added are an unremarkable 'die young' from the Mob Rules 12' single and a superb version of 'Mob Rules' which is arguably better than that which appeared on the final album.

Disc 2 : the dogs dangly bits,the long craved 'Live At Hammersmith' from 1981 14 superb,heavy Sabbath moments,which are generally superior to those found on 'Live Evil' which sadly had the life sucked out of them when it was (over) produced,this is Sabbath the way they were meant to be heard,that it includes several tracks that never made 'Live Evil' is all the better,I would imagine those that paid over the odds for the Rhino ltd edition set may be a tad aggrieved.

Packaging : as mentioned in other review,basic,nothing spectacular.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The studio side has nothing new on offer, although the bonus tracks are interesting, a live version of "Die Young" and the original take of the titletrack Mob Rules. In the wake of two new albums, "Heaven and Hell" and "Mob Rules" the refreshed band, nowfronting new singer Ronnie James Dio, and a new drummer Vinnie Appice undertook a world tour, from which already a live album was taken "Live Evil" (read upside down) which also was the death toll on this line up. From that same tour but mainly recorded far earlier in Londen on december 31, 1981 plus january 1982, comes the material on the second disc. The sound is fresh and clear, the playing solid. A few tracks are new, compared to Live Evil but mainly the setlist is the same. A welcome edition to the worn out other live album as mentioned.
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Format: Audio CD
... in my humble opinion, of course!

This record, the second Sabbath album to feature Ronnie James Dio on lead vocals, brings out the best in both the singer and the band. The collaboration was a very controversial one at the time, with Ozzy having forged his own path with Blizzard of Ozz the fanbase polarised into pro and anti-Dio camps. The situation was not helped with the departure of original drummer Bill Ward, leaving just Iommi and Butler of the classic line-up. Vinnie Appice was recruited to fill the drum stool, and the band headed off to the studio, once again with Martin Birch in the producer's chair. Those who could not accept anyone other than Ozzy to front Sabbath however, missed out on this superb album.

As well as above-average regular Metal, as heard on the lead-off track 'Turn Up The Night', and 'The Mob Rules', there are more off-the-wall moments, such as the slow-burning 'Sign Of The Southern Cross', leading into the eerie synth-based intrumental 'E5150'. Side two (as it was on the vinyl) started on a lighter note, with 'Country Girl', more in the vein of the previous album 'Heaven and Hell', and is followed by 'Slipping Away', featuring excellent guitar/bass interplay from Iommi and Butler. Both tracks are built on superb riffs which was Iommi's stock in trade.

The album's real highpoint is 'Falling Off The Edge Of The World'. Once again it starts off quiet, and smoulders menacingly before the fast bit kicks in. They don't make them like this any more; a classic example of light and shade with Dio in top form, one minute singing softly, then roaring out the heavy part and all the while making it all seem so easy.

The final track is 'Over and Over', an old-fashioned Metal ballad with a searing Iommi solo to play us out.
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