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Mist in the Mirror Audio Download – Unabridged

3.8 out of 5 stars 103 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 6 hours and 6 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 28 Jun. 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008FPV45C
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Harris TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 3 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having been deprived of a new Susan Hill ghost story at Christmas 2011 I turned to "Mist in the Mirror" which I had on the shelf but hadn't read before. Like The Small Hand, The Woman In Black and The Man in the Picture it's a fairly short book, at 180 pages, almost more of a long short story than a (modern length) novel, but I think that suits the genre.

The atmosphere is, as other reviewers have noted, excellent, evoking a world of fog, cobbles and open fires. As a pedant I would point out though that it isn't Victorian - the main action must, I think, be set in the 1920s (a car is mentioned: there are references to someone who fought in France). The story is told around 40 years later, making the framing scenes actually 1960s or even 70s. But that's just to quibble.

be that as it may. The book concerns Sir James Monmouth, an eminent judge who was brought up from the age of five by a mysterious "guardian" abroad. On returning to London after 20 years wandering in the East, he sets out to trace the elusive adventurer Conrad Vane. This search - against which he is strongly advised by all manner of people - leads him to secrets about his own background, of which he was previously completely ignorant. All this is set out in a manuscript which, at the start of the book, he passes to a young acquaintance.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very depressing book! I was reading it for my book club but gave up after a few chapters
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A real good old fashioned ghost story told in true Susan Hill style. The tale of gentleman James Monmouth, who on his return to England (after living abroad for most of his life), is keen to research the life of mysterious English explorer Conrad Vale who he has long admired. Throughout his research however, he starts to discover hints of his own long lost childhood in England and the clues are in the ghostly visions that have been apparent to him since he stepped off the ship. SH's descriptions are so brilliantly executed, never rambling and always relevant. The chill of a London winter and the dismal courts and yards of the metropolis are so vividly described you can almost breathe in the sights and sounds. Wouldn't say that the story is as good as The Woman in Black, but most beautifully written all the same. The sort of book you would want to curl up and read on a cold winters night.
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Format: Paperback
The novel begins with the arrival of James Monmouth to England after spending most of his life travelling abroad. He is passionate about starting work on a biography of his idol and fellow explorer, Conrad Vane – but soon realises the man is connected with sinister occurrences.

On the plus side, this is a very atmospheric ghost story with an intriguing premise and passages which are genuinely chilling, without being sensationalist. The various settings are richly described and the characters are vividly drawn and almost Dickensian. However, the pace of the novel seemed off, as the beginning felt a lot more intriguing and fast paced but the middle and end were a lot slower, with lengthy descriptions of Pyre and Kittiscar, and very little new information about Vane.

I found the conclusion very disappointing and unsatisfactory, with too much left unanswered. What bad deeds had Vane committed? What was the nature of the curse, and of Vane’s dabblings in the occult? What circumstances surrounded the boy’s death? How was he connected to old Mr Quincebridge? Why was Vane exiled abroad? What happened to James’ parents? Who is Old Nan, and the woman behind the curtain? What relation is Miss Monmouth to James? Who is the mysterious ‘Guardian’? (For most of the novel I thought that the Guardian would turn out to be Vane, who had stolen him from his parents… but there was no such exciting twist.)

I loved The Woman in Black: there was a solid explanation for the appearance of the ghost and an ending which shocks, and I’d expected the same here. The novel had a lot of potential but sadly didn’t deliver any of the surprises, shocks or thrills that I’d hoped for.
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Format: Paperback
The first Susan Hill book I ever read was the Woman in Black. Her talent for gripping the reader from the word go is, in my opinion, unrivalled. The Mist in the Mirror is one of those books you just can't put down and you become totally absorbed in the story from the very first page. The characters and the scenes just come alive. Each chapter is more un-nerving than the last - it's one of the most chilling books you'll ever read.

I agree with some of the other reviewers about the ending - you do feel a little cheated, but the book is so enthralling, it more than makes up for it.
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