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A Mist of Prophecies (Gordianus the Finder Book 9) by [Saylor, Steven]
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A Mist of Prophecies (Gordianus the Finder Book 9) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Length: 385 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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"As usual, Saylor's research is impeccable, but the history never distracts from the very human drama.... With this intelligent and compelling story, Saylor shows once again why fans of ancient historicals regard him as the leader of the field."--"Publishers Weekly" (Starred Review) "The problem with a writer with the brilliance of Steven Saylor is that he leaves almost impossible standards for other writers to measure up to. With A Mist of Prophecies, Saylor exceeds even his usual standards of excellence."--"El Paso Times""" "Vivid and robust...exquisite detail and powerful drama."--"Philadelphia Inquirer""" "If you want to visit Rome--ancient Rome--this is the way to go!" --"Oklahoman""" "It would be impossible to imagine a more stellar lineup of suspects in all imperial Rome." --"Kirkus Reviews" "A fascinating work!" --"Midwest Book Review""" "One of the best mystery series being published today...A pitch-perfect work...gripping prose." --"Austin Chronicle" "Saylor writes with such easy grace that the politics of these vicious times become as captivating to the reader as the mystery of Cassandra's life and violent death." --"Tampa Tribune & Times""" "A gritty depiction of the underbelly of the great city in its heyday...The secret history of Rome has never been so fascinating." --Maxim Jakubowski, "The Guardian"

Waterstone's Quarterly, June, 2002

'It is a class above the most historical crime fiction.'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 831 KB
  • Print Length: 385 pages
  • Publisher: C & R Crime; Re-issue edition (19 Jan. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005RZB6RE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #155,671 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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By A Customer on 24 July 2002
Format: Hardcover
The Mists of Prophecy
The Mists of Prophecy is the latest in Steven Saylor's Rome Sub Rosa series and marks the return of Gordianus the Finder. While Rome anxiously waits to hear the outcome of the war between Pompey and Caesar a beautiful young seeress, the aptly named Cassandra, is poisoned. As Gordianus investigates her death he comes into contact with the wives of many of the men that have been at the centre of Saylor's earlier mysteries and reminisces about his own intense relationship with the murdered woman.
As with his previous books Saylor manages to weave historical fact and fiction so tightly that readers may be tempted to consult the history books to establish which events are documented fact and which only occurred in the imagination of the author. The supporting cast of recurring characters continues to increase which each novel but now at the expense of some stalwarts (eg. Gordianus and his older son are suddenly distant for not apparent reason) although any appearance by Clodia is worth sacrificing a considerably less interesting character for.
After a disappointing entry with Last Seen in Massallia Saylor has had a return to form with this book and although it does not reach the heights of Murder on the Appian Way fans will find much to enjoy. As with the most recent novels in the series a more sombre atmosphere pervades this book than in his earlier works. The disintegration of his relationship with his son Meto, a devoted follower of Caesar, weighs heavily on Gordianus's mind as does the mysterious illness of his wife and crushing debt. This Gordianus is not the sardonic observer of earlier novels but a tired and aging man on whom political upheaval and his own personal problems are taking their toll.
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Format: Paperback
This was the second Steven Saylor book I have read and have since ordered all of the 'Roma Sub Rosa' Series.
In this book Saylor creates a first class mystery which seems to have a life of its own. Caesar is away from Rome engaging Pompey, his rival, in battle, leaving lesser mortals to care for the city and the citizens' problems - not altogether satisfactorily. Times are hard and there is widespread unrest against which Saylor weaves a tale of intrigue and deceit wherein from beginning to almost the end it is never clear what roles Cassandra, the young seeress, and the most important females of Rome play. Saylor's tapestry contains threads of the culture and society of the time integral to the mystery adding shadow and light to the tale. All in all this is a thoroughly interesting and enjoyable read.
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Format: Hardcover
A disappointing entry in the Roma Sub Rosa series after the brilliant "Rubicon" & "Last Seen in Massilia". With those books Saylor took us into the heart of the civil war tearing Rome apart, but here he takes a step back. Unfortunately the case Gordianus is pursuing is a minor one and worse still the Finder seems engulfed in a perilous depression. His mood permeates the book in a negative way, weighing down the narrative and hobbling an already pedestrian plot. The book finally catches fire at the end and hopefully bodes well for the next instalment (Gordianus in Egypt with Caesar, Pompey and Cleopatra?)
An enjoyable read, but below Saylor's usually flawless standards.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is another great read from Steven Saylor. Slightly different from many of the other books in the series, in that it's main plot is fairly simple, and very close to Gordianus, it is nevertheless a compelling read. The usual great events are happening around him, as Gordianus attempts to find out who murdered a young and beautiful woman who was - or may have been - able to prophesy the future. He has other reasons for wanting to solve the crime, but that would spoil the story for you!
Suffice to say, this is as good as the rest of the series.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This has a slightly different narrative style to the other books in the series with movement back and forth in the timeline of events. This works very well for this story and shows Saylors writing ability. Overall the story is a little bit more slowly paced that previous ones but reward the reader who has kept abreast of the large number of characters who now occupy the environment.
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I think that this is the best of the series, so far - previously I've found the author's tendency to make apparent his knowledge of Rome rather tedious, but there is none of that in this book and it benefits as a result. highly recommended.
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I brought the books in paperback version initially, now I've got them on my kindle. Great story lines and a rip roaring read, you feel you're part of Roman history. Love the diverse family and the plots woven around historical events.
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By Rotgut VINE VOICE on 18 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback
Classical Rome is the setting for this historical murder-mystery. Part of the "Roma sub Rosa" series featuring Gordianus the Finder.

I haven't read any of the previous books of this series, or, in fact, any of Saylor's work. Not a bad introduction; This is a solid enough read, it is more or less self contained though, inevitably, past volumes are referenced and the ending leaves plenty of loose ends for the next episode.

Told in a dual narrative structure, in the first person, the two strands are the events leading up to and following on from the death of Cassandra, a mysterious prophetess. This structure is maintained almost to the end of the book and is well done.

The set up, a collection of Rome's most powerful women present themselves as suspects at the girl's funeral, feels very forced but apart from this one scene, which is needed for plot purposes of course, the historical detail and background is convincing.
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