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The Miracle at St. Bruno's (The Daughters of England Book 1) by [Carr, Philippa]
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The Miracle at St. Bruno's (The Daughters of England Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
Book 1 of 20 in The Daughters of England (20 Book Series)
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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1969 KB
  • Print Length: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Open Road Media Romance (19 Feb. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00B7UNXUG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #278,158 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback
The first in Philippa Carr's "Daughters of England" series, this is the story of Damask Farland, who grew up in London during the reign of King Henry VIII. She witnesses some terrible events, including her own father being executed for treason, (and in those days treason could be as simple as discussing the King in private). This is an unusual story, as Damask marries Bruno, a man who is convinced he is some sort of Messiah, because he was found in the crib at St Bruno's Abbey on Christmas morning. At times the gossipy references to the King's court feel too lightweight, but this is still an absorbing look at what it must have felt like to be a relatively ordinary person living during some traumatic times. The only downside is that Damask gets more drippy as she gets older, but this is still a good tale.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I first read this book shortly after its first publication in 1974, I was then in my mid teens and devouring romantic historical fiction almost as fast as the books were published. Philippa Carr, Victoria Holt, aka as Jean Plaidy were amongst my favourite historical authors, so it was with this in mind, I picked up a copy of this reissued first book in the Daughter of England series, in the hope that their appeal would be everlasting.

Maybe my perception of historical romance has altered with the passage of time, as sadly for me the appeal seems to have been lost. Overall, I found the story rather laboured, with little really happening for the first third of the story. However, there is no denying that the book has been well researched, and to some extent manages to capture the heady and challenging days of Tudor England, with some unexpected twists and turns in the story, which add interest.

A nice story if you haven't read the series before.
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Format: Hardcover
I started reading Victoria Holt novels some 30+ years ago and instantly liked her style.
"Lord of the Far Island", "Mistress of Mellyn", "Bride of Pendorric" and "Devil on Horseback" were similarly satisfying reads, but for me the "Daughters of England" series of books (ca. 20 volumes) is unsurpassed.
Victoria Holt wrote "Daughters of England" under her Philippa Carr pseudonym. Volume one (Miracle at St. Bruno's) starts in the 1500's (the closing of the monasteries) and follows the same family through many generations into the 20th century. The first 5 or 6 sequels are especially good and unpredictable!
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Format: Paperback
A young woman has to contend with a very religious but obviously lusty stepfather and with her burgeoning attraction to a young man who was discovered as a baby left in the local monastery and is considered to be a miracle.

Having read some Victoria Holt novels, over the years, I picked up another one of her pseudonyms. The big difference in this from the Holt titles is the lack of romance and the definite emphasis on sex. That's not to say this is packed with descriptions of explicit sex, it isn't. The heroine's virtue is challenged all the time especially by her stepfather, which lends the book a slightly more adult emphasis. The main story of her relationship with the human miracle of St Bruno provides the book with a fairly creepy climax, as she uncovers the truth about him.

So, an enjoyable fast paced read to pass the time. Off-beat enough to be more diverting than a bog-standard historical romance.
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