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Ministry of Bombs by [Lowhim, Nelson]
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Ministry of Bombs Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 310 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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About the Author

Lowhim served in the US Army as a Green Beret Engineer and graduated from Columbia University. He's been published in LA review of LA, Nine Line Anthology, and Afterwords. Born in the bubbling cauldron of Tanzania, where he picked up his first pen at the age of two and chewed. He's progressed much since then. He wrote his first story at 5, a knockoff of all the prince-saves-princess stories he'd read at the time. Life did not rest. It took him to India, then frigid Michigan. The shock, according to parent-sources, was a character building exercise. Lowhim, however, only remembered clenched fingers trying to write. Shorts about teen angst kept him going. Soon he was hitchhiking the mountainous American West where the outlaw locals kept his journal full of color. It wasn't long before he joined the US Army where the detritus of Babylon only furthered his literary ambitions. Iraq wasn't done with him. He would return, an engineer in 5th SFG. When he returned from this trip, he finished his first novel. Released upon the world, he attended Columbia University. He spent his free time writing and working with other authors. He graduated and has since been penning some of the most ambitious novels this side of that Pluto rock. Lowhim currently lives with his girlfriend in the Bronx. You can visit his blog at: http://nelsonlowhim.blogspot.com/ And you can sign up for book deals here: http://eepurl.com/DX2In His novels are: When Gods Fail (the series), The Struggle Trilogy, Tree of Freedom, and CityMuse

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1966 KB
  • Print Length: 310 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Eiso Publishing; 1 edition (21 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HHFXL9I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,816,830 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
A "terrorist thriller"? Admittedly not my normal "cup of tea." In fact, the whole "action" genre, the cowboys with the white hats and black hats, well, I gave up on that a number of decades ago. However, I had been quite impressed with Nelson Lowhim's The Struggle Trilogy: 1. Lowhim was an American soldier in the Iraq War (well, one of them), and what impressed me was his thinking and depiction of those who opposed American efforts. Instead of the all-too-often abstract distillation of pure evil, the author presented many "gray hats," on both sides - just like in real life. And thus when this work came to my attention, I decided to step outside my usual "genre box," and see what he had to say.

And in many ways I was not disappointed. Lowhim stays true to his "gray hat" world-view, even in a genre not known for it. There was also the additional pull that much of the action takes place in a country I once visited as a tourist, and know I never will be able to again: the Yemen, or what the Romans once called "Arabia Felix," the happy part of Arabia because it was so green and fertile. One of the three principle characters, Ali, is a Yemeni. Lowhim depicts him as so very many of them are: fierce and proud, even though poor, and willing to die to defend his honor. Ali represents a people who were never (really) colonized, despite a few in-roads at Aden. The second principle character is the ironically named Justice, a CIA operative on the way up, he hopes, if his own reservations about what his Agency does - does not get in the way. And the third principle character is Dr. Noklar, not just any Pakistani, but the "father" of their atomic bomb.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I received a free copy of this book for an honest review.

A slightly different take on the "terrorist" thriller but a good one. Justice was a character you could really get behind he felt human and vulnerable in a way that most action characters just don't. Goes to places you would not see coming and felt like the author really knew these people and their stories.
Highly recommended.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reading outside my normal genres... 19 Jun. 2015
By John P. Jones III - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A "terrorist thriller"? Admittedly not my normal "cup of tea." In fact, the whole "action" genre, the cowboys with the white hats and black hats, well, I gave up on that a number of decades ago. However, I had been quite impressed with Nelson Lowhim's The Struggle Trilogy. Lowhim was an American soldier in the Iraq War (well, one of them), and what impressed me was his thinking and depiction of those who opposed American efforts. Instead of the all-too-often abstract distillation of pure evil, the author presented many "gray hats," on both sides - just like in real life. And thus when this work came to my attention, I decided to step outside my usual "genre box," and see what he had to say.

And in many ways I was not disappointed. Lowhim stays true to his "gray hat" world-view, even in a genre not known for it. There was also the additional pull that much of the action takes place in a country I once visited as a tourist, and know I never will be able to again: the Yemen, or what the Romans once called "Arabia Felix," the happy part of Arabia because it was so green and fertile. One of the three principle characters, Ali, is a Yemeni. Lowhim depicts him as so very many of them are: fierce and proud, even though poor, and willing to die to defend his honor. Ali represents a people who were never (really) colonized, despite a few in-roads at Aden. The second principle character is the ironically named Justice, a CIA operative on the way up, he hopes, if his own reservations about what his Agency does - does not get in the way. And the third principle character is Dr. Noklar, not just any Pakistani, but the "father" of their atomic bomb.

Lowhim puts the three principles, and a reasonable supporting cast of characters of a collision course. The central issue is a hauntingly real one, certainly one that I am concerned about. With the "war on terror" seemingly endless, and with all too many American actions designed to create two new terrorists for every one America kills, sooner or later, some terrorist will have the motivation and wherewithal to set off an atomic bomb in an American city.

The author does nuance, and divided loyalties. Ali is concerned that all too many "on his team" are not trying to build something, anything, but only destroy. Justice is justly, as it were, motivated that there should never be another 9-11, yet has qualms that his Agency's actions are bound to ensure another one does. Haunting is Lowhim's portrayal of the Yemen today, where death can so arbitrarily fall from the sky, via drones, and there are no consequences or accountability. And the author depicts the American Ambassador to the Yemen as another "Ugly American," brash, bold, and on the make, just using the "war on terror" to promote his own personal agenda.

Still, I had some problems with the plausibility of the plot, at several junctures. Even in "action thrillers," do people really perform in that manner? A few too many implausible jumps in the action, and twists in motivation, coupled with an improbable geography. It was one of the most unlikely journeys to Nice, where an equally unlikely denouement occurs. Overall, 4-stars.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Secret Agent Terrorist Thriller 9 April 2014
By Reviews Make for Wiser Purchases - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
In his book, Ministry of Bombs, Nelson Lowhim gives us three distinct characters and life situations and then intertwines them in such a way not only to bring them into each other's lives but to captivate his audience. Each character represents a different aspect of the world we live in where hate and bias often create a stifling culture. We meet Ali, an Al Qaeda leader seasoned in planning and carrying all types of terrorism, Dr. Naydar famous for his brilliant mind and design abilities with nuclear bombs and Justice, determined not to let 9/11 happen again, a Secret Agent on his first solo mission.

Lowhim’s development of Dr Naydar and Ali is remarkable. In particular his portrayal of their inner struggles. Each is in a world where there seems to be no room for a change The lines are black and white. Yet they each began to listen to their hearts and to open their eyes. Perhaps all is not as it seems and change is needed. Nelson gives us such a look into Ali’s heart, such a raw pain, such an awareness of a future denied and such transparency. However, I found Justice’s story to be weak and unrealistic. Who could get even be an agent with that agency as ignorant, ill at ease and without initiative as he was? Did we have to repeat his phone calls to his boss with background laughter repeatedly as if the agency itself was a joke? And the whole thing with the paintings? Not to be a spoiler but there was so much to Justice that could have been handled better.

Often with political, war type reading it is easy to get lost. At least for me. Not so here. We were going from one country to the other at the turn of the page, but did so fluidly. The plot flowed very well. Background information was developed in such a way it was difficult not to cheer for each character (okay, so I did.).

I had some apprehension over the political leaning and persuasive element this type book might present and frankly a few spots early on that I felt affirmed those. The only thing he seemed to be adamant about was American forces enjoying and laughing about killing innocents (children). If I saw that tone in future books by him I would see it as a problem. Other than that it was well rounded. Lowhim is dealing with a sensitive topic and he did well in showing strengths, weaknesses and struggles of each.

Lowhim impressed me with his writing skills, his ability to captivate the reader, the multi-faceted storyline, the main characters and his supporting characters. He also did something that is rare in a young writer. He caused me to think, to question, to wonder and to do a self-check. For that I am glad. May I never be too stuck in my on way of thinking, but to be willing to stand back, examine a situation and make a decision based on what is before me at that time. We have areas that are unchangeable; my faith is one of those. On those we stand firm. But so many areas are not and this is a good reminder to look beyond stereotypical attitudes and philosophy.

Great book! I am heading to the next one!! Join me?

NOTE: I was given an E-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good thriller 17 Aug. 2014
By Cate's Book Nut Hut - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is the second review on work by this Author that I have done and, after reading The Struggle Trilogy I was ready to settle in and enjoy the ride. Unfortunately this was not the case, although I enjoyed this book immensely it just didn’t have the same punch that the trilogy had, and left me wanting something more by the time I turned the last page.

It wasn’t the characters that left this book wanting in my opinion as, with his usual style and skill the Author was able to take three totally distinct and separate protagonists and weave their varying belief systems and convictions into one very compelling story that pulls the reader in. A was a little disappointed with the characters though; in the story the reader encounters two very strong characters who have no grey areas in their lives, everything is either black or white there is no in-between ground. However, with these characters, as the story progresses the Author begins to place chinks in their armour and slow change can be seen. With the remaining character, this is not the case. He is awkward, unrealistic and does not have any endearing qualities whatsoever. I was hoping that, as with the other two, he would develop and grown as the plot progressed, but this was not to be the case which was a shame as I felt there could have been so much more to him.

As with any novel concerning war, there will be a political leaning in the text, and this was the case here. Whether or not you agree with the arguments and discussions presented in this novel, one thing it will do is make the reader think. As in all walks of life there are those that delight in the suffering and death of innocents, and for the most part society hides it away at the back of the proverbial closet. Not here and, as uncomfortable as it may make some readers feel he addresses this aspect in connection with the military and, as a former member of the US Forces I felt that he was injecting some of his own personal experiences from association with others that fell into this unsavoury category.

Although not as good, in my opinion, as his first trilogy, this book is still well worth the read and I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys a political thriller or spy novel.

Originally posted on: http://catesbooknuthut.com/2014/08/15/review-ministry-of-bombs-nelson-lowhim/
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Justice Will Prevail? 7 April 2014
By J Phillips - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I received this book from the author thru LibraryThing in exchange for an honest review. The story was very well developed and the multiple characters were easy to follow. Justice, Ali, and Nasar were great characters and easy to support in their adventures. The ending of the book was great, but was not expected. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good action adventure. I will be looking for other books by this author and hopefully Justice will return for anothr adventure.
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