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Mighty Like A Rose (Expanded Edition) Extra tracks, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered

4.6 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

Price: £34.00
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Product details

  • Audio CD (19 Nov. 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Extra tracks, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Warner Strategic Marketing
  • ASIN: B00006LJ6Y
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 240,410 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. The Other Side Of Summer
  2. Hurry Down Doomsday
  3. How To Be Dumb
  4. All Grown Up
  5. Invasion Hit Parade
  6. harpies Bizarre
  7. After The Fall
  8. Georgia And Her Rival
  9. So Like Candy
  10. Interlude: Couldn’t Call it Unexpected No 2
  11. Playboy To A Man
  12. Sweet Pear
  13. Broken
  14. Couldn’t Call It Unexpected No 4

Disc: 2

  1. Just Another Mystery Train
  2. Sweet Pear
  3. Couldn’t Call It Unexpected No 4 Mischievous Ghost
  4. St Stephen’s day Murders
  5. The Other Side Of Summer
  6. Deep Dark Truthful Mirror
  7. Hurry Down Doomsday
  8. All Grown Up
  9. Georgia And Her Riva
  10. Forgive Her Anything
  11. It Started To Come To Me
  12. I Still Miss Someone/The Last Town I Painted
  13. Put Your Big Toe In The Milk Of Human Kindness
  14. Invasion Hit Parade
  15. Just Another Mystery Train
  16. Broken

Product Description

Our product to treat is a regular product. There is not the imitation. From Japan by the surface mail because is sent out, take it until arrival as 7-14 day. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Reading the chapter on Costello in Nick Kent's The Dark Stuff, he certainly comes across as a bitter old man towards the end- griping against Happy Mondays & espousing classical music. Mighty Like a Rose was the album that best summed up this period categorised as "The Beard Years"- which saw Costello become an imposing Rasputin lookalike, scaring my mother when he appeared on Alan Bleasdale's This is Your Life (he scored GBH around this period). Mighty Like a Rose was largely written off, along with THe Juliet Letters & Kojak Variety it left people cold- Costello fans would generally not be appeased till 1994's Attractions-comeback Brutal Youth.
This I think is a shame, as Mighty Like a Rose extends on territory mapped out on previous albums Imperial Bedroom (1982) & Spike (1989). The first disc here collects the 14 songs that made up Mighty Like a Rose- & I don't think there's a dud in there. All Grown Up sounds like Richard Thompson singing a lost Lennon/McCartney song, while McCartney- who co-wrote Veronica & My Brave Face with Costello- is McCartney to Costello's Lennon on So Like Candy.
Costello is not a happy bunny here- Hurry Down Doomsday (The Bugs Are Taking Over) sounds like a fusion of Plastic Ono-Lennon, Franz Kafka & the kind of industrial noises co-producer Mitchell Froom would produce on Suzanne Vega's 99 F. The Other Side of Summer sounds like a hit single that never was- easily up there with anything from Armed Forces (and showcasing Brian Wilson-style aspirations). Invasion Hit Parade sounds like a bleak relative of Beyond Belief, prior to harsh guitar inflected sounds & a killer chorus- the riffs are definitely related to the desperate pulse of 86's Uncomplicated.
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Format: Audio CD
Mighty Like A Rose is a much better album than many reviewers would have you believe. For me this is a continuation on some of themes he started on Spike, although it's a very different to that album. Essentially Costello is starting to become more experimental with this album and is starting to draw on some of his classical interests, which he explores further on GBH and Jakes Progress soundtracks. It remains very much a pop album despite this just with differeent textures.

It includes some great songs, namely Couldn't Call It unexpected, After The Fall and How to be dumb, which I believe hold up against other classic Costello tracks. You also get the wonderful Other Side of Summer and a couple of collaborations with McCartney.

Essentially a good addition to his catalogue
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Format: Audio CD
Dating from the time that Costello was being influenced by many different musical styles, this album contains a real mix of references from the Beach Boys ('The Other Side of Summer') through Paul McCartney ('So Like Candy') to the Celtic-sounding strains of 'Broken'. Whether such diversity on one album is easily digestible is debatable, and it could be argued that, in Mighty Like A Rose,Costello had lost his focus. However, the album is well worth a listen. There are some worthy individual tracks, in fact this album contains something for everyone. For the true Costello fan, the musical breadth offered will mark an important point in the artist's career. Maybe not Costello at his best, but certainly an interesting collaction.
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Format: Audio CD
I felt compelled to write a review for this album for one reason - Elvis's output has been hit-and-miss over the years, with some exceptional highs set against the inevitable indigestible hiccough (if you pardon the mixed metaphor). Released close to each other, he brought us two comparable yet quite different albums - Spike, and Mighty Like A Rose. I'd like to be perhaps a lone voice saying that MLAR was far superior.

From the aggressive and energetic - and hugely enjoyable - pop-rock of The Other Side of Summer and How To Be Dumb (a public attack on his former Attractions bass player Bruce Thomas) to the delicate, dark beauty of Broken, this is certainly an album of varying styles, but they hold together well, and the tunes generally play out far better than on the earlier album Spike. Costello's infamous occasional habit of producing unlistenable melodies to accompany convoluted lyrics is nowhere to be heard here, and where he does venture into less mainstream sounds (for instance, in Couldn't Call It Unexpected Nr 2), the near-seamless production allows him to blend this with the rest of the songs without any jarring at all.

Georgie And Her Rival sounds as though it actually belongs on the album Spike, telling us two things - first, that the production here is so coherent that such judgements can be made; and second, that the two albums are indeed to be judged next to each other.

In all, this is excellent stuff: pointed, angry enough yet poignant enough to please any die-hard fan, and brilliantly tuneful.

Mighty Like A Rose works on many levels, and is worth many hearings.
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Format: Audio CD
EC has made some truly fantastic albums over the years, but 1982's "Imperial Bedroom" (commonly called his masterpiece) is not one of them. Overproduced, overwrought, glutinous and not even that catchy, melodically. This 1991 album is the same 'quasi-classical' pop-rock territory revisited and done ten times better. I understand it's supposed to be one of his worst albums - as is typical in these instances, it may well be his best.
Toxic Beach Boys ("The Other Side Of Summer"), drum-loop clatter and Mark E Smith rant ("Hurry Down Doomsday") and the nastiest song he's ever written ("How To Be Dumb") make for a seriously impressive opening salvo. Then there's the swoony orchestral "All Grown Up", the upbeat but oddly haunting "Georgie And Her Rival", the raucous "Payboy To A Man" (which sounds like The Fall meets Little Richard meets The Wildhearts!), the heartbreaking "So Like Candy" (although the verses on this one kind of plod), the even more heartbreaking "Broken" (an exquisite lyric), and the closing "Couldn't Call It Unexpected"...well, there's a good reason everyone gushes over this song. Haunting, beautiful, highly scary (it's basically about death)...it's got it all.
Of the rest, "Harpies Bizarre" is self-conscious but interesting, "Invasion Hit Parade" is overlong but has a great, unique chorus, and "After The Fall" "Sweet Pear" and the instrumental are perhaps superfluous.
His next full-on 'rock' album, 1994's "Brutal Youth" is even better! Elvis Costello - Paul Weller with talent, charm, and brains! What else do you need, people?!
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