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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 3 March 2012
One of my guilty pleasures is fine dining, so almost by default I tend to buy the Michelin Guide every year. This will be the last one of these books I buy in the current format. The book is just far, far too cluttered and lacking in detail about specific establishments and in my opinion is trying to be too many things to too many people. It is admirable to try to review so many hotels and restaurants throughout Great Britain and Ireland, but it is time to either split the guide into two separate guides for restaurants and hotels, or perhaps split the guide into smaller geographical regions (for example a guide each for London, England (excluding London) and Scotland, Wales and Ireland). The other alternative would be to greatly increase the size of the guide itself, which wouldn't be good as it would become too unwieldy.

If I randomly open the guide and read about a Chinese restaurant, I am told of a "Popular Chinese restaurant in former pub on village green. Comfortable homely inner. Polite, smartly attired staff. Vast menu with plenty of Peking and Sichuan favourites." And that's it. The guide tells me the address and phone number, the average price of the set and à la carte menus, but not a single word about the quality of the food. This restaurant gets two forks and spoons, which equates to being rated "comfortable" but this is basically telling me nothing. Too many entries in the guide reveal very little about the establishments that they are reviewing. If I want to find out information about hotels, the Trip Advisor website is infinitely more useful in almost all cases. The Good Food Guide 2011 has a much better layout when it comes to a restaurant guide, with a bigger font that is much easier to digest and in most cases has far more detailed, specific information about what you might expect to find.

The only selling point for the Michelin Guide seems to be to see who has been awarded Michelin stars. However even starred restaurants often have short descriptions in the guide. I can very easily find out online who holds Michelins stars (and how many of them) without needing to buy this guide, which sadly for me no longer serves any purpose.
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on 3 March 2011
I have been getting the wee red book for a few years now.
I know all the info is available online but the book is really easy to use and it's nice to sit and plan my next culinary trip away from the computer screen.
The special edition this year was even nicer than normal (hardback) and the free history of Michelin book was an unexpected treat.
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on 16 March 2011
I always find Michelin Guide helpful for my travel in UK. However, there are too few restaurants recommended in the guide book. And only little change in the part of Wales.
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on 3 July 2011
This year, when I got my copy of this I did what I usually do: look to see what restaurants near me have kept their place, which have been added, and which have got the boot. This year there were some real surprises, with restaurants I would have reckoned were "sure things" losing any mention at all. (One favourite has gone from 3 red forks to no entry at all). It's just an impression, but I have the feeling that this guide has been slimmed back and quite a few restaurants have been dropped (at least in the South West). It is certainly a slightly smaller guide than it has been.
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I have always liked the Michelin Guide. If you like fine restaurants, it's about the most authoritative. It can be a bit difficult to navigate around the pages and it takes a while to get used to their system. There's a separate section for London. Its list of restaurants is select - but that's the point and descriptions quite short but it gives you all you need to know. I prefer it to the Hardens and Zagat guides (though those have more comprehensive lisitngs). It's genuinely pocket sized and is great value for money.
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on 11 May 2013
This is the centenary edition and comes with an additional book commemorating the occasion. A great reference book, with lots of little bits for those interested in fine dining. People will always argue as to whether a restaurant deserves a Michelin star, but at least with this book, you are rarely going to eat badly.
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on 20 February 2011
The Michelin guide britain has gone through a lot of criticsm this year. While criticism is not new to the Michelin, this year was especially harsh since almost every major critic slashed the guide. There may be no exciting additions to the starred estamblishments but that is not exactly Michelin' fault is it?! Michelin continues to be the most professional and venerable guide for restaursants and cuisine and as far as I'm concerned we should all be grateful that such a guide exists.

Dan
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on 20 February 2011
Michelin is always useful, but the Guide's obsession with only VERY expensive hotels and restaurants and its poor and inadequate coverage of ethnic restaurants (Chinese, Thai, Indian etc) makes it of limited use. However, if it helps to avoid just ONE lousy restaurant or if it guides you to just ONE good meal you would otherwise have missed it has earned its keep.
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