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Of Mice and Men (Penguin Modern Classics) by [Steinbeck, John]
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Of Mice and Men (Penguin Modern Classics) New Ed , Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 1,648 customer reviews

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Review

"Of Mice and Men is a thriller, a gripping tale running to novelette length that you will not set down until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story."--The New York Times

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom."--Chicago Tribune

"A short tale of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece to the modern tough-tender school of American fiction."--Times Literary Supplement [London]

Of Mice and Men is a thriller, a gripping tale running to novelette length that you will not set down until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story. The New York Times

Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom. Chicago Tribune

A short tale of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece to the modern tough-tender school of American fiction. Times Literary Supplement [London]"

Of Mice and Men is a thriller, a gripping tale running to novelette length that you will not set down until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story. The New York Times

Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom. Chicago Tribune

A short tale of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece to the modern tough-tender school of American fiction. Times Literary Supplement [London]

"

"Of Mice and Men is a thriller, a gripping tale running to novelette length that you will not set down until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story."--The New York Times

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom."--Chicago Tribune

"A short tale of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece to the modern tough-tender school of American fiction."--Times Literary Supplement [London]

Book Description

George Milton and Lennie Small are two workers in pursuit of the American dream in this classic work of literature

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 634 KB
  • Print Length: 116 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New Ed edition (7 Sept. 2000)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI9VVM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 1,648 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,722 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer reviews

Top customer reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The film, `Of Mice and Men,' - 1992 version, will always be one of my favourites. It encouraged me read this book. Firstly, I was amazed at just how short the book is at 150 pages! It's a book you can read in day with time to spare! The story though, still comes across as just fine and is never less than interesting and engaging with many topical points to dwell on.
This particular book is also written for GCSE study, which I don't intend to comment on, as many have already done so.
For me the main player here, and centre of attention, is Lennie. He is intellectually disabled, with a childlike imagination. A comparison to some degree would be Forest Gump or `Karl' from `Sling Blade.'
He drifts during the Great Depression, and looks for work under Roosevelt's 'New Deal' , with his best and only friend George, who continually mothers him and keeps him out of mischief. They are like chalk and cheese but need each other? They follow the American dream of one day owning their own bit of land - it eventually transpires that they are not the only ones?
Eventually they end up on a farm in California and this is where we meet several different characters and the story unfolds. Steinbeck's writing style describes them all perfectly well and this is a feature of his writing. It is also quite clear that he is very knowledgeable about farm life and also the countryside that surrounds it.
Whilst I'd seen the film first, I still found the book totally engaging, even though it was very similar to the film. The characters (including the leads) do leave a lasting impression and stir the old grey matter! They are all so different - even though the tale is so brief. They raise questions of: loyalty, pity, vulnerability, sadness, anger & inferiority, loneliness / isolation and of course, from that period - racism.
Finally, what helps to make this book such an interesting read is the dialogue and slang used - the book's glossary is very helpful.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My daughter had to buy this book for her English Literature GCSE Exam and she told me it was very convenient. The pages that summarise the chapter helped her find the main points she needed to revise for her exams. They were also a useful way to go back and remember what happened without having to re-read the entire chapter.

There were questions at the end of the book that you could answer that helped her to understand the context, content, author and characters better.

My daughter tells me Of Mice and Men is a detailed and intricate story written in the 1930s by John Steinbeck. It tells the story of George and Lennie, two migrant ranch workers, sharing a dream of one day owning their own ranch and also their struggle of trying to survive due to lack of money. The book also includes the most important issues regarding society in America during the great depression which were my daughters GCSE topics for this novel such as racism, sexism, prejudice and the American Dream. It is a highly thought provoking story wherein the simplest of sentences has a profound deeper meaning.

Overall it’s a very good book with useful summarised pages and questions that make it easy to understand and use as a revision tool for GCSE English Literature. I would definitely recommend it for anyone who either is doing this for their GCSEs or has a teenager that is.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Of Mice and Men is a well-known classic, and with valid reason. The book may seem rather boring (as many books about the Great Depression may seem) but it is actually a great tribute to literature.

Steinbeck is a great writer who makes brilliant use of description for his characters and in his reflective prose shows how children are, in some cases, better people than adults in the way that they do not judge or do not see people or things from that point of view.

The book shows some of the other characters' feelings about the situations they are being put in and shows how Steinbeck feels about racism and sexism. The book covers a variety of topics including racism, sexism, the Depression, in very little time. A well written though-provoking book that is a must read for anyone.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The story is very intriguing. Includes a summary of each section and this helps in the revision for an exam if you need to find a certain part of the book quickly. At the back of the book and in each section, it also contains questions that you can answer.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a short story really - I was surprised by its brevity considering its vaunted literary status.

Nothing wrong with it exactly. An economical, tightly composed, tragic tale of a man, Lennie Small, not quite meant for this world. His clumsy, brute physicality, combined with his mental simplicity, an accident waiting to happen. And about his tender friendship, of course, with the patient and stalwart, George Milton.

Perhaps the outcome is too heavily telegraphed, and the men's Californian dream of land and plenty overplayed to mawkish excess? Still, there's no doubt it packs a punch in a cool, understated, no nonsense way. But, ah, those goddam rabbits!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great book can inspire generations by perceptive characterisation and a meaningful take on the human condition. The farm that large, lugubrious and slightly backward Lennie and his companion George work on has a feel of anyplace, anytime near anytown. It's not a cheerful place, but has its' routines, had Steinbeck wanted, he could have asked Judy Garland to stop off there on the way to Oz. It might have cheered us all up, had she done so.

But there's something about misery, especially fatalistic misery, that is significant and may even help us consider our own direction of travel. Dickens was begged by readers of his penny magazines to end some of his books happily - but rightly refused.

Travelling to different places, hewing a rough living, dreaming of their own land, with rabbits for Lennie to pet, presumably a cathouse nearby for George to socialise in, without the insecurity, drudgery and hopelessness, makes this an aspirational novel. For a while. Until Lennie veers closer and closer to doing 'bad things', albeit, innocuously.

John Steinbeck didn't need to write a 964 page novel like War and Peace to capture emotion, loyalty, buddy-mentality and destiny. Curley's wife - never named, just an appendage of Curley - is as much a victim of fate as of circumstances. The mannerisms, boredom, dislike of her jealous husband and belief she could have become someone in Hollywood is the same now for wannabes on tv talent contests and reality shows. All that's missing is talent; this great book's got plenty of reality.

The climax is bitter, sad, but inevitable. Those horses in the barn are still clanging and rattling their halter chains, flies are still buzzing, Curley probably has a new wife - called Curley's wife - Candy, Crookes, Slim and the others are still breaking their backs, hoping for the American Dream to become a reality with their own purty little farm and cottage; but Lennie is petting no more.
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