Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Mezzanine Paperback – 12 Jan 1998

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 12 Jan 1998
£56.74 £9.90
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Granta Books; New edition edition (12 Jan. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1862070989
  • ISBN-13: 978-1862070981
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.5 x 0.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 172,357 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From the Inside Flap

Turns an ordinary ride up an office escalator into a meditation on our relations with familiar objects--shoelaces, straws, and more. Baker's debut novel, and a favorite amongst many of us here.

About the Author

Nicholson Baker is the author of eight novels The Mezzanine, Room Temperature, Vox, The Fermata, The Anthologist, A Box of Matches, Checkpoint, and The Everlasting Story of Nory and four works of nonfiction, including Human Smoke. He lives with his wife and two children in Maine.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Every so often, one comes across a book that is truly unique. As far as I am concerned, this, for me, is it. The life and times of a lunch hour set out in a highly descriptive and annoyingly accurate tale of life. The book is divided into sections outlining the various thoughts of one man going to lunch, who has more in common with us than we may care to realise. We are told of the subject's inner most thoughts, such as office etiquette, the transition from paper to plastic straws, and the 'obvious' trials encountered when your shoelace decides to die. The true genius of this book can be realised when one reads a section on the life expectancy of a shoelace. I admit, one may find it difficult not to skip to the next chapter in the hands of an ordinary author, yet one becomes fascinated with the depth of thought that has gone into this (and every other) section, which has been brought together through an amazing eye for wit and detail.
Not only is this book a pleasant change from the normal "paint-by-numbers" approach to story formulation, one is surprised at the simple humour that can be found in the apparently simple acts that our subject performs during his day.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Ever wondered how things work,the everyday little things we use and do? Do you like footnotes and digressions?Baker is on acid,but superbly controlled -I don't know how he did it. He grabs approaches from early Beckett,Georges Perec,Paul Auster and even self improvement like Pirsig's Zen and Motorcycle Maintenance.It is probably at the end a lament for childhood memories or a rite of passage through minutiae to what?I read it in alcohohol recovery and it showed me the small picture can be the big one.Unfortunately all the shared references are USA it would be good to have a GB cultural edition.At the end a work of possible genius.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
There are a million and one tiny thoughts that flit unbidden through the human mind every day, and most slip through the fingers before they are even acknowledged. Baker has a gift for retaining these wraith-like filaments of imagination and making them concrete. In what is ostensibly a collection of the thoughts of a man on his lunch hour, Baker takes us through a wildly diverting tour of the minutiae of everyday life, from the coincidental but strangely logical patterns of shoelace wear and tear, to the merits and aesthetics of Soviet-esque stapler arms. Brilliant and jaw-droppingly intuitive, Baker serves up a lunchbox treat of hyper-stylish trivia liberally seasoned with backhanded jokes and a supreme understanding of the human mind.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. I am not a book critic by any means, I have only just started reading on a regular basis, but I am enjoying it greatly, good books, bad books, all genres and ideas.

When I read about the author of this book in a newspaper I looked up the first work which was mentioned in the article, "The Mezzanine", I read descriptions and it sounded exactly like what I would enjoy in a book. What I love about media, whether it be photography, film or now books, what I like is to immerse myself in the ordinary, but not my ordinary, someone else's ordinary. I adore films such as Lost in Translation for example, and this book fit the bill to give me pleasure.

I was right in what I suspected, I read the book in only a couple of days, as it is very small, 135 pages in the edition I read. It's structure is unique, at least unlike anything I have read, with long, floating foot notes that wander from the source and become small stories in themselves, whilst the main story itself continues on. I was laughing to the point at tears at some of the chapters, especially his lengthy discussion of men's bathroom etiquette in an office situation... hilarious!

I would recommend this book to anyone that loves to immerse themself in, as I said, someone else's normality, their every day lives, but an every day life that is not your own. This book submerges you in the mind of the main character, and you feel as though you are along for the ride of one of his lunch breaks - it's really great.

Wholeheartedly recommended.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 7 Mar. 2003
Format: Paperback
This is as great a book as 'Catcher in the Rye'. If you like a book where nothing much happens, but everything ( and I mean everything) is noted down, mulled over, and given great significance for its existence in the moment, then you should enjoy this book. If you think about things, or get stuck on the correct spelling of easy words, then you should enjoy it too.
If you want to start thinking about the detail of what you do, and the why of you doing it, then this book will give you the chance to realise your dream.
If you want to read about a lawyer who nearly gets murdered by his client, John Grisham is down the hall.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It seems to be fairly dividing the audience down the middle, this book. A couple of other reviewers have given it just one star, & said the author's trying too hard to be clever. Others have said he's engrossing, fascinating and funny.

I guess one way to approach it is to ask yourself how your own brain works, and realise what it is you spend your day thinking about - the sort of stuff you find interesting. It's a very personal question, and your answer will be particular only to you, because other people's brains don't work the same way. Question: Do you find it fascinating to think about the tiny, fine details of things, such as why one shoelace wears out before the other (why not both at the same time, since you walk on each foot the same amount?); or gents wash-room ettiquette ?

If you're that type of person, then you will find Nicholson Baker an auther who shares your curiosity - and he uses his books to hold forth on the minutiae of life - the sprockets in celluloid film; candlewick bedspreads; the day-dreams we have - and he does it in a highly funny way. Me: I find his books fascinating and he makes me laugh, and if you like this book, try "Vox", "The Fermata" and "A Box of Matches".
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback