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The Messiah Secret Paperback – 8 Jul 2010

3.7 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam (8 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553825046
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553825046
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.8 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 66,068 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Book Description

From the publishers who brought you Dan Brown, a read-in-one-gulp conspiracy thriller that unravels a mystery older than time itself.

From the Publisher

James Becker writes brilliant thrillers that start by going back in time, and have at their heart a secret which is always based on fact. In The Messiah Secret Chris and Angela travel to Egypt and then northern India in search of the final resting place of ... well, if I told you it would spoil the book, so I won't! It's imaculately researched and grippingly told. It's always a treat when a James Becker manuscript lands on my desk - and this is one of his very best.

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Top customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book at a reasonable cost- story was really engrossing- loved it.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very good read
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Format: Paperback
This is one of those books that was written in an attempt to latch onto the coat tails of the Da Vinci Code. We have a British Museum expert on early ceramics, Angela, chasing around the world with her ex-husband following a treasure trail. This amazing trail has been unsolved for hundreds of years but thankfully Angela can interpret all of the clues in double quick time and follow them across the world. She is hotly pursued by a mad priest, Killian, who isn't worried about who gets killed on the way and JJ Donovan a rich American collector.
This is a very poorly written book. The characters are quite shallow and cardboard like whilst at the same time being amazing and almost superhuman! Angela may have been an expert on early ceramics but fortunately this also made her an expert on a vast amount of religious manuscripts, early languages from Asia and solving puzzles. Bronson, her ex but very friendly husband, is a policeman who is an expert driver and treasure hunter. These two set off across the world without more than a nod to their lives or jobs and with a seemingly endless pot of money. The mad priest and the rich American are so cliched it is painful.
The writing is poor. The reader gets numerous pieces of ancient literature quoted at them which provide clues to this treasure. The reader isn't give the information and clues for themselves but just presented with pages of explanation by Angela. It was frankly quite boring. The description is poor with too much attention being paid to mundain trivialities and not enough the the actual credulity of the plot.
There is a supposedly amazing twist at the end of this book. The author has spent the whole book not naming this treasure that was being sought but it was blatantly obvious.
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Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book, I thought from the reviews that it was a mistake to read it but I was pleasantly surprised. It started off very intriguing and then moved to more modern times. I was hooked most the time. I am not a big reader of books but for me this was an easy read- and I wanted to read more and more I did not anticipate or predict the ending I was just happy to have a book that was enjoyable. I liked the references to Egypt and then to India. I feel that the end was a bit strange but I figured it was something along those lines. I would recommend this book if you are open minded religiously and just want an easy going read. I am glad I read it very enjoyable and I good little plot.
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Format: Paperback
I actually enjoyed reading this book despite the many flaws, and found it hard to put down; but there are so many flaws I feel I need to defend my own beliefs. If you are going to bash a religion - the at least get the details right!

Firstly the red herring that is through most of the book is useless as the title makes you guess the secret from near the beginning; so the author lost any suspense through trying to gain readers. This did spoil the book for me as there was no suspense... but I kept reading.

Secondly I agree with other reviewers that the woman knew far more than was reasonable and to keep the plot we had to trawl through so much information. And why would a loyal mercenary suddenly turn on his long-term employer just because he suddenly gets a bit squeamish of violence... not sure.

Thirdly, and most importantly for me was the Christian context. Anyone who has a strong faith can cope with challenges to it so I don't mind reading anti-Christian books as long as they are reasonable. but there are so many flaws that people who don't know much about this will not realise.

The negative portrayal of the passionately religious priest did not tally with his love of violence - to murder people to keep a vital secret is one thing but to use and archaic form of torture for no real reason seems only Catholic-bashing; however - I also found it a bit pointless about the Priest as if this secret was true and he believed it then the foundation of faith crumbles and his faith would shatter rather than him trying to just keep the secret for the sake of the religion. It doesn't make sense.

Furthermore, the notes at the end justifying the author's point of view were crucially selective and inaccurate.
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Format: Paperback
I read a lot, because of that maybe I'm not super picky about what I pick up, although I do know a bad book when I read it. The range of good to great is a lot more flexible. I enjoyed this book. Becker is no Shakespeare, but I wouldn't go so far as to say he's horrible, like a lot of the other reviewers do. It's a nice, fast paced, quick, mildly entertaining weekend read.

As for the "Christian" question, Becker doesn't do anything that Dan Brown and a dozen others haven't already done with his questioning of the facts surrounding the topic of Christ and Biblical accounts of history. And as the others, he doesn't question the validity of the goodness that came from the teachings of Christ, merely the mystery that surrounds his life and death. Get over it folks, religion is faith and guess work, not fact, it's in it's very nature, and kind of the point for a lot of believers.
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