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Men and Brothers: Anglo-American Anti-slavery Cooperation Hardcover – 1 Aug 1973


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Hardcover, 1 Aug 1973
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 478 pages
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press; First Edition edition (Aug. 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0252002253
  • ISBN-13: 978-0252002250
  • Package Dimensions: 22.9 x 16 x 3.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,003,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

The United States and Great Britain share a common past in bringing slaves to America and trading slave-grown products. They also worked together to end slavery, although the historical literature up to now has treated the British and American antislavery movements separately. This book traces for the first time the coordination of activities and strategies of abolitionists in Great Britain and the United States from the colonial period through the Civil War and shows that, by the 1830's, the two movements "were so intertwined they can scarcely be untangled"


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