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How To Learn And Memorize Latin Vocabulary ... Using A Memory Palace Specifically Designed For Classical Latin (Magnetic Memory Series) by [Metivier, Anthony]
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How To Learn And Memorize Latin Vocabulary ... Using A Memory Palace Specifically Designed For Classical Latin (Magnetic Memory Series) Kindle Edition

2.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 138 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1233 KB
  • Print Length: 138 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Advanced Education Methodology (AEM) (25 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00H0JZ2M0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #122,858 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I didn't find this helpful, it just didn't work for me. I was a bit surprised that approx 65 per cent of the book deals with the subject and the rest is advertising and references to other books that may be helpful. I suppose that is helpful in a way. Maybe other people would find this an ingenious system for memorising vocabulary, but I found it unnecessarily complicated and in places utterly bizarre. Some of Mr Metivier's visualisations are violent and unpleasant. Of course, you make your own imaginary pictures, but I found his descriptions offputting and I was asking myself 'do I want to keep on reading this?'. However, I did continue, (it's quite a short book) and at the end I was mildly irritated by being invited by the author to recommend the book to all my friends so they could benefit by improving their memorising skills. I'm not too bothered about having spent a couple of pounds on the Kindle version but I think I would have regretted spending more on a paper copy.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This probably works for some people, but not for me. I found it all a bit silly, trying to think of rooms and places to put my words.
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not at all helpful and quite a waste of time but thats my opinion only
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Brill!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A unique approach 7 Dec. 2013
By Julie Walter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
We're going to be homeschooling our children, and because it's something I always wished I could do, we're going to teach them Latin. I'm excited about the idea of them being about to read Virgil in the original language (and I'll be able to get some skills at the same time as teaching them...)

I read on a blog about how someone is using mnemonics to teach their children Spanish, so then we found this. The techniques are definitely working for my husband and me - surprisingly so - and it's easy to see how children can use them too. I'm excited to get the kids started - but may just do some of the easier techniques at first (oldest is only three and a half - and while I'm so eager for them to learn, I also want to take it slow, so as to avoid the burnout that we're trying to avoid from school!)
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Misleading description. 31 Mar. 2015
By Matthew Nace - Published on Amazon.com
This book was not quite what was advertised. It seems to be a minor adjustment to a book written about another language. The memory techniques are interesting, but the author clearly doesn't know much about Classical Latin. He at one point talks about declining verbs (verbs are not declined, they are conjugated; nouns are declined). He also suggests read "Classical Latin newspapers or magazines" ... 'cause those are a dime a dozen ... . He also mispronounces word, and I mean the author, not the narrator: he uses phonetics to chose his mnemonic imagery, and chooses some of them according to incorrect pronunciation. I suppose this doesn't really affect the validity of the techniques, but this book is certainly not properly tailored to Latin. You will not find suggestions or techniques specifically geared towards Latin (rather than, say, German).

(Also, VERY heavily padded with advertising for his other publications).
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very useful! 31 Jan. 2014
By Reader from Europe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If only I had this great guide when I was learning Latin at the time! The author has created a system which makes memorizing Latin easy. I will show my eldest daughter who is now struggling with pages and pages of Latin words. She will be grateful to the author!!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Memory Place Method Created A Successful Student! 24 July 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My daughter is taking Honors Latin in high school and was struggling until she read and applied Dr. Metivier's methods. Now her grade is an A from a D!
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars You either love this sort of stuff or hate it 14 Jan. 2015
By jimbryan65 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
You create various "buildings" with "rooms" and place the words in the rooms with various memory tricks. You either love this stuff or find it unhelpful. I do better with flash cards, or pictures are even better. I found it overwhelming to find buildings for all 26 letters of the alphabet with their various rooms and furniture!

Wikepedia The Method of loci (loci being Latin for "places"[1]), also called the memory palace or mind palace technique, is a mnemonic device known to the ancient Greeks and. In this technique the subject memorizes the layout of some building, or the arrangement of shops on a street, or any geographical entity which is composed of a number of discrete loci. When desiring to remember a set of items the subject literally 'walks' through these loci and commits an item to each one by forming an image between the item and any distinguishing feature of that locus. Retrieval of items is achieved by 'walking' through the loci, allowing the latter to activate the desired items
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