FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Memoirs Of An Imaginary F... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend Paperback – 1 Mar 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 115 customer reviews

See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99
£1.70 £0.01
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£9.99 FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Memoirs Of An Imaginary Friend
  • +
  • Tell the Wolves I'm Home
Total price: £17.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere (1 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0751547875
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751547870
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.8 x 20.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 16,995 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

From no. 1 bestselling author Jodi Picoult: 'A novel as creative, brave, and pitch-perfect as its narrator, an imaginary friend named Budo, who reminds us that bravery comes in the most unlikely forms. It has been a long time since I read a book that has captured me so completely, and has wowed me with its unique vision. You've never read a book like this before. As Budo himself might say: Believe me' (Jodi Picoult)

Remarkably fun, has adventure and mystery and unlike anything you'll have read before . . . It is undeniably an absorbing story that is more than a little magical (Bookbag blog)

An endearing tale of love, loyalty and the extraordinary power of a child's imagination (Glamour)

This story is simultaneously heartbreaking and uplifting, essentially celebrating the extraordinary power of the mind (Image Magazine)

A captivating novel that you'll want to read in one sitting (Bella)

This debut is a fantastic idea that'll really capture the imagination (Star)

Uplifting..Don't Miss (Woman and Home)

This story is simultaneously heartbreaking and uplifting, essentially celebrating the extraordinary power of the mind (Image magazine)

An absorbing, moving story (Cosmopolitan)

Seriously impressive (Heat)

A perfect read for fans of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Holiday magazine)

Refreshingly different (Woman)

Book Description

For readers who loved Room and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time: a heartwarming, heartbreaking story of love, loyalty and the power of the imagination - a novel perfect for anyone who ever had a friend . . . real or otherwise.

See all Product Description

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really loved this book. The idea to have the story narrated by a child's imaginary friend could so easily have seemed gimmicky in the hands of a lesser writer. Instead, Matthew Green imbues the titular character, Budo, with humour, warmth and pathos to create a friend who is both as loving and as flawed as any real human being. Green also touches on a myriad of big issues here: bullying, death, disability, marital breakdown, friendship, trust and more. But it is all done sensitively and with great warmth. This means a story which could easily be heartbreaking is fast-paced and often funny, and the inherent sadness never overwhelms. This has been compared to "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" which is high praise to live up to, but "Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend" is more than worthy of the description.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The narrative simplicity of Memoir of an Imaginary Friend would lead one to believe that this is a children's book but the complexity of the issues being put forth definitely place it in the teen/adult category. Friendship, sacrifice, mortality and coping with "being different" are the primary themes that run through this novel.

Although never articulated, it is obvious from his impaired social interaction and communication skills and his restricted and repetitive behavior that 3rd grader Max Delaney is suffering from a high functioning form of autism. Max is intelligent and perceptive but not able to socially interact with the people around him so he has created Budo his imaginary friend, and the narrator of this story, to help him cope with the decisions of daily life.

Memoir is a magical tale filled with a bevy of heartwarming and extraordinarily conceived characters coupled with enough uncertainty and tension to keep the reader captivated. Since Budo is a product of Max's fertile imagination, the perceptions presented are simplistic and innocent yet possess intelligent commentary and observations on questions that confront most of us in our everyday lives. In their quest to help Max, Budo and other "imaginaries" like Oswald the Giant and Teeny the Fairy become the sort of honest, protective, understanding and unselfish friends that we all would like to have by our side as we navigate through the messy predicaments and choices life throws at us. (Perhaps for adults our imaginary friend is called Conscience and maybe like Peter Pan's Tinkerbell and Max's Budo it will disappear if we stop believing in it.)

On the whole, I enjoyed the story of Max, Budo and friends once I got used to the childlike presentation, but I must admit I could have done without the repetitive references to subjects like bonus poops. 3 1/2 stars
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By C. M. Collier VINE VOICE on 21 Feb. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I don't think I've ever read a book like this before,as it's written by an imaginary friend,and as he goes through his life with his friend Max he meets lots of other imaginary friends who all look different,as they look the way their children design them,and often they have no ears and cannot hear,or have no eyebrows because their kids forget them.
Imaginary friends cannot be hurt,and the only way they can die is if someone stops believing in them. Budo,who writes this story,has been alive longer than most because Max is special and really needs him.When Max disappears Budo is the only one who knows where he is,but he can't make anyone understand.Budo has to call on the other imaginary friends to help,and the story became so engrossing for me I couldn't put it down.
It's funny,exciting,sad and interesting,and I would definitely recommend it!
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Budo is Max's imaginary friend. Max is 8 years old and Budo is 5. 5 is ancient for an imaginary friend because they usually go away in kindergarten. But Max isn't like most children. Max is special. He doesn't like to be touched, he likes other children to stay away and he likes to make battles with his Lego and Star Wars figures. When Max disappears from school one day it is up to Budo to save him.

Told from a child-like perspective, it does have similarities to 'Room,' and 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,' but like both those books it also is totally original. It is a very easy to read book as you want to find out what has happened to Max and how Budo's friends (other imaginary friends) can help. Highly recommended.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By DubaiReader VINE VOICE on 19 Jun. 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was surprised to find that the author wrote this book for an adult audience, and although I realise that the narrative voice was only nine years old, I found the simplistic style too much. The repetition of Budo's fears of 'disappearing' became tedious in the extreme and the reference to the 'pooping on the head' incident, frankly, irritating.

Budo is Max's Imaginary Friend. He has been an Imaginary Friend now for five years, an incredibly long time for an Imaginary Friend to survive. This may be due to the fact that Max appears to be autistic and can relate to Budo but not to the other children and adults who surround him. He needs Budo to help him navigate the outside world. Max is a highly intelligent child and as a result, Budo is also intelligent. Max has not imagined him needing to sleep, so Budo stays up all night with Max's parents, or visiting within a limited range of Max's house. Other Imaginary Friends exist and Budo can talk with them, but for the most part they are short lived and less developed than Budo.
This scene-setting part of the novel was an interesting view into the life of an autistic boy and his life in school. His interactions with his parents, teachers and fellow students were fascinating.
Then the novel took on a more thrilleresque nature and became more unbelievable. As another reviewer noted, it felt like a copy from a similar, recently popular book. This, added to my growing annoyance with the repetitions noted in my opening comments, made the book a struggle to complete.

My book group gave it 4 stars, but I was less keen, 3 (3 1/2) stars for me. However, in preparation for the meeting, I read a few interviews with the author and I would be happy to try one of his other books at some time.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback