FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Memoirs of Field Mars... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Memoirs of Field Marshal Montgomery Paperback – 30 Nov 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£19.99
£14.22 £12.18
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£19.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The Memoirs of Field Marshal Montgomery
  • +
  • Alanbrooke War Diaries 1939-1945: Field Marshall Lord Alanbrooke
Total price: £38.98
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 574 pages
  • Publisher: Leo Cooper Ltd (30 Nov. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844153304
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844153305
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 15.2 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 139,472 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 19 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
A recent discussion on the History forum brought home to me how little the course of the war in northern Europe is understood in this country. Insidiously we have come to accept the American version, that the British played only a support role, Montgomery was a lag-along general, and his one big venture - Arnhem - was a disaster of his own making.

Though it obviously needs to be treated as a primary source rather than history per se, this book is essential to comprehension of those events - especially as it reproduces many of the original memos, orders etc of the time. The picture that emerges is of a High Command crippled by political sensibilities; unable or unwilling to control headstrong generals; lacking strategic sense; and refusing to look beyond Germany's defeat to the problem posed by Russia. The cost in life and in the western powers' post-war position was immense.

In fact, though Montgomery says lots of warm and apparently genuine things about him, it's hard to escape the conclusion that Eisenhower (however good a politician) was a military incompetent.

The book also deals with the earlier war years, though not in great detail: several times Monty refers the reader to his previous publication on those campaigns, 'El Alamein to the River Sangro'. In fact the emphasis all round is on what happened in meetings and conferences rather than on the battlefield.

It is not an indulgent read; the style is as clipped and military as you would expect, though surprisingly engaging if you buy into the 'Monty' persona. Anyone who doesn't might find this as irritating as crumbs in bed. And it ends with his rather chilling vision of the future, and the need to allow ourselves to be annihilated, if necessary, to preserve our cherished British way of life.
6 Comments 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was listening to the radio a couple of weeks ago to a discussion about Montgomery-and was struck by his orders on arriving to take over the demoralised Eighth Army...."...we will move the entire army here....and here we will stay. If we cannot stay here alive then we shall stay here dead..."
I now have a much better understanding of him and indeed his genius-for that is what he was. Slandered by a heavily biased American view of WW2 in fact he was probably the best British/American senior commander who was very clear minded in his thinking and strategy and knew what needed to be done to defeat his german opponents. Most brilliantly he recognised the limitations of the forces at his disposal and adapted his tactics and strategy accordingly whilst working tirelessly to improve the morale and fighting quality of his forces. Appalled by the lack of engagement of the WW1 generals-he never once saw one as a junior infantry officer- and the very heavy casulties he was determined that his men-and the country-should know him and what he expected of them-which was to win and to go home with the lowest possible casulties. The only divisional commander to come back from Dunkirk with his men and their equipment he counselled against the Dieppe raid on the grounds that a previous cancellation had inevitably meant the loss of surprise. He commanded all allies forces on D-day and the breakout from Normandy-critically deliberately placing the British/Canadian forces opposed to the main bulk of the german armour which allowed the Americans (as he planned) to breakout to the west of them.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A wonderful walk through Montys life and career. This book does not go into the details of the many battles that he was involved in as he has already written about them in his other books, instead he covers more of the strategic aims of the war.
He is remarkably honest about his interactions with other members of the military organisations that he worked for and alongside, especially Sir Winston Churchill and President Eisenhower.
I found it a very entertaining and informative book, especially towards the end when he looks at NATO and how the European countries interact with each other. It seems that things have changed little in the last fifty years.
The only downside was the price, i do feel that for a kindle edition it was quite expensive.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
cracking book. by far the best account ive read on issues involved. monty gives a very fair analysis on all battles ad people involved. Very highly recommended
3 Comments 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
In his own inimitable way, Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery relates his life as a soldier in service to his country -- both in peace and during the First and Second World Wars --- which lasted 50 years (1908--58).

Born in Britain in 1887, Montgomery spent his early years in Tasmania, where his father, an Anglican priest, worked for a time. While Montgomery considered his father one of the prime influences in his life (along with his wife, Winston Churchill, and Dwight Eisenhower), he makes clear that there was no love lost between him and his mother, who showed him little care and affection as a child. Indeed, she would more often give him a hard time than not.

While Montgomery mainly speaks about his military career and the people who played key roles in said career, he speaks (albeit briefly) with deep love of his wife and son David.

All in all, an interesting memoir.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback