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Melting Pot: Remastered

4.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (28 Jan. 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Stax
  • ASIN: B000056K5H
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 563,347 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

melting potbooker t. and the mg's (artista) | formato: audio cddescrizione prodottodescrizionebrani1.melting pot2.back home3.chicken pox4.fuquawi5.kinda easy like6.hi ride7.l.a. jazz song8.sunny monday9.multimedia-track

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
In all honesty, their aren't enough stars to rate this stellar album. Unfortunately the last by these four members of Booker T. & the MGs. Booker T. Jones plays his B-3 organ with unbelievable fire and passion. Steve Cropper's rhythm and lead guitar is just unrivaled. Duck Dunn lays down some of his most inspiring bass lines ever, and as always, the perfect time keeping of the great Al Jackson, Jr. on drums makes this album a sonic delight from beginning to end. It opens with, in my opinion, the greatest piece of music ever recorded, the title cut, "Melting Pot". From start to finish it is perhaps, the most fitting example of each member's equal contribution to the sound and soul of the band. Four guys doing four distinctive things, with it all coming together like magic, and all the while, none of them having enough of an ego to detract from the other. Tragic circumstances made this the last outing by these four, and the direction they were going in here, makes it all the more tragic. However, this was certainly a perfect crowning achievement for the group. Not many bands can go out as they came in. On fire.
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Format: Audio CD
At the risk of being accused of hyperbole, I can honestly say that the track "Melting Pot" is the finest piece of music I've ever heard. There simply are not words (at least not in my lexicon) to describe its sublime brilliance. I could mention the incredibly strong melody, its sophisticated big-city feel, the awesome interplay between Booker T's Hammond and Steve Cropper's guitar underpinned by Dunn's bass and the genuinely unique presence of Jackson's drumming, but that would still not begin to do it justice. I fell in love with this track (and the rest of the album - especially "Fuquawi" and "Kinda Easy Like") just over 30 years ago now (the album was about three years old at the time and already deleted - ridiculously enough). I've heard a great deal of amazing music since then, both new and old, but absolutely nothing touches this. In my opinion this is far and away the best album Booker T and the MGs ever made. The reviewer who said they went out in a blaze of unsung glory with this is absolutely right. They (and this album in particular) are still underrated, but at least the group have had some serious recognition now, and all or most of their material is available. Their music should live on forever.
.................................
**Added to review in October 2013 by A P Monblat**: ten years on and my enthusiasm for this album - and the title track above all - has not dimmed or diminished one iota, so here is an additional attempt to put into words the brilliance of this piece. I think epithets like passion, majesty and drama are needed to describe what is constantly in play in the music. Booker T Jones and Steve Cropper together spent the entire 1960s crafting respectively some of the tightest, funkiest Hammond organ and guitar sounds ever recorded.
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Format: Audio CD
In all honesty, there aren't enough stars to rate this stellar album. Unfortunately, the last by these four members of Booker T. & the MGs. Booker T. Jones plays his B-3 organ with unbelievable fire and passion. Steve Cropper's rhythm and lead guitar is just unrivaled. Duck Dunn lays down some of his most inspiring bass lines ever, and as always, the perfect time keeping of the great Al Jackson, Jr. on drums makes this album a sonic delight from beginning to end. It opens with, in my opinion, the greatest piece of music ever recorded, the title cut, "Melting Pot". From start to finish it is perhaps, the most fitting example of each member's equal contribution to the sound and soul of the band. Four guys doing four distinctive things, with it all coming together like magic, and all the while, none of them having enough of an ego to detract from the other. Tragic circumstances made this the last outing by these four, and the direction they were going in here makes it all the more tragic. However, this was certainly a perfect crowning achievement for the group. Not many bands can go out as they came in. On fire
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Format: Audio CD
This was the last album by the classic lineup of Booker T and the MG's: Booker T. Jones, Steve Cropper, Donald "Duck" Dunn and Al Jackson. The merely curious might be expecting that the band chiefly famous for 'Green Onions' and for the music to the BBC's cricket coverage would be one-hit wonders, who can't sustain interest over the course of a whole album. After all, what we are talking about here are instrumental tracks by the Stax Records house band, a combo that specialised in backing singers like Otis Redding and Wilson Pickett. In fact, the band is a lot better than merely listenable. Walk down the street with this on your earphones and you can feel like the star of your own personal blaxploitation movie.

There isn't a bad track on the album, but there are many standouts. One is the epic 8-minute title track, which hangs on one groove for so long that it becomes truly hypnotic, as well as featuring classic drum breaks by the late Al Jackson. 'Back Home' is a jubilant high-speed stomper with a tender slow blues in the middle. The charmingly titled 'Chicken Pox' has a wicked loping B-boy groove and even more great breaks. The playing is all top-notch; Booker T. Jones can seemingly play anything, Steve Cropper's jabbing guitar is always just right, "Duck" Dunn's bass is equally nimble and Al Jackson may actually have been, as Cropper put it, 'the greatest drummer who ever lived'.

The Booker T beginner should probably get a compilation, such as Stax's 'Very Best of', which has a generous sample of tracks from the band's lifetime. But once you get the bug for this band, you start to want everything they did. Some is out of print, and some of what's in print is less than essential. But for sheer infectious rhythmic exuberance, it's very hard to beat Booker T and the MG's. Motown's house band, the Funk Brothers, were great; but Booker T and the MG's were that little bit more down, dirty and nasty.
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