Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Media Ethics and Self-regulation Paperback – 27 Apr 2000

3.1 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£9.99 £0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:


Are You an Author Looking to Publish Your Book?
It's Free, Fast, and Easy to Publish to Kindle, Print and Audio with Amazon Independent Publishing Learn more
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Longman; 1 edition (27 April 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0582306051
  • ISBN-13: 978-0582306059
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 15.2 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,157,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

(front cover)
Media Ethics and Self Regulation
Chris Frost
Longman logo
(spine)
Media Ethics and Self Regulation
Frost
Longman logo
(back cover)
Media Ethics and Self Regulation
Chris Frost
The British press has been accused of drinking in the Last Chance Saloon. Now, with the coming of the new millennium, many fear that broadcasters are also getting a taste for the commercially-popular cocktail of sensation and intrusion that it sells.
But does it have to be like that? Are journalists doomed to ignore stories about important public interest issues in favour of titillating tales that pander solely to the public’s prurient curiosity? Are docusoaps and current affairs series based on questionable evidence replacing the award-winning documentary programmes of past years?
Media Ethics and Self Regulation looks closely at the moral dilemmas facing journalists in their day-to-day working lives and examines the self-regulatory bodies that police the various codes of practice.
The codes of practice are described in detail, considering whether in fact they do protect the people they claim to protect and how journalists can apply the codes in their working lives.
This book has been written for students and trainee journalists, working journalists and editors, and indeed for any student of the media.
Its accessible style and use of examples and case studies will help readers debate media ethics, analyse whether the media is capable of self regulation and evaluate the philosophical principles that underpin media codes of conduct.
Chris Frost is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Journalism at the University of Central Lancashire. In a journalistic career that spans more than 25 years, he has worked as a journalist and editor before turning to teaching. He is Chair of the National Union of Journalists’ Ethics Council, a member of the National Council of the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom, a former NUJ president and a former member of the Press Council. He has lectured extensively on media ethics world-wide.
Longman logo

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 18 Mar. 2001
Format: Paperback
I remember this time last year when I was studying journalism at the University of Central Lancashire. I'd left all my work really late and was having a right old stress about it. Having not attended many of the lectures, I had to try and learn the whole course in about 3 hours - it was an absolute nightmare. One of my friends lent me this book and thank god they did! It is the easiest book to understand on this topic and I was able to locate the relevant information pretty easily. The book is totally aimed at students studying ethics and that's why its an ideal book to use for essays. I do reckon it's a bit pricey but it's worth it because I probably would have failed without it. And what happened to me? Well I passed my journalism degree and now I work on a top national daily newspaper - can't be bad!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Media Ethics is a massive subject and you need more than one book to be able to grasp a true understanding of the topic. Frost's book is a misguided attempt to try and put issues into laymans terms. But I'm afraid that can't be done. No attempt is made to link modern ethical issues like 'the individual's right to privacy' with ancient teachings on ethics.' My fear is that new students will walk away from this book thinking that Media Ethics is an entirely modern concept. Chris Frost is a good lecturer - I should know, I've been to a few of his lectures - but in his attempt to simplify the subject, he has created a flawed book which only scrapes the surface.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 31 Oct. 2000
Format: Paperback
Like the others, I also used this book on my course. All I can say is that it must have worked because I came out with a first class honours! To be perfectly honest, I think there is very little to choose between a lot of ethics books. The important thing is to get a taste of a few of them and then draw your own conclusions - that's what you will get the marks for. To this end, the Chris Frost book is as good as any but if you're a poor, hard up student, it might be worth getting it from a library rather than stumping up the cash yourself!
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 8 April 2001
Format: Paperback
Don't bother getting this book. I think it's overpriced and patronising. I looked through the whole book looking for decent quotes to put in my essay and didn't find any. Chris Frost seems to stumble from subject to subject with no real method to his madness. The book never seems clear about what its trying to say and will have you ripping your hair out when you are trying to find out specific information. They say you shouldn't judge a book by its cover but in this case you'd be well advised to. The content is just as shabby as the cheap looking cover.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback