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Mrs McGinty's Dead (Poirot) (Hercule Poirot Series Book 28) by [Christie, Agatha]
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Mrs McGinty's Dead (Poirot) (Hercule Poirot Series Book 28) Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

‘So simple, so economical, so completely baffling. Every clue scrupulously given, with superb sleight of hand.’
Sunday Times

‘The plot is perfect and the characters are wonderful.’
San Francisco Chronicle

‘The best Poirot since such pre-war classics as Cards on the Table.’
New York Times

From the Back Cover

Mrs. McGinty died from a brutal blow to the back of her head. Suspicion falls immediately on her shifty lodger, James Bentley, whose clothes reveal traces of the victim s blood and hair. Yet something is amiss: Bentley just doesn t seem like a murderer.

Could the answer lie in an article clipped from a newspaper two days before the death? With a desperate killer still free, Hercule Poirot will have to stay alive long enough to find out. . . ."


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 873 KB
  • Print Length: 244 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (14 Oct. 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0046RE5EK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #22,030 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Hercule Poirot is feeling bored, so he is delighted when he is visited by his old friend Superintendent Spence of the Kilchester Police. Spence has recently been in charge of murder case, an old charwoman, Mrs McGinty, has been brutally bludgeoned to death. Her lodger, James Bentley, has been convicted of her murder and is due to hang. But Spence is convinced Bentley didn't do it, and he wants Poirot to find out who did.
So Poirot goes to stay in the village of Broadhinny, where the grizzly deed was done, and he soon begins to uncover reasons why other people might have wanted Mrs McGinty dead. While striving to discover the real murderer, he also has to cope with the appalling conditions at the truly terrible 'guest house' he is staying at. The Summerhayes, whose house it is, have no idea how to run a guest house, nor even how to prepare an edible meal.
The scenes where Poirot's sufferings at the Summerhayes's horrible guest house are described are among the funniest in the book, which is replete with humour. There are many interesting characters, especially the scatty but charming Maureen Summerhayes, whom Poirot likes in spite of her atrocious cooking. The character of the convicted murderer Jame Bentley is particularly good, he is utterly unprepossesing, which makes Poirot all the more determined to prove him innocent.
The best exchange in this very entertaining book comes near the end:' "Bon Dieu, how stupid I have been" said Hercule Poirot. "The whole thing is simple, is it not?" It was after that remark that there was very nearly another murder - the murder of Hercule Poirot by Superintendent Spence'. Enjoy it.
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Format: Audio CD
Hugh Fraser is a master at the art of narrating the audio book. I have never heard anybody as good as he is, and he is very good in this particular one, perhaps because 'Mrs. McGinty's Dead' contains quite a bit of comedy, and he excels at this. The voice he gives to Mrs. Ariadne Oliver, Agatha Christie's alter ego, is quite convincing, but he has a huge variety of different voices upon which to draw for various characters, including Poirot himself. If you are after an audio book do give Mr. Fraser a try - you won't regret it. He is excellent company and I guarantee that you will be back for more.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When Mrs McGinty, the charwoman/housekeeper in a small village, is found dead the obvious suspect is her lodger James Bentley who is convicted and sentenced to hang. However Superintendent Spence is not convinced of his guilt and calls in Poirot to re-investigate; wise move!
Hercule Poirot duly visits the local residents and uncovers cupboards full of secrets in his search for the truth. It seems Mrs McGinty's snooping uncovered a dark and deadly secret, which proved fatal for her.
There's plenty of clues and mis-direction along the way as Poirot uncovers the truth in his usual inimitable style. The character of Ariadne Oliver also appears once more, an intriguing self-portrait of Agatha Christie herself. Unlike some, I found her humorous rather than grating. Poirot is such a great character, and here he is laid bare with his sharp and incisive mind and his vanity on display in equal measure.
A good story told in the no-nonsense Agatha Christie style.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My favourite of her books (and I'm a fan). Amusingly and colloquially written. I love the theme: what happens to the people in famous murder cases? This is presented through a "where are they now" in a tabloid of the day, with Poirot interviewing a jolly woman writer who looks incapable of turning out the sentimentality she lives by. Poor Poirot is lodging with one of the worst cooks he's ever met - in gratitude he teaches her how to make an omelette. Mrs Oliver turns up, throwing apples right and left. She's staying with a playwright who is butchering one of her novels for the stage. Poirot finds an unlikely helper in a rather vulgar girl who works for an estate agent and the post mistress thinks the worst. Is he "making certain suggestions"?
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Although this isn't my favourite Poirot, it is still good. A char-woman gets murdered and her lodger is sentenced to death for her murder. The leading detective has doubts and asks Poirot to investigate. He goes to a small village called Broadhinney where secrets are plentifull. Here Poirot investigates and finds what.... Read and find out. You will not be disappointed.

Nice easy read. Would recommend.
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Format: Paperback
It's been quite a while since I last read an Agatha Christie novel and I'm pleased by what I got on my return to the world of Hercule Poirot and Ariadne Oliver. When the police arrest a man they believe to be innocent, yet to whom all the evidence points, they call on an elderly Poirot to find the truth.

It's a classically complex tale of a rich tapestry of suspects and clues which could point various directions, and which had me fairly baffled almost throughout. At one point I did suspect the truth but only fleetingly amongst a number of other possibilities that I was bombarded with.

This is one of the examples of a novel that Christie has filled with humour, often making herself the butt of the joke, and the amusement it gave nicely balances parts that could come across as brutal (although perhaps not compared to crime novels of the modern day). The comedy absolutely makes the book, and I really loved this aspect, which is often forgotten, of her writing.
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