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Maybe in Paris by [Christiansen, Rebecca]
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Length: 224 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

-Set against the magic and possibility of Paris, Christiansen's emotional debut not only reminds us of the challenges that come with loving someone as they are, but also, the incomparable beauty.- --Ashley Herring Blake, author of How to Make a Wish
-A touching, relevant story about siblings, autism, and unconditional love. Beautifully written, compelling, and honest.- --Marci Lyn Curtis, author of The One Thing
-Readers will swoon over the delicious descriptions of Paris . . . but will ultimately find that Keira's emotional journey covers even more ground than her physical one, in a story that focuses on a complex, yet tender, sibling relationship.- --Jen Malone, author of Wanderlost
-Maybe in Paris captures all the excitement of youthful obsession--with a city or a boy--while offering a touching depiction of the bonds we too often take for granted. Few books about teen sibling relationships capture their ups and painful downs so frankly.- --Margot Harrison, author of The Killer in Me
-Heartbreaking but hopeful, Maybe in Paris is a wonderful debut with a beautiful setting, complicated, yet realistic sibling relationship, and a dash of romance.- --Chantele Sedgwick, author of Love, Lucas and Switching Gears
-Good YA depends on great voice, and Rebecca Christiansen brings it to bear. She announces herself as a voice to be reckoned with in the very first pages of Maybe in Paris and doesn't relent. A welcome debut sure to launch a million fans.- --Tom Leveen, author of Shackled and Random

"Set against the magic and possibility of Paris, Christiansen's emotional debut not only reminds us of the challenges that come with loving someone as they are, but also, the incomparable beauty." --Ashley Herring Blake, author of How to Make a Wish

"A touching, relevant story about siblings, autism, and unconditional love. Beautifully written, compelling, and honest." --Marci Lyn Curtis, author of The One Thing

"Readers will swoon over the delicious descriptions of Paris . . . but will ultimately find that Keira's emotional journey covers even more ground than her physical one, in a story that focuses on a complex, yet tender, sibling relationship." --Jen Malone, author of Wanderlost

"Maybe in Paris captures all the excitement of youthful obsession--with a city or a boy--while offering a touching depiction of the bonds we too often take for granted. Few books about teen sibling relationships capture their ups and painful downs so frankly." --Margot Harrison, author of The Killer in Me

"Heartbreaking but hopeful, Maybe in Paris is a wonderful debut with a beautiful setting, complicated, yet realistic sibling relationship, and a dash of romance." --Chantele Sedgwick, author of Love, Lucas and Switching Gears

"Good YA depends on great voice, and Rebecca Christiansen brings it to bear. She announces herself as a voice to be reckoned with in the very first pages of Maybe in Paris and doesn't relent. A welcome debut sure to launch a million fans." --Tom Leveen, author of Shackled and Random

About the Author

Rebecca Christiansen tried to study creative writing at university, but kept skipping classes to write YA novels in the library, so she decided to pursue that instead. She loves boy bands and diet soda and suffers from incurable wanderlust. Rebecca lives with her boyfriend in a house packed full of books in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1300 KB
  • Print Length: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Sky Pony Press (20 Jun. 2017)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01MS2PQAO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Setting, but the Plot and Characters Fall Short 18 July 2017
By Kelly Gunderman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This review originally appeared on herestohappyendings.com.

Maybe in Paris was the kind of book that had a really strong premise, and I expected a lot from it. As a book that features a character on the Autism spectrum, I really hoped for the best here, because there aren't enough books out there that accurately portray autism. My almost eight year old daughter was diagnosed with Autism when she was three, so I get it, I do. And this was not what I was hoping for. This book just didn't really display autism in a positive light, and I'm going to talk more about this later on in my review.

Keira has always wanted to go to Paris. She loves everything to do with it and spends her time obsessing over French culture - including dressing as Marie Antoinette for prom. In fact, she loves it so much, she has had a crush on a French exchange student all year, and is planning a trip to go to Paris during the summer. She has saved up a lot of money to make her dream come true, and is just about to go, when something unthinkable happens - her autistic younger brother, Levi, tries to kill himself.

She finds herself upset that she cannot go to Paris now, not when her brother is in the hospital and clearly needs to be looked after. But then she comes up with a great idea - why not try and help cheer Levi up by asking if he would like to go to Paris with her?

"Levi and I have something in common. We both want to leave this place. The only difference is that I want to come back. I want to shepherd him out into the world, show him how beautiful it is, and come home again carrying sparks inside us. Maybe if she sees the world, sees everything it has to offer in a brand-new corner of it, he'll want to stay in it."

While Keria's motives are good, she isn't sure their mother will let her take him with her. However, once he receives the green light from his doctors, their mother reluctantly decides to give her a chance.

Once they get to Paris, it isn't what Keira was expecting, however - Levi doesn't have any interest in doing the things she has planned for them. He doesn't want to visit museums, or eat at a French café - instead, he wants to stay in the hotel room and eat at McDonald's. When the two of them do go out and explore, Keira is upset by Levi's reactions to everything - he is distant and uninterested, and constantly insults both Keira and the things she likes.

When Keira meets a guy, things change for her - she is instantly falling for him and starts leaving Levi behind in the hotel room to go and do things with him instead of Levi, not even noticing that Levi isn't doing so well and that he is upset about things. When something serious happens, Keira is forced to look at things in a new light.

I really wanted to like this book. I absolutely love books that focus on travel, and I thought that a book that takes place in Paris with a young girl and her autistic brother could be a really fantastic read. Paris is somewhere I would absolutely love to go one day, and that part of the book was amazing - the author did a fantastic job talking about the sights in Paris, the delicious food, and the way she painted the picture of a quaint little bakery that Keira and Levi visited every morning made me fall in love with that aspect of this. I just wish my love for this could have carried on a little bit further than just the setting.

I absolutely hated Keira and Levi's mom. I mean, for starters, she seriously called Keria a slut in the beginning of the book, and she is constantly telling her daughter (her daughter!) how much of a failure she is, no matter what she does. Whether it's falling for a guy who doesn't like her back or dreaming of going on vacation - everything single thing is wrong. It drove me crazy. I hated the relationship that they had - it wasn't healthy for Keira to constantly been told that she will never be good enough. At least her stepdad, Josh, was a pretty awesome guy. He made sure to make Keria feel loved, even when her mother didn't.

Another thing I had a hard time really liking about the book was Keira's character. She was incredibly self-centered and really didn't seem like she had anyone except her own best interests at heart. She does have a few instances where she actually appears to care about Levi, such as when she actually asked him to go to Paris with her, but they seem far and few in between. I mean, honestly - who takes their autistic brother to Paris and leaves him alone in a hotel room while they hang out with a random guy? Yeah. Well, Keira does. At least I can say that she does seem to grow up a bit by the end of the book, finally realizing that she's being a bit selfish and starts to come to terms with her family life.

Speaking of Keira's autistic brother, Levi, we are informed in the beginning of the book that he has autism, the possibility of schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Not only that, but he wasn't diagnosed with any of this until he was sixteen years old. So...his parents never really paid attention to any of this, or else they were really just that clueless? I don't know, but seriously, how can you not tell your child has possible mental disorders, and just continue on with your life until that child is sixteen years old? I had thoughts about my daughter's socialization and development when she was only two, so not really sure how you manage to ignore that for such a long time. Sure, there are instances of this happening I guess, but the way that Levi's conditions were referred to in this book made it obvious that he has had issues way before the present, so why weren't they looked into?

All in all, I thought this was a nice read for summer, even if it's for the setting of the book alone. I do think that the way Keira and Levi's mother treat Keira is horrible, and that Keira needed to grow up a bit more, but other than that, the book does have its upside.

Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!
1.0 out of 5 stars Ableist Main Character, Disappointing Plot 21 July 2017
By Tracie Nicole - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Everyone, there were so many things I hated about this book.

First, I want to preface this review by saying that I do not have a lot of experience with people on the Autism Spectrum. Therefore, I will not be commenting on the author’s representation of Autism. I will also not be commenting on the representation of mental illness because everyone’s experience and interpretation of mental illness is different depending on many things.

My main issue with this story was the characters. In a story that deals with heavy situations such as this one, you should have a main character that understands, tries their best, and learns from their mistakes. However, I didn’t see any of that from Keira. Not only was she very ableist, but she didn’t care a stich about her brother (even though the author tried to spin it that way in the end), and she was extremely immature and hypocritical.

Let me give you some quotes for her ableism…

“You picture Hollywood mental hospitals, patients drooling in straightjackets”.

“I can’t believe my brother could be that far gone”. Um…no. Your brother’s diagnoses give you no right to say that about him. That’s so terrible to say.

“Don’t psychiatric drugs turn you into a zombie?” Oh heck no. I’m sorry but also not okay. Some people use prescriptions for medication to HELP them have a handle on their illness…

Next was her penchant for being hypocritical, immature and pretentious. She acted like she was all that. She was the closest thing to be French without…you know…actually being French. And she knew exactly how to take care of her brother and help with his needs…Except she didn’t.

She could have seriously done a lot of damage to her brother, more than him leaving and getting lost. He could have gotten sick without his meds being monitored, he could have gotten hurt…A lot of things could have happened because she couldn’t watch over her brother properly. Because she had to go after every boy in Paris she took even a small fancy to. And she saw that when he left, but I don’t think she learned her lesson at all. That whole ending part seemed very staged to me. I didn’t feel bad for her at all. In fact, I was happy every time a boy broke her heart… Even though she learned nothing from it.

Which brings me to the next point. She was so immature and pretentious. She would go after almost every boy she saw, and judge him based on his appearance and what he could do for her. And in each of these instances, when they shunned her, she had something bad to say. Then she would feel so sorry for leaving her brother for some guy in a foreign country who she didn't even know. And she acted like she was going on adventures. What is she? Like 14? She is supposed to be 18 in this book. She didn’t even realize how dangerous that was. Going off with people she didn’t even know. Then, in the beginning, she had to comment on the French skills of the other tourists and make fun of them. Yet, when her own French was made fun of by a Frenchman, she got all offended. Can I scream hypocrite loud enough?

She was also so selfish. It was all about what Kiera wanted to do and who Kiera wanted to see. I can’t think of an instance when Levi got to do what he wanted. When she didn’t get her way, she was all sad or she pitched a fit like a 5 year old, bending Levi to her will.

The only characters I liked in the whole book were Levi (who actually had more of a head on his shoulders than his sister), their stepfather Josh, who actually had useful ideas and who was nice, and the bakeshop siblings. I hated the mom. She was manipulative and controlling, completely obsessive and she was so mean to her daughter, but sweet as pie to Levi.
5.0 out of 5 stars especially in the hands of a writer like Rebecca Christiansen 18 July 2017
By Corabel Shofner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Paris never gets old, especially in the hands of a writer like Rebecca Christiansen. Definitely read this one.
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