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May We Be Forgiven Audiobook – Unabridged

3.7 out of 5 stars 328 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 19 hours and 46 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 23 Oct. 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B009V9BV0E
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This Book Will Save Your Life is one of my favourite books of recent years. It was fresh, light hearted, different. It gave you a word full of hope and promise.

When I read the first chunk of May We Be Forgiven at the end of TBWSYL I couldn't wait to read the rest. What should have been, could have been an interesting take on rebuilding a broken life instead ended up being sentimental, borderline racist crap.

We have another divorced middle aged lonely New York Jewish man with a convenient never ending supply of cash. This one is an author and a teacher who can take time off willy nilly and makes everyone he comes into contact with happy.
Child abuse is swept under the table, someone pretty much gets away with murder, laser tag is played but this time it's sexy, we have funny foreign people and doughnuts get a brief mention.

Oh and there is Nixon, lots and lots of Nixon.

It's an easy enough read but at times it is a slog. It's too perfect, it relies too much on unlikely coincidences. Any conflicts are too easily resolved or are resolved in a ridiculous fashion.

TBWSYL made me want to change my life, it made me want to change the world. This just left me feeling empty, cheated almost.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This family drama of sorts takes place within the space of two Thanksgivings, involving a 30-something Nixon scholar/professor, Harold, and his TV executive younger brother, George's family in the upper class New York suburban county of Westchester. One might be fooled into thinking that this would be the perfect setting for a typical American family drama, but if the author's claim to fame in an earlier novel, The End of Alice (with a pedophile as a main character), is anything to go by, one's expectations is swiftly thwarted by Harold's affair with George's wife, Jane, which ends more than badly when George, already committed for a breakdown after he is involved in a fatal accident, finds the pair in bed.

This sets in motion a chain of events, though wildly ludicrous, becomes strangely plausible in the farcical story world that Homes has created. When Harold finds his own marriage end almost immediately, and he is entrusted with the care of his precocious nephew Nate and niece Ashley. Harold is predictably unprepared for this role, but rather than stumble along goofily in the all-American comedic manner, Harold stumbles along goofily in a darker shade of comedy. He hooks up with a nymphomaniac soccer mom Cheryl while dallying with salacious online dating sites on his brother's computer, who just so happens to be a distant relative of Julie Eisenhower, Nixon's daughter, and who also happens to have some boxes of his father's unpublished stories, thus feeding the Nixon-scholar part of his personality. Somehow he also gets involved sexually with an emotionally-unavailable woman, who may nor may not be the missing girl in the community.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read this book for book club, pushing me out of my comfort zone. I did not enjoy it, or understand where it was going for 80% of the book, but I was determined to finish it and I am glad I did. It was a random collection of weird events that somehow ends up making a story that was compelling and pulled together at the very end. Not sue I would read anything else by Homes, but never say never.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a bookclub choice, not my choice, not my fav book, but ok. I wanted to like 'a' to character in the book but it was not to be.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"May we be forgiven" traces the changes the main character undergoes when he is catapulted into an entirely different life than the one he has laid out for himself. Harry appears happy with his professorship and his marriage to a career-focused woman, his rather theoretical intent to write the book to change all books on Richard Nixon the only interest in his life. Dramatic events where he is not entirely blameless turn his life upside down overnight, and Harry finds himself in charge of an ever expanding family. He has to crash-learn new life skills to keep everyone together and discovers a new, more connected and happier self on the way.

While reading I felt as if peering in through the window rather than living through events with Harry, in his head and skin. I did not get to know him well enough to root for him all the way; I followed events as a mere bystander, watching what happens next. And a lot does happen, so it is still a worthwhile read - one I will remember for certain events rather than the main character.
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By Marand TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 April 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this for my book group, the book having been chosen because it won the Women's Prize for Fiction in 2013, beating Zadie Smith, Hilary Mantel & Barbara Kingsolver amongst others on the short list. In our group the book met with very mixed reactions: some hated it, some started off hating and grew to like it, more started off enjoying it and then found they lost their interest as the book progressed - it certainly provoked plenty of discussion.

I found the prose style to be exhilarating and the opening section is very strong. There is plenty of well-aimed satire on middle class life in the USA & the American Dream. There is some searingly black humour as more and more bad things happen to the characters. In many ways the book reminded me of the US TV series 'Soap'. Some reviewers have mentioned the saccharine ending but I wondered if even that was part of the joke given the American predilection for schmaltzy, happy, upbeat endings. Undoubtedly the plot is implausible at times and I never found the character of Harry, the main protagonist, a downbeat Nixon scholar, to be entirely convincing. Nixon and his downfall act as a metaphor for the failings of the American Dream and America's place in the world: " He was the perfect storm of present, past, and future, of integrity and deceit, of moral superiority and arrogance, of the drug that was and is the American Dream, wanting more, wanting to have what someone else has, wanting to have it all".
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