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The Mars Mystery: A Tale of the End of Two Worlds Hardcover – 31 Dec 1999

3.5 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 31 Dec 1999
£20.63
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Century (31 Dec. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0434002534
  • ISBN-13: 978-0434002535
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,416,400 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Graham Hancock's books are almost guaranteed to be both controversial and entertaining. I loved Fingerprints of the Gods & couldn't tear myself away from Keeper of Genesis, however, I must admit that the Mars mystery was a big disappointment in terms of a believeable theory. Graham Hancock makes several valid points regarding the dangers of asteroid or coment impact but his suggestion that Mars was home to an intelligent civilisation wiped out by a rogue comet is very doubtful to say the least. On the other hand I'd be lying if I said I didn't enjoy reading this - if only for entertainment value. As someone once said "It's important to keep an open mind..but not so open that all your brains fall out".
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Format: Hardcover
The book has the names of three people on the cover, and would appear to have been written separately by all three and then shuffled together with no particular care.
The thrust of the book is in two parts, with an underlying subtext. The first part of the book is a "review" (biased from the outset) of the Cydonia artefacts. While the authors are at pains later in the book to stress they are not advocating the artefacts are of artificial origin, their writing points entirely in the opposite direction, citing government cover-ups, deliberate sabotaging of multi-million dollar missions to Mars (Mars Observer) and mounting none-to subtle character attacks on the likes of Daniel Goldin, Michael Malin of Malin Space Systems (operaters of the Mars Observer and now the Mars Global Surveyor) and even Carl Sagan. While in later chapters the authors half-heartedly withdraw some of their earlier accusations (particularly with reference to Dr. Malin), the damage has already been done, and the status and impartially of such individuals as Dr. Malin have been suitably undermined.
This is perhaps the clearest indication of what might have been strongly differing viewpoints among the authors - one perhaps strongly in favour of the Cydonia artefacts being of intelligent origin, another not being so convinced and somewhat more open-minded.
The second thrust of the book is a discussion of planet-impacting comets and asteroids, and here the book hits more of an even stride - even if the authors prefer to limit their own thinking and merely report the thoughts, conjectures and concerns of others. Where the authors do inject their own thoughts on the matter, it is largely to whitter on about Cydonia and mystical geometry once more.
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Format: Paperback
It is wonderful for reasons I can't explain to read of our close relationship with a dead planet tens of millions of miles away. For instance, we learn early on in the book that Martian rock, having travelled that fabulous distance, bashes onto the surface of our planet at a rate of about 100 tons annually.
Hancock delivers the right information at a good pace and does not spoil the read with unnecessary eggheadspeak.
It is undeniably riveting to learn that vast pyramidal monuments on the surface of Mars, one estimated at 1/2 mile in height, are situated roughly in relation to the poles as are those similar, but considerably smaller in scale, at Giza. The mind will find it hard to rest after reading about this and many other jaw-dropping observations.
The computer-enchanced photographs are startling. The illustrative diagrams are easy to absorb.
It matters that the book is read widely. It will change fundamental notions for the reader about what is means to be human on this planet.
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Format: Paperback
This particular book starts off with a theory and then repeats it ad-infinitum. As with most of Hancocks theories, this book centres on the mathematical relationships between certain key objects. Unfortunately, as with all Hancock's theories, they all depend on a highly selective view of which objects to include. This does not stop Hancocks work being a thoroughly entertaining read. Just don't get too carried away with it.
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By A Customer on 13 July 1999
Format: Paperback
Yes, undoubtedly there are a few things in nature which makes one wonder. Did life actually existed in Mars before it was 'sterilised' by the astronomical catastrophe? Or else how would one explain the three dimensional 'face' in Cydonia?
Is it possible that the same civilisation which made that planetary beacon on Mars is responsible for the other mathematical oddities on Earth which cannot be explained by even present day science?
Or is there actually a 'Keeper' out there dropping hints to the last of the sentient beings in this Solar System before the ultimate wipeout happens....?
Or perhaps for the more cynical readers, correlations and coincidental occurrence of unnatural mathematical concepts like pi, phi, square roots of prime numbers are just a big joke from Mother Nature? (I don't think so)
Read and find out.
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By A Customer on 16 Oct. 1998
Format: Hardcover
This book grabs you from the moment you pick it up. It discusses Cydonia, the face and other features of the Martian surface. Using mathematical equations and theory, the authors give rational similarities between Mars and Earth. If life has ever existed on our red neighbour then this book, to me, has the most credible reasons for its extinction.
With plates dipicting actual, computer generated and illustrated pictures, even those starting out on researching the Mars mystery will find this a valuable addition to their studies
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