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For Maritsa, with Love Paperback – 1 Oct 2001

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 296 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's (1 Oct. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0689836368
  • ISBN-13: 978-0689836367
  • Package Dimensions: 21.4 x 13 x 1.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,136,965 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

A poignant story of a young homeless girl, living in the Paris Metro. Ambitious and challenging reading. -- Books Magazine, Christmas 2001

An unusual and powerful novel that explores the dark underside of Paris’ beautiful façade… a moving and engrossing work about vulnerability and hope -- The Bookseller

Highly atmospheric and engagingly readable. -- Irish Times

Part odyssey and part cautionary tale. -- Times Educational Supplement

Richemont’s novel ... does not shirk the issues of refugees and prejudice. It is a terrific page-turner. -- The Guardian

From the Publisher

The inspiration for FOR MARITSA, WITH LOVE came during the two years when Enid lived in Paris and encountered a Romanian gipsy girl, who was to become the complex, beguiling and utterly unforgettable Maritsa. Maritsa is a young gipsy girl, spending her days jumping on and off the Paris Metro, begging for a living. She knows how to melt rich commuters’ hearts without unduly disturbing their day. At first, she’s content, but then Maritsa catches a glimpse of a different world, just beyond her grasp. Or is it? A man and his pretty wife offer her a screen test for a movie. For Maritsa, it’s a dream come true. Fame is just around the corner, along with money and, best of all, beautiful clothes. But Maritsa’s dreams are about to take her into a dark and dangerous world. A world from which, once she enters, there may be no return. FOR MARITSA, WITH LOVE is one of the most haunting novels for teenagers you’ll read this year. Enid Richemont’s dazzling language and compelling characterisation perfectly evokes the heady world of lowlife Paris.

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This novel is about a gyspy child called Maritsa gets lead easily into the nasty underworld of paris. It is also about the courage of a teenager to put up with terrible conditions for example sleeping in stations, she has to beg for money and worst of all the abuse and predujice she has undergo each day for being a gypsy.
Maritsa herself has found that she has had to grpw up quickly and has never had the chance to be a child.
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I cannot praise this book highly enough. It is luminously written, by an author who knows Paris so well that the vividness and detail of her writing enable us to see the frost-sparkle on the pavements and smell the stale air of the Metro. The life and background of the illiterate Roma Gypsy girl, Maritsa, comes across as completely authentic. Maritsa is a multi-dimensional character who is bursting with life and her brave attempts to fend for herself by begging on the Metro are written with such sensitive insight that I had a lump in my throat and my eyes were brimming with tears. Well done, Enid. This book should have won prizes and it truly deserves to be back in the bookstores again.
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I saw this book recommended in an internet forum, and thought it sounded interesting. It is; I read it pretty much in an afternoon, sitting out in the sun. (Yes, really, it did shine one day!) It takes you into the underworld of Paris, and the main character, Maritsa, is a bubbly and enchanting guide. I've no way of knowing how true to that life it is, but it certainly rang true... the characters are all fully realised, and it doesn't stoop to stereotypes: the Roma aren't all good or bad, and neither are the police. Strongly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
The problems of this book are, paradoxically, its strengths: it doesn't flinch from describing the Parisian underworld of immigrants, buskers and worse, and its heroine is an unrepetant beggar. Maritsa is a Romany girl who lives by begging, carefully writing out her note of lies every day. She is good at what she does, but tired of her sprawling family she dreams of a life of freedom and money. This seems to be within reach thanks to a rather sinister man named Wilhelm. Maritsa hesitates though, as Richemont carefully describes the world she lives in: not just the Paris that tourists see, but the metro and the dark backstreets. A girl named Sylvie, who also lives on the streets, disappears and Maritsa is drawn deeper into the web.
The characters in this story are interesting and refreshing, and you will want to keep reading for the wonderful descriptive language. However, the storyline packs no punches.
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