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Many Rivers to Cross [DVD] [2008] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

4.3 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.
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Region 1 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the UK [Region 2]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
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£8.36 Only 6 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by RAREWAVES USA.

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Product details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: NR (Not Rated) (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00195I3OU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 81,904 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)
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Product description

film

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I liked a lot this very silly, EXTREMELY entertaining, merry and cheerful 1955 western comedy. Below, more of my impressions, with some very limited SPOILERS.

IMPORTANT PRECISION 1: this is a Region 1 NTSC DVD and it will NOT play on Region 2 European equipment. There is a Region 2 DVD available, released in France under the impossibly idiotic title (sadly, a frequent occurrence in French translations of American and British films) "L'aventure fantastique". This French release has also English language version and (at least according to amazon.co.uk page) even English subtitles.

IMPORTANT PRECISION 2: the title of this review is NOT a quote from the film - although it could be...)))

Somewhere just before year 1800, in Kentucky, a certain Bushrod Gentry (Robert Taylor), a real bear of a man, trapper by trade and eternal bachelor by conviction, meets a young, fierce maiden named Mary Stuart Cherne (Eleanor Parker). For reasons which cannot and will not be explained (after all, who can understand a woman?), Mary Stuart Cherne decides IMMEDIATELY that Bushrod Gentry will marry her and whatever may be his opinion on that matter - well, it doesn't matter! That is the beginning of the film and for the remaining 90 minutes Bushrod Gentry will learn IN THE HARDEST POSSIBLE WAY all the potential meanings of this old French saying: "Ce que femme veut, Dieu le veut..."...))) And I am not saying anything more about the story...

Although in principle this is a western, in fact this film is much more a "romantic comedy" quite exactly like those played in XVII and XVIII century theatres across Europe.
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Format: DVD
MGM presents "MANY RIVERS TO CROSS" (23 February 1955) (95 mins/Color) (Dolby digitally remastered) -- Our story line and plot, Bushrod Gentry (Robert Taylor) is the freelance fur trapper who is passing through --- On his way he is rescued by Mary Stuart Cherne (Eleanor Parker) --- Following this, the battle of the sexes begins --- It is frontier wits versus feminine charm, and guile --- Victor McLaughlin is himself (but that's just fine by me), James Arness plays a mountain man and a young Alan Hale Jr. (before Gilligan's Island) combine with the perennially juvenile antics of Russ Tamblyn to provide and hour and a half plus of escapist entertainment and downright good old fashioned laughter --- The final scene of Parker moaning over Taylor to attract the Indians to the scene and kill them, very funny and neatly done, easily worth the price of the ticket, or what must have been for those that saw it in the theater.

Under the production staff of:
Roy Rowland - Director
Jack Cummings - Producer
Harry Brown - Screenwriter
Steve Frazee - Screen Story
Guy Troper - Screenwriter
John F. Seitz - Cinematographer
Cyril Mockridge - Composer (Music Score) / Musical Direction/Supervision
Ben Lewis - Editor
Cedric Gibbons - Art Director
Hans Peters - Art Director
Walter Plunkett - Costume Designer

SPECIAL FEATURES:
BIOS:
1. Robert Taylor
Date of Birth: 5 August 1911 - Filley, Nebraska,
Date of Death: 8 June 1969 - Santa Monica, California

2. Eleanor Parker
Date of Birth: 26 June 1922 - Cedarville, Ohio
Date of Death: Still Living

the cast includes:
Robert Taylor ... Bushrod Gentry
Eleanor Parker ... Mary Stuart Cherne
Victor McLaglen ... Mr.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Robert Taylor and Eleanor Parker star in this entertaining and charming comedy set in the US Wild West. RT (looking like Mr Big in the HBO series) is a skilled trapper who is also devastatingly attractive in the eyes of the young women populating the towns and villages he visits. He literally has to fend them off but manages fine until he meets his match in strongwilled Eleanor Parker who becomes determined to marry him. It is far from intellectually taxing, in fact it is sometimes downright silly with lumbering males throwing punches and plucky women saying aw shucks. The stereotypical depictions of native Americans and women leave something to be desired for a modern viewer and you can hear the set pieces creaking as the actors tread through the "woods". But no matter, this is a thoroughly charming and entertaining film, perfect for a rainy Sunday. RT is surprisingly good at comedy, with the right amount of self-deprecation. Extra bonus for Eleanor P's father who turns out to be the bullying brother from the Quiet Man. All in all, highly recommended to viewers young of heart and with a mischiveous sense of humour.

this doesn't matte

Both leads are very good comedy actor
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Format: DVD
Saul Chaplin's infectiously enjoyable title song for backwoods comedy Western Many Rivers to Cross - The Berry Tree, sung by Sheb Wooley, Mr Wilhelm Scream himself - sets you up for rollicking good time that the film doesn't quite deliver, yet the film doesn't disappoint despite starring Robert Taylor, who was probably about as well known for his comic talents as Lionel Barrymore was for tap dancing. In the same vein as 7 Brides for 7 Brothers - it even co-stars two of the Brothers, Russ Tamblyn and Jeff Richards - but without the songs (well, apart from that title number) and a dozen fewer suitors, it matches frontiersman Taylor with settler Eleanor Parker, who's intent on matrimony and has him in her sights after saving his life from a Shawnee raiding party. Much of it is more gentle and laidback, with Taylor's Bushrod Gentry coming across as something of a dry run for Glenn Ford's resourceful and independent character in The Sheepman without having quite as clever and subversive a script, yet there are more than enough laughs - especially in the two cave scenes - to keep things fun and friendly. And that song will be stuck in your head for weeks after.

Warner's US NTSC DVD has a fine widescreen transfer in the original 2.55:1 ratio with the original trailer as extra.
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