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Man's Search For Meaning: The classic tribute to hope from the Holocaust by [Frankl, Viktor E]
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Man's Search For Meaning: The classic tribute to hope from the Holocaust Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 597 customer reviews

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Length: 161 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl is among the most influential works of psychiatric literature since Freud. The book begins with a lengthy, austere and deeply moving personal essay about Frankl's imprisonment in Auschwitz and other concentration camps for five years and his struggle during this time to find reasons to live. The second part of the book, called "Logotherapy in a Nutshell" describes the psychotherapeutic method that Frankl pioneered as a result of his experiences in the concentration camps. Freud believed that sexual instincts and urges were the driving force of humanity's life; Frankl, by contrast, believes that man's deepest desire is to search for meaning and purpose. Therefore, Frankl's logotherapy is much more compatible with western religions than Freudian psychotherapy. This is a fascinating, sophisticated and very human book. At times, Frankl's personal and professional discourses merge into a style of tremendous power. "Our generation is realistic, for we have come to know man as he really is", Frankl writes. "After all, man is that being who invented the gas chambers of Auschwitz; however, he is also that being who entered those gas chambers upright, with the Lord's Prayer or the Shema Yisrael on his lips." --Christine Buttery

Review

"Remarkable...It changed my life and became a part of all that I live and all that I teach." (Susan Jeffers, author of Feel The Fear And Do It Anyway and Embracing Uncertainty)

"A poignant testimony...a hymn to the phoenix rising in each of us who choose life before flight." (Brian Keenan, author of An Evil Cradling)

"His works are essential reading for those who seek to understand the human condition." (Chief Rabbi Dr Jonathan Sacks)

"An enduring work of survival literature." (New York Times)

"If you read but one book this year, Dr Frankl's book should be that one." (Los Angeles Times)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 526 KB
  • Print Length: 161 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Digital; New Ed edition (9 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00EKOC0HI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 597 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,730 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Victor showed an exceptional insights on how a human can survive extreme conditions by having meaning for his life which empower human being to keep up...
As the author wrote:"Forces beyond your control can take away everything you possess except one thing, your freedom to choose how you will respond to the situation."

The author concluded that the great task for any person is to find meaning in his or her life by one of following ways:
- Creating a work or doing a deed;
- Experiencing something or encountering someone; or
- The attitude we take toward unavoidable suffering.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the first part of the book, Frankl describes his personal experiences as a prisoner in the Nazi concentration camps. He traces the mental state of an average prisoner in the camps, beginning upon arrival, and through liberation. Frankl writes of the prisoner’s journey from irrational hope, to “relative apathy” as they watch loved ones in the dreaded selection, arriving finally at a complete inability to grasp the meaning of freedom. The dispassionate writing makes the horrors of the camp extremely distressing, more so than writing that is more emotionally involved. It is almost reportage.

Throughout this development, there still remains the question: what were the thoughts that gave a prisoner the drive to live?

"We who lived in the concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms--to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way

Having a purpose in life, writes Frankl, is the key to withstanding almost any suffering. Frankl named his theory "logotherapy", since logos is Greek for meaning. A method employed in psychology, "logotherapy" causes a patient to pinpoint and become familiar with the meaning of his life, which according to Frankl is the patient's will to strive, succeed, and to live. Frankl argues we cannot avoid suffering, but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I reread Man's Search for Meaning every time I need to be reminded of the preciousness of life. Or the futility in fighting the circumstances one should find one's self in. This is a book that everyone should read at least once. It's significance to our lives cannot be understated.

Living in Vienna, I am even more drawn in by the experience of Dr Frankl. I have only oberseved a richer description of the maltreatment of Jews pre transportation to the camps in Freud's Fantasy. A book which describes Freud's resistances to leave Vienna and his believe that gestapo terror will not continue. 2/3 jews in Europe were killed from 1939 to 1945. A tragedy that man's search for meaning has found some semblance of use in. For the description of how to survive such horrors remind us: we all control our thoughts. And actually that's all we can control in many instances.

Before you give up. Think how you can Change your thoughts to create joy and wellbeing. And think of Dr Frankl, who could only choose survival thoughts and survived on them.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Viktor Frankl writes in such a candid way about his experiences of being in concentration camps during the Holocaust. The particular significance of this book is in respect of this observations on the human condition during the most horrendous of circumstances. He introduces us to the notion that finding meaning can be found in any place. Folliwing his experience of being in the camps he then returned to his profession of being a psychoanalyst and psychiatrist and he developed logotherapy which focues on helping people to find the purpose and meaning of their own
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Finally I read it. I'd heard Robbins bang on about it, and other gurus, but thought it wasn't for me. I thought it would be down and miserable. It's not. In fact, it's more uplifting than the aforementioned Mr Robbins himself, and I can see where he got some of his ideas from.

Unlike counselling, or preaching, or life coaching, this book lets you come to your own conclusions about life, and getting somewhere in it. Hard to explain here, but the first 100 pages of this book (the main section), come from a uniquely personal time in history, which strangely speaks to the universal. As in, you and me.

Don't say, "yeah, maybe I'll read it one day". Buy it today. You will be happier for it, guaranteed.
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Really - every one should read this book. Frankl avoids moralising and never tries to garner sympathy for himself or for Jews. Instead he just lays out the lived reality of the tragedy and what how it led him to a new approach to psychotherapy that - rather uniquely - does not require figuring out the original cause of a person's upset.

It won't take you long to read - it's quite thin. Just go do it.
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