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The Manifesto on How to be Interesting Paperback – 1 Aug 2014

4.6 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Usborne Publishing Ltd (1 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1409562182
  • ISBN-13: 978-1409562184
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,462 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Probably the best YA novel I've ever read, and that's a strong statement to make. --Emma Blackery

Full of wisdom, heartache, and honesty, this tops John Green in my book. --Never Judge a Book by its Cover

I'd recommend this book to anyone and everyone. --Beth Reekles, YA author (The Kissing Booth)

The banter & bitchiness is UTTERLY ADDICTIVE. --Non Pratt, YA author (Trouble)

Tackles issues like peer pressure, bullying and self-harm, but so very readable. --Bookseller Children's Buyers Guide

Very much in tune with her audience, this second novel from Holly has characters that readers will relate to and remember long after reading the last page. --Lovereading4kids

Holly Bourne has written an intriguing and well-written YA novel that keeps you turning the pages and is a meaner Mean Girls of sorts. --Booktrust

This is a book which is hard to put down and will find a large audience with readers both older and younger than the suggested age group. --School Library Journal

One of the most honest voices I've ever read in YA contemporary fiction. --Books for YA

My favourite book this year. --Boxes of Foxes

Intelligent but introverted Bree might not seem at first to be an every girl but her fears, her emotions, her vulnerability... will strike a chord with both teens and their parents. Bourne is a prodigiously talented author who has the gift of making fiction seem real. --Lancashire Evening Post

As you'd expect this book is witty and clever. I quickly connected with Bree and was chuckling away after a few pages... I loved that this wasn't a purely happy or sad book but a messy realistic in between much like life really. --Jess Hearts Books

A great book...It made me grateful that I never in my life have to go back to school ever again! --A Book and Tea

Hard to put down. --School Librarian

I clung to my kindle and read as fast as I possibly could... The ending was explosive and when there was ten percent left, I really didn't know how the plot would end. --Emma Lou Book Blog

About the Author

Holly Bourne graduated with a first class degree in Journalism Studies and spent two years working as a local news reporter on the Surrey Mirror, garnering a nomination for Print Journalist of the Year in 2010. She now works as a journalist for TheSite.org, an advice and information website for 16-25 year olds.


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
First of all, this is a very attractive book that straight away catches your eye with the red page edges. The blurb is on the front as the rules that the main character, Bree, concocts are listed.
Bree is a geek girl. She has been bullied and isn't one of the "popular possie" - every teenaged girl will recognise this. She has a friend, Holdo, who has named himself after Holden Caulfield in Catcher in the Rye. She has a good time being friends but doesn't fancy him. She does fancy her English teacher, Mr Fellows, and flirts with him. They are attracted to each other by their mutual interest in creative writing. I found this bit of the book very uncomfortable to read. I was relieved when Holly Bourne pointed out through Mr Fellows that he "could go to prison" for what he does with Bree. Bree also tries to get in with the girls in the popular possie, and this results in some funny episodes which really ring true.
Bree is a self harmer and unfortunately her relationship with Mr Fellows plays its part in taking her to the edge of a total breakdown. It's a gripping read and you can see how Holly Bourne has used her experience as an agony aunt to really understand what makes teenage girls tick. The book faithfully represents what life is like today if you are 17 years old and trying to get along with your life.
It's worth pointing out that the book carries a warning "Not suitable for younger readers" as there are some strong sexual references in it.
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The first book I read of Holly's was Am I Normal Yet?, I related to that so much it was like reading about my life because I am Evie. And now again I have to say I can realate to this because I am a little like Bree. The thing I liked with this book is that Bree is a 'normal' person amongst rich people, she didn't care what she looked like, what she said, what she did she was her own person with her tights! Being 17 myself I am quite intimidated by the 'popular' girls in the world because of how they look, how they act, how they dress...and after reading this book I know now that I don't need to be. Because actually they are just as insecure as everyone else and make mistakes just like everyone else, they are far from perfect as Bree said. This book also makes teengaers very aware of the dangers of wanting to sleep with a guy just because he's cute or he's the 'popular' boy in the whole school, it does have self-harm in it but I actually like that because Holly is such an open and honest author that people should learn off her. Mental health needs to be more recognized rather than just calling someone 'crazy'. Such a clever idea for a book this is one of my favourites same with Am I Normal Yet?, I can't wait to start reading How Hard Can Love Be? the second book in the Normal series. I recommend Holly to anyone she has a special way of writing, she is so open, honest and raw its amazing. I wish to meet her one day because Am I Normal Yet and this book changed my life because there are people out there who understand OCD, anxiety, depression and self harm and Holly writes it from an honest point of view, she writes it as if your going through it yourself with the characters and I love that! 10/10 for me!
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Review originally posted on A Frolic Through Fiction (book blog): [...]

I’m just going to go ahead and say it: I should have read this book first.

Out of all of Holly Bourne’s books that I’ve read so far, I should’ve started with this one. Purely because when I read Am I Normal Yet? and How Hard Can Love Be? I absolutely adored them, so my expectations for this one were high, to say the least. Everything that was said in those books I agreed with…and I feel like the exact opposite happened with this one, so that was a shock to the system.

But more on that later.

I did enjoy this book. I’m pretty sure by now that Holly Bourne has a theme of mentioning important topics in her books. Well, this one’s no different. While the main theme is popularity, self harm, friendship, family and many teenage issues are mentioned throughout. The amount of things covered actually impressed me. And they were all done quite well – even if they were only mentioned rather than being explored in more depth, just that acknowledgment that these issues exist was enough for me to add a tick.

With this book being set in a school, the teen culture was obviously really strong. The way people act, the groups that form in school, the workload – everything seemed exactly the same as when I was in school myself. Which again, impressed me, because every time I’ve read a book set in a school so far it’s been a bit cheesy and full of stereotypes. But in this case, it felt real and I could relate to the experiences there.

I really liked one specific thing this book explained about writing. I’m not a writer myself, but still this one thing really stood out to me. Our main character Bree is a wannabe writer, and so obviously she tries. That’s how the story kicks off.
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Format: Paperback
Last year I was lucky enough to read Holly Bourne’s debut novel Soulmates before publication. It was one of my favourite books of 2013 and I hugely anticipated Holly’s second book which is of course The Manifesto on How to Be Interesting.

Manifesto is a little different from Soulmates in that it’s completely contemporary but one huge similarity is how honest it is. Once again Holly offers us characters who read like real teenagers who are going through relatable situations. It never feels like a fiction story with a typical beginning, middle and inevitable happy ending but more like we are getting a glimpse into a real person’s life and that’s what has quickly made Holly Bourne one of my favourite authors.

The book is about Bree a self-confessed loser who enjoys watching obscure movies with her best friend Holdo and dreams of one day getting one of her many novels published. After one too many rejection letters from agents and publishers and some advice from her English teacher, Bree decides that she needs to be someone who you would want to read about. Bree doesn’t want to be popular but she does want to be interesting and so her blog ‘The Manifesto on How to Be Interesting’ is born as she chronicles her journey into getting a life to use as “research” for her next WIP.

As you’d expect this book is witty and clever. I quickly connected with Bree and was chuckling away after a few pages. What I didn’t expect from Manifesto was it to be so moving. Bree is really insecure in who she is and although she’s a damn good writer she doubts herself and her dreams. Bree reads like a real teenager so although there are plenty of hilarious moments here there are also some serious themes covered too such as self-harm and bullying.
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