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Managing with Dual Strategies: Mastering the Present - Preempting the Future Hardcover – 27 Aug 1993

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: The Free Press (27 Aug. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0029001455
  • ISBN-13: 978-0029001455
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.8 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,024,488 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Brad Gale co-author of "The PIMS Principles: Linking Strategy to Performance" Connecting with customers today and preempting the markets of the future are truly the dual challenges that operating executives face. In "Managing with Dual Strategies," Derek Abell provides a refreshing new perspective for simultaneously achieving current performance and driving change that will capture the future.

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Format: Hardcover
Derek Abell is an internationally recognized professor at the Swiss IMD business school. He has shown THOUGHT LEADERSHIP on strategy in books like Defining the Business (1980) and Strategic Market Planning (1979).
This book summarizes Abell's complete experience on strategic planning. And I promise you; he has a lot to offer!
This fall of 2004, a leading Danish business school still used this book as curricula for their MBA-level course on business development. I have many newer strategy books on my bookshelf, but I agree fully with their choice.
Abell's core idea is that TO SUSTAIN EXCELLENCE, COMPANIES NEED DUAL STRATEGIES - ONE FOR THE PRESENT AND ONE FOR THE FUTURE.
The distinction between a PRESENT ("today for today") and FUTURE ("today for tomorrow") orientation is not the usual short-term, long-term distinction - in which the short-term plan is simply a detailed operations and budgeting exercise made in the context of a hoped-for long-term market position. Present planning also requires strategy - a vision of how the firm has to operate now (given its competencies and target markets) and what the role of each key function will be. The long-term plan, by contrast, is built on a vision of the future - even more important, on a strategy for getting there.
Planning for today requires a clear, precise definition of the business - a delineation of target customer segments, customer functions, and the business approach to be taken; planning for tomorrow is concerned with how the business should be redefined for the future.
Planning for today focuses on shaping up the business to meet the needs of today's customers with excellence.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dual planning: Strategy-for-Today and Strategy-for-Tomorrow 26 Nov. 2004
By Peter Leerskov - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Derek Abell is an internationally recognized professor at the Swiss IMD business school. He has shown THOUGHT LEADERSHIP on strategy in books like Defining the Business (1980) and Strategic Market Planning (1979).

This book summarizes Abell's complete experience on strategic planning. And I promise you; he has a lot to offer!

This fall of 2004, a leading Danish business school still used this book as curricula for their MBA-level course on business development. I have many newer strategy books on my bookshelf, but I agree fully with their choice.

Abell's core idea is that TO SUSTAIN EXCELLENCE, COMPANIES NEED DUAL STRATEGIES - ONE FOR THE PRESENT AND ONE FOR THE FUTURE.

The distinction between a PRESENT ("today for today") and FUTURE ("today for tomorrow") orientation is not the usual short-term, long-term distinction - in which the short-term plan is simply a detailed operations and budgeting exercise made in the context of a hoped-for long-term market position. Present planning also requires strategy - a vision of how the firm has to operate now (given its competencies and target markets) and what the role of each key function will be. The long-term plan, by contrast, is built on a vision of the future - even more important, on a strategy for getting there.

Planning for today requires a clear, precise definition of the business - a delineation of target customer segments, customer functions, and the business approach to be taken; planning for tomorrow is concerned with how the business should be redefined for the future.

Planning for today focuses on shaping up the business to meet the needs of today's customers with excellence. It involves identifying factors that are critical to success and smothering them with attention; planning for tomorrow can entail reshaping the business to compete more effectively in the future.

Planning for today seeks to achieve compliance in the firm's functional activities with whatever definition of the business has been chosen; planning for tomorrow often involves bold moves away from existing ways of conducting the business.

Planning for today requires an organization that mirrors current business opportunities; planning for tomorrow may require reorganization for future challenges.

IN SHORT, PLANNING FOR TODAY IS ABOUT MANAGING CURRENT ACTIVITIES WITH EXCELLENCE; PLANNING FOR TOMORROW IS ABOUT MANAGING CHANGE.

I've read this book three times since it was published (okay, I may be somewhat slow). And each time, I add to my knowledge on working with strategy. Having worked very much with strategic management in practice over the last 15 years, I find it amazing that I cannot make more people read this book. But I won't give up. If you don't have time to read the full book, then consider reading Abell's article on the same subject in Sloan Management Review, spring 1999. However, the article doesn't include much on Abell's heavy toolbox presented in the book.

Peter Leerskov,
MSc in International Business (Marketing & Management) and Graduate Diploma in E-business
4.0 out of 5 stars Two complementary strategies needed: "Planning for Today" and "Planning for Tomorrow" 6 Jan. 2015
By Daniel Huber - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very interesting Bokk on classical stategy building, but with an innovative and very important twist: There are TWO strategies do be developed, one for today's business and one for tomorrow's business (i.e. the new yet to be developed business). The development of the two follow different and sometimes contraditionary rules. That's what makes it difficult for the companies. This is NOT the classical short-term vs. long-term view, because both stategies have short-term aspects as well as long-term aspects. The essential point is: What needs to be done today (followed-up in the future) to keep today's business healthy (Planning for Today), and on the other hand what needs to be done today (followed-up in the future) to generate new businesses für tomorrow (i.e. when today's business will be outdated) (Planning for Tomorrow). Such dual strategies are essential for the long-term stability of enterprises but unfortunately are seldom applied. "Planning vor Tomorrow" the is the basic form of the innovation strategy of the enterprise.
3.0 out of 5 stars Management was not that different 25 years ago. 9 Aug. 2016
By Jackal - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
This is an interesting book for readers interested in the history of strategic management. It was written just before the Internet became a commercial factor to deal with. Still, most of the content in the book is valid today. In many cases, the old perspective can provide new insights even to managers today. The author talks about the trends towards manufacturers controlling retail (e.g luxury goods) and rising aspirations leading to growth in the high end of markets (cars, college). Insightful written in 1993. Of course, some things are missing (eg multisided markets) and others are only embryonic (eg disruptive technologies).

The reason that I am only giving the book three starts is the small target audience, 23 years after the book was published.
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