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Man Who [VINYL] Limited Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 173 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl (24 May 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Limited Edition
  • Label: Independiente
  • ASIN: B00004WXD6
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Mini-Disc  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (173 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,516,362 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Having never heard of Travis, I bought the album on the back of the single 'Why Does It Always Rain On Me?', but I was still unsure. Having listened to it once I was captivated, after the second time, I was spellbound. Being a massive hard rock fan, it may surprise you that Travis' mellow tunes are possibly the best thing that I have heard for quite some time: its THAT good. Every song on the album is a potential release, and it appears that Fran and the rest of the group have put some thought into the album unlike some groups I have listened to. Don't cast the chance to buy it aside on the grounds that you only like 'Rap' or 'Heavy Metal'. Thanks to the sublime 'Driftwood', the passionate 'Last Laugh' and the thought-provoking 'Turn', this is an album of all tastes. Buy it, go on......
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Format: Audio CD
I just don't get it. How otherwise articulate and intelligent persons, obviously possessing great musical taste (or they would not have been persuaded to buy the album in the first place), can find only one ill-fitting word to describe this album.
Depressing? The album as a whole? I cannot think of a less fitting summation. Why is it that suddenly any song that is less than a headlong rush to the final bar is now depressing? Rather, the slower songs on this album are in turns wistful, autumnal, regretful, and accepting -- but, lest this dissuade potential buyers, let me say that this is only in contrast to the interspersed up tempo tracks.
We begin with Writing To Reach You, considered by some to be the strongest track. It certainly has a lot to offer, and may have contributed to the expectations of some who expect all tracks on an album to follow a pattern set by the first track.
Continue with The Fear, probably the best track in terms of lyrics (though some would contest that assertion with either Slide Show or Blue Flashing Light (of which more anon)). It may the least romantic love song I have ever heard.
Next comes As You Are, a song which for much of its length deserves the appelation 'filler.' But then it kicks into life, and redeems itself. Still strong lyrically (as all the songs are).
Then most people's favourite, Driftwood. We have gone from high-ish tempo, to medium, to medium-quick, to upbeat, and the contrast makes Driftwood stand out even more. Superb song.
Now my favourite, The Last Laugh of the Laughter. Far too rarely do we hear piano on indie tracks, and this use of it is so subtly mixed with the guitar that it's hard to tell where one ends and the other begins.
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Format: Audio CD
The release of '12 Memories' triggered off a great realisation in my head. 'Oh yeah! Travis! Whatever happened to those guys?' I'll tell you what happened, a band by the name of Coldplay adopted the way that Travis balanced their varying audiences, and used no lack of charm to recieve world-wide aclaim. Yes Chris Martin and Co. are lovely chaps who have two great albums behind them. But Travis ae better. Make no mistake. 'The Man Who' is seemingly the best evidence of this, ten songs written and sung beautifully by frontman Fran Healy. At the time of release it was what the pop industry was crying out for, bridging the gap between pop surbanity like the Stereophonics and the inaccesibilty of Radiohead. A wonderful effort and a great array of melancholy yet inspiring tunes (Starsailor take note). But has anyone else completely had it up to here with 'Why Does it Always Rain on Me'?
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Format: Audio CD
It seems that these songs were written especially for me. I can relate to them extremely well. They combine fantastic, truthful, deep lyrics with catchy tunes that I caught myself humming when I wasn't even thinking about it. It isn't often that I buy CDs which have nothing but brilliant songs on it, and this is one of them. I can't decide which is my favourite, but it is either Writing To Reach You or Turn. There is also a 'secret song' at the end of the album, which is worth buying the entire CD for.
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Format: Audio CD
Beautiful. The most peaceful and therapeutic record you will ever hear. Each track is filled with the gentle strumming of acoustic sensations combined with the harmonious words of Fran Healy, calm and flowing from one song to the next. The whole record is like early morning springtime at sea. The soft chords of the water ripple underneath the tinkle of raindrops in 'The Last Laugh Of The laughter' and the boat rocks rhythmically through the majestic 'Slide Show,' which has its references to Beck, The Manic Street Preachers and old time rock 'n roll pals Oasis, the latter of which have contributed the concept of "wonderwall" twice in this collection of epical ballads.
The album sets off from the docks with the ever familiar 'Writing to Reach You' and is arguably the best song Travis have released since the anthemic 'All I Wanna Do Is Rock' from the highly commendable 'Good Feeling.' By the time 'The Fear' arrives, the sails are flapping and the boat is well on its way.
Half the beauty of the record is the lyrics, as personal and heartfelt as the music. Fran's sincerity brings a sense of poetic justice to his words. Despite the balladic mood of the album, there is only one apparent love song entitled 'Luv,' ironically, which contains the sweet caresses of a slurring harmonica and echoed shakes of the tambourine whilst Healy quietly enquires; "What's so wrong?/Why the face so long?/Is it over?"
'The Man Who' is a floating ride in peace and tranquillity and drifts slowly down the river like a feather on the wind, affectionately rocking its way back to the harbour on a sea of acoustic guitars and a breeze of lyrical genius. Travis at their finest.
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