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The Man Who Loved Women [DVD]

4.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Charles Denner, Brigitte Fossey, Nelly Borgeaud, Leslie Caron, Genevieve Fontanel
  • Directors: Francois Truffaut
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Twentieth Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: 4 Aug. 2003
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00009XW8B
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,181 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Romantic comedy directed by Francois Truffaut. Bertrand Morane (Charles Denner) is a charming ladies' man, who loves every woman he meets. However, when he decides to reveal all in his autobiography, he encounters the beautiful and elusive Genevieve (Brigitte Fossey). Could he really be falling in love at last?

From Amazon.co.uk

A deceptively simple film, Francois Truffaut's The Man Who Loved Women is neither an indictment nor an apology for philandering; rather, it's a courageous, lovingly detailed portrait of a complex, intelligent man suffering from an altogether intractable complaint. Scientist Bertrand Morane, "never in the company of men after 5", seduces women by evening and writes about the experiences in the early morning. Though 40-ish and somewhat square, no woman in the town of Montpelier seems capable of resisting his earnest advances.

Not much else happens in them film, but in the hands of master visual storyteller Truffaut, the threadbare plot accumulates deep and ominous philosophical resonances. What drives Morane from woman to woman, and what accounts for his remarkable success? Does he secretly dislike women and consider them interchangeable (as one of the more prurient characters charges, to Morane's genuine befuddlement), or is his enthusiasm a kind of celebration? Truffaut refuses to answer plainly, but does drop clues; as his camera focuses on everyday objects, many take on a chilling, otherworldly lustre, and coldly foreshadow Morane's fate. This film was clumsily remade in English in 1983 by Blake Edwards, with Burt Reynolds assuming the role played here with such understated skill by the wonderful Charles Denner. --Miles Bethany

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This film could only have been made by the French, and then only in the 1970's. It would be easy to dismiss it at first glance as a chauvinist celebration of political incorrectness; indeed, when the Americans tried to remake it in 1983 by casting Burt Reynolds in the Charles Denner role, that is exactly what it became.
However, here the story is in the hands of a master. Truffaut's deft directorial touch poses myriad questions about the nature of the relationship between men and women; about love, commitment; physical attraction and sexual politics. The film begins with the funeral of Betrand Morane (Denner), attended only by women and then tells the story of his relationships with most of them. Interestingly, he really does love the women - he can't seem to help loving them. He is not a philanderer, nor is he interested in conquest or sexual gratification: the film is, in fact, strangely asexual.
He decides to write about his experiences, the book is dismissed by the male reviewers but his manuscript is accepted by the sole female with whom Morane inevitably falls in love. As the story moves forward and, in doing so, flashes back, one grows to like Morane more and more; he is a sweet, bewildered character who is also a man loved by women. This film will not be for all: if you are the Hollywood blockbuster type; if you hate subtitles; if you like your films with nice, neat endings then this is not for you. However, for lovers of the European school of whimsy, this is a must; not Truffaut's best - but even his second best is better than most.
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This film is wonderful... Nestor Almendros' work is sensational, seamless and the long-honed result of ten years hard graft in the New Wave (much of it with Truffaut). The moving camera is a joy and check out the static shots, too! Nathalie Baye is gorgeous, as well... The unrelenting honesty of the protagonist's revealed confesssion grips from the first few minutes. This is brave, fluent film-making that manages to be at once restrained (neo-Classical, even) but also supremely capricious and intimate. That is Truffaut's signature, of course... Really, really enjoyed seeing this again in this transfer. Highly recommended for fans of French and, indeed, any cinema that prizes candour.
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Format: DVD
Truffaut's The Man Who Loved Women could be viewed as an oblique homage to Casanova's often misinterpreted memoirs. Bertrand (Denner) is obsessed with women but not in the sense of a misogynistic chronicler of conquests. This man, like Casanova, is at the mercy of love or rather the concept of love - someone who is irresistibly drawn to the beauty of the female form (posture, fashion, speech, mannerisms etc) and the unending attraction of the company of women (he does not socialise with men). Betrand's primary motivation is the continuous seduction of women from any class, nationality or occupation. He does not revel in the transgression of society's moral absolutes and cannot conform to the contract-based monogamy of conventional gender relationships. Consequently the film centres on Bertrand's women, his relationship with his mother and his desire to document his `life history' in the form of a philosophical novel. Within this narrative framework the film exudes humour, warmth and exceptional wit. I found myself laughing out loud on many occasions: Delphine, the young Bertrand, the lingerie shop, the baby sitter etc etc. Interestingly Truffaut appears at the beginning of the film and is seen donning his cap as Bertrand glides by!!!
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I saw this film years and years ago,and it always stuck in my mind as being a good film.Although I don't speak french fluently it doesn't matter as the film is simple to understand.Buy it watch it and appreciate what a good film can be like.
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I saw this film at Birmingham Arts Centre when i was 19 or 20 and don't remember much about it, other than feeling envious about all these lovely French women he was loving. And how they all seemed to fall easily into his lap, loving him up too. Why can't i have his irresistible seductive charm (i was probably wondered at the time)

Watching now i can see its still a charming and sweet film. Charles Denner is sweet and charming, almost like a little boy lost (well, he was neglected if not abandoned by his slutty mother) He seems so innocent in his pursuit, so earnest about his captures.

The jammy b. The man loved by women more like. Cus they all say Yes.

"Its hard to refuse you anything. You have a special way of asking. Its as if your life depended on it" says one smitten women. And its true - he does. He's not just putting it on to get them in the sack. Well, he is. But at the time he must believe it. The woman in front - before his captivating gaze - is captivated, is the be all and the end all. Of this moment, of this very moment of capture, of conquest - she is It.

He captures these women like a painter or a poet would: with devotion to the visual image, with utter fidelity to the language of love: "the way she moved...she undulated like seaweed"; he distinguishes "between the tall stems and the pretty blossoms"

He's leched or loved after (take your pick) just about every woman he comes a across. What he seems to like is not women, the whole woman - just their legs with stockings on and stilettos. Or perhaps a specific aspect or attribute. Cus every woman has some particular thing about them that can be loved. Some bit, some part, some posture or pose. You divide that bit off - and discard the rest.
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