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Man Who Lied to His Laptop, The : What We Can Learn About Ourselves from Our Machines Paperback – 2 Aug 2012

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: CURRENT (2 Aug. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1617230049
  • ISBN-13: 978-1617230042
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.8 x 21.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 935,468 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"If Dale Carnegie had been a Google engineer, this is how he would have written "How to Win Friends and Influence People." Cliff Nass shows us how much we can learn about people by understanding how people interact with computers."
-Chip Heath, coauthor of "Switch" and "Made to Stick"
"With the help of real experiments, rather than anecdotes or impressions, Clifford Nass uses people's interactions with computers as a window into social and professional life. The book is filled with insights about an increasingly important part of our lives."
-Steven Pinker, Harvard College Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of "How the Mind Works" and "The Stuff of Thought"
"With engaging illustrations and compelling evidence, Clifford Nass shows how interactions with our most advanced machines reveal our most primitive workings."
-Robert B. Cialdini, author of "Influence: Science and Practice"
"Nass and Yen serve up a wealth of practical, h

About the Author

Clifford Nass is the Thomas M. Storke Professor at Stanford University and director of the Communication between Humans and Interactive Media (CHIMe) Lab. He is a popular designer, consultant, and keynote speaker, and is widely quoted by the media on issues such as the impact of multitasking on young minds. He lives in Silicon Valley.

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Format: Hardcover
It's been said so many times that it's by now become a staid cliché: humans are social animals. We are adapted to social interaction, and to a large extend depend on our ability to interact and cooperate with others. Considering how important our social interactions are for our survival, it is surprising how little room it's allocated in the regular school curriculum to learning more about what science has to teach us on this topic. Social Psychology, the branch of Psychology that deals with this subject, is in my opinion the most important of all social sciences, and perhaps the most practically relevant branch of science overall when it comes to usefulness for our daily lives. "The Man Who Lied to His Computer" is an excellent primer of that field, and overall a surprisingly useful and relevant popular science book.

The title of this book seems to evoke Oliver Sacks' writings, and "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" in particular. Sacks, a well-known British neurologist and writer, has dedicated his life to exploring the hidden secrets of the way that our minds work by examining peculiar pathologies of the brain. Nass and Yen, on the other hand, have written a book based on the series of experiments performed at the Nass' Stanford laboratory. These experiments tried to elucidate the way we interact with each other by looking at our interactions with computers. After spending many years on improving computer interfaces and the humanizing our interaction with computers, Nass had stumbled onto a brilliant idea of reversing the direction of his research, and started looking into improving the ways that we interact with each other based on the ways that we treat computers.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A great read for anyone interested in how people treat computers and other electronic objects as "real" people. The book is full of interesting research studies conducted by Nass and his colleagues, and is a fact-packed yet very pleasant read.
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