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The Man With The Golden Gun [DVD]

4.2 out of 5 stars 131 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Roger Moore, Christopher Lee, Britt Ekland, Maud Adams, Hervé Villechaize
  • Directors: Guy Hamilton
  • Writers: Ian Fleming, Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz
  • Producers: Albert R. Broccoli, Charles Orme, Harry Saltzman
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: MGM
  • DVD Release Date: 3 Nov. 2003
  • Run Time: 119 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (131 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004SH4T
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 15,646 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

DVD Special Features :

Audio Commentary featuring Director Guy Hamilton, the Cast and Crew
"Inside The Man with the Golden Gun" Documentary
"Double-O-Stuntmen" Documentary: a look at the greatest stunts and stunt
Performers in the Bond films
Stills Gallery
Original TV Ads
Radio Spots
Collectable "Making Of" Booklet
Trailers
English Subtitles
1.77:1 widescreen 16:9 version
Dolby Digital

From Amazon.co.uk

The British spy with a licence to kill takes on his dark underworld double, a classy assassin who kills with golden bullets at £1 million a hit. Roger Moore, in his second outing as James Bond, meets Christopher Lee's Scaramanga, one of the most magnetic villains in the entire series, in this entertaining but rather wan entry in the 007 sweepstakes. Bond's globetrotting search takes him to Hong Kong, Bangkok, and finally China, where Scaramanga turns his island retreat into a twisted theme park for a deadly game of wits between the gunmen, moderated by Scaramanga's diminutive man Friday Nick Nack (Fantasy Island's Hervé Villechaize). Britt Ekland does her best as an embarrassingly inept Bond girl, a clumsy, dim agent named Mary Goodnight who looks fetching in a bikini, while Maud Adams is Scaramanga's tough but haunted lover and assistant. Clifton James, the redneck sheriff from Live and Let Die, makes an ill-advised appearance as a racist tourist. He briefly teams up with 007 in what is otherwise the film's highlight, a high-energy chase through the crowded streets of Bangkok that climaxes with a breathtaking mid-air corkscrew jump. Bond and company are let down by a lazy script, but Moore balances the overplayed humour with a steely performance and Lee's charm and enthusiasm makes Scaramanga a cool, deadly, and thoroughly enchanting adversary. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The Man With the Golden Gun was producer Harry Saltzman's last hurrah before selling out his share in the Bond series to United Artists to ensure the maximum inconvenience to his detested partner Cubby Broccoli. It's certainly not premium Bond: at times it threatens to turn into an episode of The Avengers, what with Scaramanga's funhouse, his midget servant Nick Nack, its human statues or the off-kilter angles of MI6's Hong Kong HQ located in the rusting wreck of the Queen Elizabeth, not to mention Roger Moore's more Steed-like Bond. Although there are hints of the lows to come in Moore's tenure - Bond being saved by a pair of schoolgirls or defeating a villain by pretending to be a tailor's dummy - this is still recognisable an old-school Bond film, with thankfully few gadgets, although it's disappointing that the producers provide Scaramanga with an island lair and super-weapon to give Bond something to blow up at the end (a rather half-hearted effort to be sure: instead of a private army, Scaramanga simply has Herve Villachaize and a maintenance man). Britt Ekland's irritating `typical silly woman' comic relief was a bit hard to take in 1974 and gets worse with each passing year, but Christopher Lee's Scaramanga is one of the more interesting Bond villains, not least because of his imagined empathy with his prey - he regards himself as Bond's moral and professional equal, the kind of pathological snobbery Fleming's books were full of but the films increasingly abandoned.Read more ›
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I'll start by making one thing clear: this definitely still isn't the best Bond film, but after all the negative things I've read about it from critics and Bond fans alike, I was quite surprised at how great I thought it was when I finally watched it.

The first thing about this film that sets it apart from most of the others, or to begin with at least, is how unconventional the plot is for a Bond film; after the usual pre-credits sequence, the story begins with 007 being called into M's office with a warning that he has been targeted by the notorious assassin, the titular 'Man with the Golden Gun', aka Francisco Scaramanga. Realising that the only thing that can give him the advantage over such a renowned killer is to "find him first", Bond sets out to track down the assassin before said assassin can get the drop on him.

Many of the scenarios in this film are some of the most hilariously over-the-top of the lot, such as a fight scene in a karate school and a car chase culminating in the villain's vehicle donning wings and flying off into the horizon, but this is one of few Bond films where the story actually had me gripped. This is largely due to Christopher Lee's performance as Scaramanga, who comes across as a sort of 'anti-Bond' in his blend between sophistication and outright ruthlessness, making him a genuinely chilling antagonist.

The only real negative is the film's 'Bond girl', Mary Goodnight. Though she doesn't really show up until a fair way through the film, once she eventually does she quickly establishes herself as one of the worst Bond girls of the lot.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A fun little movie where the comedic interludes are barely restrained. Sadly however little survives to provide Patrick McNee with the opportunity to flesh it out in a suitable documentary - an in depth interview with Christopher Lee would have been nice.
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Format: Blu-ray
I used to love 'The Man With The Golden Gun' when I was younger. I loved the fact that Tattoo from 'Fantasy Island' was in it and that it was full of humour. As I got older and more critical of films, it's one of the Bond films that I consider to be inferior.
'Live and Let Die' had been a very solid debut for Moore's Bond and it looked like the producers had finally managed to replace Sean Connery with an actor who could put his own mark on the role, but this film is a bit of a step back when it shouldn't have been. The idea of James Bond playing a game of cat and mouse all over south East Asia with the world's most deadly assassin should make for an excellent movie, and for the first 30-40 minutes, it is.
Bond begins his quest to seek out Christopher Lee's Scaramanga by heading to Beirut for a brief romantic liaison with a belly dancer and a punch up with some heavies, before landing in Hong Kong and threatening an arms manufacturer with a rifle designed for a three-fingered 'hoodlum'. He then stalks Maud Adams tragic Miss Anders and gives her a good hiding in her hotel room. Moore actually plays it with some uncharacteristic menace here which is refreshing, and shows a dangerous side lurking underneath the gentlemanly charm. Things start to take a downward turn when we are introduced to Britt Ekland's air-headed Mary Goodnight and the story becomes less of an exciting face off between two equally matched adversaries and more about a monopoly of solar power, which is hardly inspiring. The camp humour then gets ramped up as Bond engages in a fight with two sumo wrestlers and then, a bunch of Kung-Fu experts at a martial arts 'school', with quips coming thick and fast.
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