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Man, Beast and Zombie: The New Science of Human Nature Paperback – 6 Dec 2001

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Phoenix; New edition edition (6 Dec. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753812959
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753812952
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 3.5 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,016,675 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Amazon Review

Writer and neuroscientist Kenan Malik follows his highly acclaimed The Meaning of Race with the weighty and ambitious Man, Beast and Zombie: What Science Can and Cannot Tell Us About Human Nature. The book, Malik tells us, is "in part an exploration of the scientific arguments about human nature; in part it is a study of cultural history, about the impact of intellectual and cultural changes on scientific conceptions of the human; and in part it is an attempt to understand the philosophical framework within which the contemporary science of Man works". At the heart of the book are well-informed and often discriminating critical discussions of evolutionary psychology and cognitive science. For instance, Malik denies that the claims of sociobiologists or evolutionary psychologists are merely political claims masquerading as scientific ones or that the claims of EP are inherently racist. He treats both sociobiology and EP as serious--albeit seriously flawed--contributions to the debate about human nature.

Malik wants to recover the humanist vision epitomised by Jacob Bronowski's wonderful series of 30 years ago, The Ascent of Man, and to counter the prevailing pessimistic, sceptical, ironic, self-regarding spirit of the age: a view which allows us to think of Man as "weak, wretched, barbarous, savage, inhuman, as maniacs and murderers, tramps, mobs, rabble, flotsam, vermin. But never again, it seems, as dignified and noble, or as the measure of all things".

The shame of it is that Malik's humanist vision is never really fleshed out and so the detailed criticisms of evolutionary psychologists and cognitive scientists swing free of the question of whether or not those particular individuals and their work actually do exacerbate the bleakly pessimistic view of Man Malik describes.

More generally Man, Beast and Zombie falls short of the broad synthesis of philosophy, cultural history and science it purports to be because the various parts do not make a satisfying, persuasive whole. Nevertheless it is still a well-written, detailed and informative book for those interested in the Darwin Wars and the intra/inter-disciplinary squabbles which characterise it. --Larry Brown --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'Man, Beast and Zombie is sure to take its place as the most thoughtful and insightful assessment of the contemporary claims of science. Kenan Malik is even-handed between science's friends and foes, and he steers a course all of his own. Not least, he is a most accomplished writer.' -- Roy Porter

'A ray of common sense in a fog of pseudoscience - Brilliant.' -- Steve Jones --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
4 people found this helpful.
5.0 out of 5 starsExcellent overview of current theories of human nature
on 21 July 2006 - Published on Amazon.com
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4.0 out of 5 starsAn interesting, but somewhat challenging read
on 24 April 2011 - Published on Amazon.com
5.0 out of 5 starsReflections
on 6 May 2011 - Published on Amazon.com

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