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Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism by [Noys, Benjamin]
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Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 131 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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About the Author

Benjamin Noys is a UK-based theorist and critic who teaches at the University of Chichester.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2433 KB
  • Print Length: 131 pages
  • Publisher: Zero Books; Reprint edition (31 Oct. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00NQGOL3W
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #191,592 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
Benjamin Noys’ Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism (Zero 2014) is a really impressive little book not because it offers a scathing critique of the accelerationists – a panzer tank to squash a gnat anyone? – nor because it pierces the commonplace anxiety that everything is speeding up – in a stagnant phase of capital accumulation, that speed hype is particularly transparent. No, I like the book because Noys loves the word equivocation and uses it with dextrous abandon. First of all Marx on India, p9, equivocal it ‘appears’, on the results of British colonial plunder in India (the footnote to Aijaz Ahmad will be worth following up, since limiting Marx’s discussion of the subcontinent to only the first of a great many NYDT articles on India perpetrates a fraud). This pattern is established early – the accelerationists believe the worst will produce the good. variations on the theme abound – and it cannot but leave us saying ‘yes, but’. BUT, the best parts of the book do not owe much at all to the avowed ‘enemy’ here – the discussion of Bataille and Godard – Bataille is ‘equivocal’ on 76 – is the s***. Literally, and the excremental analysis of capitalism accords well with, after all, Marx’s own assessment of economics – he wanted to be done with that s***. Then a chapter on Brecht and Benjamin – ‘equivocal’ on 90 – gives a deep and careful evaluation of the train brake metaphor, observing actual wrecks and actual saves where the brake interrupts disaster. That Benjamin can be offered as the theorist impatient with waiting, 92, is perhaps somewhat sad given his end, but there is much to learn about the more cuddly of the Frankfurt School theorists.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An interesting book, well written, interesting cover. Would read again.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 4 reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Understood almost nothing in this book. But that was ... 14 Sept. 2016
By dan horton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Understood almost nothing in this book. But that was my problem. Actually did open a completely new avenue of thought for me, one I hope I will take a run at.
2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 18 Oct. 2015
By clemens.poole - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I find myself mentioning this book to people constantly. Exactly the kind of dynamic scholarship I fancy.
1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 21 Nov. 2015
By N. T. Bakker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very interesting, critical book
1 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 28 Nov. 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
All good. Thanks!
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