Buy Used
£1.77
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Fun Meister
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A book which is in good overall condition. This means that it will be largely free of page markings, the spine will still be in solid, tight condition and there will be no pages which are missing from the book. The pages may have slightly turned corners but overall the book should be clean to touch and enjoyable to read.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Making Time: Why Time Seems to Pass at Different Speeds and How to Control it Paperback – 3 Jul 2008

3.4 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.97 £0.01
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Icon Books Ltd; Original edition (3 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848310013
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848310018
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2 x 20.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 92,899 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'A fascinating inquiry ... Taylor's book is so absorbing that time will fly by as you read it.'
-- Herald

'Provocative and freewheeling, wilfully unscientific without ever dabbling in pseudoscience, this book will really start you thinking about how you can try to be free.' -- The Independent, July 08

'Provocative and freewheeling... this book will really start you thinking about how you can try to be free.' -- The Independent, July 2008

Review

‘Raising some fasinating questions about the nature of time and answering them admirably, this book will grab your attention, befuddle you slightly and leave you feeling invigorated with a new perspective, if not thoroughly enlightened. Using both psychological and physical science Taylor explores these ideas in an entirely accessible and engaging way, leading the reader calmly through a tangle of theory and philosophy. Time you read it.’ (Crack)

‘In what is both a practical manual and a text-book of psychology, [Steve Taylor] illustrates that time itself is in some senses an illusion determined by circumstances such as our age, our boredom threshold, and our childlike eagerness for exciting things. It is possible to alter our perceptions in order to make time pass quickly or slowly, just as we wish, and Taylor shows how it can be done.’ (Good Book Guide)

‘A fascinating book completely worth reading.’ (Odyssey)

'Provocative and freewheeling, wilfully unscientific without ever dabbling in pseudoscience, this book will really start you thinking about how you can try to be free.' (Independent)

'A fascinating inquiry ... Taylor's book is so absorbing that time will fly by as you read it.' (Herald)

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I did read this book very quickly but it felt like very little time passed while I was reading and now I understand why. As the book points out, absorption makes our experience of time seem to contract. While I was reading I recognised so many experiences from my own life and found myself continually in agreement. The author puts forward a very coherent theory which explains the different perceptions of time we experience in a variety of situations. As such it is extremely thought-provoking and plausible. Later the theories becomes more speculative but still plausible and stimulating, dealing with different states of consciousness and unusual experiences of time slowing down or disappearing. All the way through, even when dealing with quite complicated ideas the book is always very easy to read. You're carried along with the energy of the writing and the enthusiasm for ideas. At the end I feel inspired to try to live my live in a different way, making more time for new experience and trying to live in the present and appreciate each moment.
3 Comments 158 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I saw the author on BBC Breakfast whilst eating my cornflakes a couple of days ago. The issues he was talking about seemed interesting but accessible to a non-scientist, non-clever-person like me. And yes, it's a very enjoyable read. Simply laid out with each chapter taking you through to another level of how time can be stretched and shrunk depending on your perception and your circumstances. It's a simple idea well explained, illustrated with episodes from Mr Taylor's own life (as well as famous sports stars etc) that make the more clever-er concepts easier to understand. I'd recommend it. Weirdly, it made a train journey go extremely quickly. Which has to be a good thing!
Comment 80 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book is full of fascinating insights into why we experience the world the way we do, and in particular the way we experience different perceptions of time. It's one of those books which makes you look at familiar things in a new and fresh light. In particular, I was impressed with the section on time in different cultures, that explains why many indigenous peoples don't have any concept of time or any past or future tenses. Oh to live in one of those timeless cultures! But the book does describe how we can become less focused on time, and even transcend it to some extent. A very absorbing and even life-changing book.
Comment 92 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Some very useful info in this book which has definitely clarified my own thoughts. However the "science" is flawed in places. The first few chapters are quite interesting and seemingly written with sound logical reasoning. But as the chapters progress so the scientific analysis becomes increasingly dubious.

For instance, the author says: "Anybody who approaches the evidence for precognition with an open mind will find it very difficult to dismiss" and goes on to list a number of (dubious) case studies which have resulted in successful precognition. However the author fails to mention than countless case studies in which failed to reach such conclusions. Cherry picking results like this is meaningless in scientific analysis. Referencing Stephen Hawking or Einstein does not make the conclusions any more convincing; in fact I found myself questioning the content of the entire book because of the dubious logic employed in the chapter "The Illusion of Time", which is a great pity.

Logical reasoning aside, the book does highlight the interesting concept of time flow, and demonstrates how to manipulate our own thoughts to control our sense of time. The precise way in which the author labels his conclusions is the saving feature. For that it's worth the money.

Read the last two chapters - the remainder can be dismissed.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I don't usually waste time writing reviews but felt necessary to do so with this book. And what do I have to say about it...wow! I have never come across a book which has been such a complete waste of time to read! And since this is a book about making time, you can see the irony of it. Some might be taken in by the author, as they may be able to relate to his examples. He'll say things like time seems to fly when you're having fun (i.e watching a good movie, playing video games, sports etc) and time seems to drag when you're bored (i.e doing work, chores etc). Obviously it doesn't take an Einstein to figure that out as you go through life but he'll say to the reader; well, have you noticed how time seems to drag when you're washing the dishes because it's so boring. Some readers will agree and think they're getting something useful from the book and those who are fairly intelligent will realise that this book does not teach you anything new.

He repeats the theme of time passes quickly when you are enjoying an activity (absorbed) and slows down when you are bored (not absorbed) throughout the whole book, in different sets of words which became quite annoying as I felt there was so much repitition of this point and other similar points. In some places the author even contradicts himmself, probably without realising. Let me give you an example from the last chapter of the book: "The idea of transforming ourselves in this way might seem far fetched, but in reality it's quite straightforward. At least, the principles are straightforward - actually putting the principles into practice requires a lot of self discipline and effort". Translated to me that says; it seems difficult but is quite straighforward but actually it is difficult.
Read more ›
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback