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Maggot Moon MP3 CD – 12 Feb 2013

4.2 out of 5 stars 91 customer reviews

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MP3 CD, 12 Feb 2013
£8.82 £19.95
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Candlewick on Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (12 Feb. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1469275139
  • ISBN-13: 978-1469275130
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 1.3 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (91 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,396,010 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

'Dazzling, chilling, breathtaking. A perfect book.' --Meg Rosoff

'The outstanding teenage novel of the autumn, arresting and original and written in a singular voice, is Sally Gardner's MAGGOT MOON... Narrated by a boy with dyslexia, Standish Tredwell, it takes you inside the workings of his mind...as well as offering up something much darker: a parable about the perils of totalitarianism. Despite its simple language, its a disturbing read, but it also has a hopeful message - that a teenager, especially one with dyslexia, can have agency in the world.' --Lorna Bradbury, The Telegraph

'This heart-breaking, brilliantly written novel is the most original publication for years, and rivals Margo Lanagan's The Brides of Rollrock Island as my Young Adult Book of the Year.' --Amanda Craig, The Times

'The outstanding teenage novel of the autumn, arresting and original and written in a singular voice, is Sally Gardner's MAGGOT MOON... Narrated by a boy with dyslexia, Standish Tredwell, it takes you inside the workings of his mind...as well as offering up something much darker: a parable about the perils of totalitarianism. Despite its simple language, its a disturbing read, but it also has a hopeful message - that a teenager, especially one with dyslexia, can have agency in the world.' --Lorna Bradbury, The Telegraph

'This heart-breaking, brilliantly written novel is the most original publication for years, and rivals Margo Lanagan's The Brides of Rollrock Island as my Young Adult Book of the Year.' --Amanda Craig, The Times --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review

Dazzling, chilling, breathtaking. A perfect book. (Meg Rosoff, award-winning author of HOW I LIVE NOW)

The outstanding teenage novel of the autumn, arresting and original and written in a singular voice... (Lorna Bradbury The Telegraph)

startlingly original, horribly gripping ... an inspirational [story] which deserves many prizes. (Amanda Craig The Times)

This novel is a celebration of the refusal of the human spirit to be crushed and in Standish, Gardner has created a hero to be cherished. (Sally Morris Daily Mail)

... a unique and compelling read (The Bookseller (Children's Booksellers' Choice: September))

Maggot Moon is a fast-paced, tough and heartbreaking story. I loved it (We Love This Book)

... Maggot Moon is an unusual, deeply moving and thought-provoking story, which has clear potential to become a modern classic (Booktrust's 'September book we like')

... a remarkable novel (Books for Keeps)

This novel will just blow you away (Emma Louise Pennell Waterstones Chichester)

a story that is rich in drama and ideas (Julia Eccleshare Lovereading4kids)

Quite simply, it is a book you have to read. (Bookbag)

Fans of the dystopia genre and conspiracy theorists alike will be flipping the pages of this gem. The story moves at a gripping pace with clever use of language, providing vivid characterization ad setting, while the unexpected twists in the plot will leave readers stunned (Recommended Reads, Children’s Books Ireland)

[Standish's] use of language because of (not despite of) his dyslexia is idiosyncratic poetry, full of fizzing wordplay and deadpan humour. Gardner's novels have always been thought-provoking but she flexes her writing muscles here and Standish is an utterly unique creation, impossible not to love. (The Scotsman) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A fantastic read that is almost impossible to put down - and I rarely did until I'd got to the end! With such short chapters it was too easy to just keep telling myself...just one more chapter! A real page turner, at times emotional, thought-provoking, shocking and upsetting, but a book I will definitely read again.
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Format: Paperback
Introduced in 1939, The Carnegie Medal is perhaps the most prestigious of children's/YA book awards, with any winner (or even shortlisted title) gaining a bank account buckling sales boost. The latest winner (2013) is Maggot Moon by Sally Gardener, a dystopian fable which follows dyslexic protagonist, Standish Tredwell.

Standish lives in a kind of alternate realty in which the `Motherland' has taken control of 1950's England. Surveillance, disappearances and capital punishment are the daily norm, and the rat-infested streets are virtually an inhabitable ruin. It's a pretty grim existence and Standish's dyslexia, fierce imagination, as well as his one blue and one brown eye, make him a prime target for the regime and it's hierarchy of violent bullies.

Fending off starvation thanks to a couple of hens and a meagre vegetable patch, Standish lives with his Gramps in a modest Zone 7 house not far from his brutish school. His parents have been taken by the regime, and he and his grandfather tread the fine line between surviving and subverting their totalitarian oppressors. However, a secret hidden below Standish's house could hold the key to toppling the Motherland. That, or certain death of course.

Maggot Moon is presented in one hundred concise chapters and the writing, particularly the use of metaphor, is stunning - one particular sentence describes Standish's beating heart as `an egg bumping against the side of a pan of boiling water'. Throughout the novel, Gardner's pros are deceptively simplistic and, in many ways, bear more than a passing resemblance to 2012's Carnegie winner, A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.

In Standish's world, the only person he can call a friend him is newcomer to Zone 7, Hector. Even though the pair forge a strong bond, and friendship in the face of adversity is an important theme here, this is no fairy tale and the conclusion has serious emotional clout. A worthy winner indeed.
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By Lovely Treez TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Nov. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Our narrator, the wonderfully named Standish Treadwell, is left bereft when his best friend Hector mysteriously disappears, probably taken by the tyrannical goons of the Motherland - a totalitarian regime where dyslexics like Standish are held in scant regard. The Motherland is intent on winning the space race, getting to the moon first without caring who gets hurts in the process. However, what if it was all one big ploy, designed to keep people in their place? What if someone like Standish, someone perceived to be weak, could debunk the whole scam?
As Standish himself remarks

"You see, the what ifs are as boundless as the stars."

Equally boundless, it would appear, is Sally Gardner's wonderful imagination and ability to draw the reader into another world, a parallel universe not that far removed from our own. Using simple language she presents a brutal world, a scary place where folk like Standish are not expected to stand up for themselves. Standish's neighbourhood, Zone Seven, could be anywhere, any time in history and whilst his day to day life is fraught with danger, he faces the same dilemnas as any teenager - establishing your own identity, forging friendships, learning from your mistakes.

Now shortlisted for the Costa Children's Book Award 2012, Maggot Moon deserves to become a children's classic. Fans of The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time, My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece and Wonder will love this quirky, engaging novel and will perhaps fall a little in love with Standish, your not so average hero. Highly recommended for all ages from 12 upwards.
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By K. J. Noyes TOP 500 REVIEWER on 29 Mar. 2013
Format: Paperback
I've been looking forward to this for ages and whipped through it in just a few hours.
Great dystopian story set in the 1950s, with overtones of Stalinist regimes but in England. Loved the little illustrations throughout at the start of each chapter, a lite story in themselves.
Very brutal in parts for the age range it's written for, but very appropriate to the context.
Standish was a good narrator, his malapropisms charming, his story compelling. Very sad ending but nothing you hadn't expected. Hope this wins more awards, CARNEGIE!!!!
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Format: Hardcover
This is the first book I have read in 2013, and boy has it raised the bar for whatever else I read this year. I think the blurb tells you pretty much all you need to know, so I won't summarise any further - it's one of those occasions where you want to tell people `I won't give too much away - just read it!'.
It's written in deceptively simple prose and in that sense, it's easy to read. I rattled through it because I wanted to find out what happened to Standish and Hector. But at some point I am going to have to go back and reread it to truly appreciate the fine craftsmanship of the writing. On another level, it doesn't make for easy reading because of the truly awful things going on in the Motherland - particularly when you realise with unease that similar things have indeed happened in human history. And are happening still. Sally Gardner is known for her `unique blend of magic and historical realism', and in this case there is the inkling that you might be reading a re-imagined history. It's all the more powerful because the world doesn't feel like some distant dystopia - it all seems very close to home. You really get a sense of the precariousness of the characters' situation, and though they are two very different books, I would compare the emotional response I got from reading Maggot Moon to what I experienced when I read Markus Zusak's The Book Thief. It's both heartbreaking and ultimately hopeful, because it illustrates the eternal presence of friendship, courage and hope in even the most dire of circumstances.
I instantly warmed to the narrator, Standish Treadwill, and his voice is one of those that echoes in your mind long after the story ends.
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