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Lullabies To Paralyze (UK Only Version)
 
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Lullabies To Paralyze (UK Only Version)

21 Mar. 2005 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 4.27 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
1:22
30
2
1:54
30
3
4:14
30
4
4:13
30
5
3:35
30
6
4:01
30
7
2:54
30
8
4:48
30
9
7:15
30
10
6:37
30
11
3:42
30
12
3:02
30
13
4:56
30
14
6:50
30
15
3:15
30
16
3:23
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Product details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
The rush of lengthy reviews for this album are a little tiresome, as is the ridiculous snobery of the reviewer who assumes that a fellow reviewer hasn't listened to QOTSA albums before 'Songs for the Deaf'simply because he alludes to the absence of Dave Grohl- get over yourself man!! The politics aside, this album is a joy. Guitar heaven from start to finish; highlights are the lush 'I never came' which does not 'drag on' as stated by a previous reviewer, but highlights the versatility of Nick's voice, and in placing this track straight after the excellent lead single 'Little Sister' ensures maximum impact. Other high points include CD opener 'This Lullaby' and the fantastic 'Broken Box'. As a whole, the album flows beautifully, yet is more experimental than 'Rated R' and 'SFTD'. Personally speaking I would say 'Lullabies To Paralyze' is the most complete QOTSA album. Bring on Carling Leeds 2005....
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Format: Audio CD
Initial signs for this album weren't promising. The sudden departure of Nick Olivieri marked the departure of the only constant member of Josh Homme's ever-changing QOTSA line-up, and Olivieri seemed as essential to the band as Homme himself. Things could've gone so easily awry for album number 4.
However Josh Homme's track record with other projects (notably Desert Sessions) should've been enough to confirm that he is more than capable of going it alone. Lullabies to Paralyze is a testament to this.
Impressively, the first two songs are knocked off within little more than 3 minutes. The gentle acoustics and tortured-larynx Mark Lanegan vocals of This Lullaby give way to the chugging, razor-sharp Medication, which sounds like a two-minute statement of intent.
The following track is arguably the album's highlight. Everybody Knows That You're Insane starts up as a wailing rock dirge, before a neat shift in tempo takes you into the simple and insanely catchy chorus. Tangled Up In Plaid and Burn The Witch are also superb, both stomp-along anthems of the highest order, before the album's most accessible poppy moment, In Your Head (which also appeared in the Desert Sessions).
Little Sister is fine, if somewhat underwhelming as a lead-off single, whilst I Never Came portrays a subtlety previously unregistered in QOTSA's past works. But it's the next two tracks, Someone's In The Wolf and The Blood Is Love that provide the album's backbone. Both lengthy, brooding, power-chord heavy anthems, they sit perfectly alongside one another. Both recall QOTSA's ability to find a great riff, and then completely bludgeon you with it.
The next three tracks show a dramatic shift in mood, and are amongst the sleaziest things QOTSA have done.
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Format: Audio CD
Remember how you felt when you first heard Songs For The Deaf? I remember liking about 3 of the songs and generally skipping the rest. Get out of that mindset now. If you can't bear to listen to this record - an archetypal "grower" if I ever heard one - more than twice, then you don't understand how to give music a chance.
A Song For The Deaf was always my favourite song on SFTD; with Lullabies to Paralyse, once you get past the fact that yes, there aren't really any Oliveri-screamy songs on there (but try Skin On Skin for a mean slab of meaty riff), you can again appreciate the intricacies of Homme & Co's talents. Listen to Someone's In the Wolf: subtle laying of lead guitars through the song's progression, true QOTSA harmonies, a spittingly evil pre-chorus leading to a chorus that I seriously cannot get the mirrored drums to out of my head. Not that I want to.
The quickfire Medication slips seamlessly into Everybody Knows That You're Insane, a powerful thrash of a song that invades your ears in a way only QOTSA can manage. You've already heard Little Sister, Broken Box is insanely sing-along, leaping into the dark Grimm fairy tale that is You've Got A Killer Scene, which also picks up on the human's subconscious love for songs with wordless phrases (read: Hey Jude, or the excellent E-Pro from Beck - Guero) - both powerful but in altogether polarised ways. It's this ability to entangle you in such a wealth of diversity that makes QOTSA what they really are.
It took about 4 or 5 hearings, but I've fallen into a dark, edgy lust with every song from this album. And if you have any senses then you just might too.
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By A Customer on 9 Mar. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Please ignore the idiot who gave this one star, they are clearly a Grohlite newbie who has no idea about anything and probably doesn't even own Rated R or The Self Titled album...
Most reviews I've read of this spent hald the review talking aboit Nick leaving, so I won't. Josh Homme has said that this record is like the S/T, and certainley with Nick gone (oh dear, I mentioned it) it could quite easily have been a return to the robotic riffery of that record (no, Nick doesn't play on it even though he is on the cover) but I don't see it at all.
I'll do a lazy track by track, 'cos I can't bothered writing a proper review.
LTP begins with a little acoustic ditty called "Lullaby" sung by Mark Lanegan and then goes straight into familiar territory with the pounding stop/start guitars of "Medication" which clocks in at under two minutes.
EKTYI starts out with some nice slide guitar, abut after about a minute you'd be forgiven for wondering where the song is going, but then in comes a big loud guitar-heavy chorus, and you go...."ahh" It sounds like it shouldn't fit, but it does. Great stuff.
Tangled Up In Plaid is quite similar in that it floats about for a minute or two and then the bouncy geetars come in.
There's a few bluesier sounds on this album compared to the others, and this is particularly evident in the magnificent Billy Gibbons-of-ZZ-Top-featuring "Burn The Witch" and the penultimate track "YGAKSTM." "Burn The Witch" is a genius. That's all I have to say on the matter. Mark Lanegan comes in with some gruff backing vocals halfway and it makes you go "woooh.
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