Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lover (The Cutting Edge: Lesbian Life and Literature Series) Hardcover – 1 Oct 1993

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£65.18 £154.95
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 296 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press; New Ed edition (1 Oct. 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814735045
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814735046
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.1 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Product Description

Review

"Violent, funny, beautiful, intelligent."

(

"Harris, an American equivalent of Monique Wittig, ...is ingenious, sardonic, parodic. [She] explores the various roles women have played: grandmother, mother, daughter, sister, wife and second wife, businesswoman in man's clothing, prostitute, factory worker, movie star, muse and tutelary spirit, warrior, artist, fake saint, martyr.")-(Catharine R. Stimpson), ()

(

"Bertha Harris has created a woman's world as relaxed and sisterly and funny as [Joan] Didion's is tense and controlled. [She] presents a utopian vision of a world where women are in charge of themselves, and where, it is nice to note, they are very good company indeed." )-("The New York Review of Books"), ()

(

"Violent, funny, beautiful, intelligent.")-(Jane Rule), ()

(

"The introduction [is] by turns funny, sad, moving, and outrageous...[Harris] illuminates the New York women's art and literary scene of the late sixties and seventies; the introduction alone is worth the price of the book. Altogether, Lover is everything a seduction should be--smart, unpredictable, witty, provocative—: and sexy." )-(Carolyn Allen), (University of Washington)

(

"A wonder...I was seduced by its tantalizing elusiveness, its audacity, its sheer brio...a spellbinding, verbal sleight of hand as satisfying as it is serpentine.")-("The Washington Post Book World"), ()

"Harris, an American equivalent of Monique Wittig, ...is ingenious, sardonic, parodic. [She] explores the various roles women have played: grandmother, mother, daughter, sister, wife and second wife, businesswoman in man's clothing, prostitute, factory worker, movie star, muse and tutelary spirit, warrior, artist, fake saint, martyr."-Catharine R. Stimpson,

"The introduction [is] by turns funny, sad, moving, and outrageous...[Harris] illuminates the New York women's art and literary scene of the late sixties and seventies; the introduction alone is worth the price of the book. Altogether, Lover is everything a seduction should be--smart, unpredictable, witty, provocative—: and sexy." -Carolyn Allen, University of Washington

"Violent, funny, beautiful, intelligent."-Jane Rule,

"Bertha Harris has created a woman's world as relaxed and sisterly and funny as [Joan] Didion's is tense and controlled. [She] presents a utopian vision of a world where women are in charge of themselves, and where, it is nice to note, they are very good company indeed." -"The New York Review of Books",

"A wonder...I was seduced by its tantalizing elusiveness, its audacity, its sheer brio...a spellbinding, verbal sleight of hand as satisfying as it is serpentine."-"The Washington Post Book World",

Bertha Harris has created a woman's world as relaxed and sisterly and funny as [Joan] Didion's is tense and controlled. [She] presents a utopian vision of a world where women are in charge of themselves, and where, it is nice to note, they are very good company indeed." -"The New York Review of Books""

"Harris, an American equivalent of Monique Wittig, ...is ingenious, sardonic, parodic. [She] explores the various roles women have played: grandmother, mother, daughter, sister, wife and second wife, businesswoman in man's clothing, prostitute, factory worker, movie star, muse and tutelary spirit, warrior, artist, fake saint, martyr."-Catharine R. Stimpson

"A wonder...I was seduced by its tantalizing elusiveness, its audacity, its sheer brio...a spellbinding, verbal sleight of hand as satisfying as it is serpentine."-"The Washington Post Book World"

"Violent, funny, beautiful, intelligent."-Jane Rule

"The introduction [is] by turns funny, sad, moving, and outrageous...[Harris] illuminates the New York women's art and literary scene of the late sixties and seventies; the introduction alone is worth the price of the book. Altogether, Lover is everything a seduction should be smart, unpredictable, witty, provocative—: and sexy." -Carolyn Allen, University of Washington"

About the Author

Bertha Harris is also the author of Confessions of Cherubino and Catching Saradove. She lives in Tennyson, Massachusetts, and continues to write compelling, eccentric and faintly indecent fiction.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Recently at a Gay and Lesbian coffeehouse, I read a brief excerpt from _Lover_ to a group of predominantly Lesbian friends. Afterward, several of them approached me, grinning from ear to ear and asking, "What was that funny, terrific book you read?"
Good question. To call Bertha Harris's _Lover_ a "novel" doesn't quite do it justice. The nonlinear narrative, fluid identities, and general postmodern sensibility guarantee that plot and character, those two mainstays of novelistic form, will quickly fall by the wayside.
So what is _Lover_? Bertha Harris calls this book a "tap-dance," a "pleasure dome," and an act of seduction. I would add, more trivially, that it's a Lesbian-centered family history, focusing on the relations of a matrix of women characters. That doesn't do justice to the book either, but it comes closer.
Ultimately, _Lover_ can best be described as a dazzling literary performance, designed to give pleasure to the reader. Some of the pleasure is embedded deep within the text, in the connections between seemingly unrelated vignettes; Harris provides a helpful guide to these connections in the "family tree" (actually more like tangled vines) that opens the novel.
But there's a great deal of surface pleasure, too, and it's no less intense or profound. _Lover_ can be enjoyed in the moment for its droll wit, its crystalline prose, and most of all, its (largely) unabashed expression of sexual desire. It's no accident that Bertha Harris co-authored _The Joy of Lesbian Sex_.
So why isn't _Lover_ better known? There are several reasons, most of them connected to the strange politics of the publishing (and reviewing) world.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
How is it possible that not one person who have bought this title has been moved to write a review about this book?! If you have tried to read it and "couldn't get into it", DON"T GIVE UP! Please give it another try! Lover is, at first, a difficult read. That is one of the reasons why I like the introduction by the author...she tells you why she wrote it that way and how to go about reading it. Once you slip into the style, you will find a wonderful, funny, and at times, horribly real story full of wisdom, wit, pain, and humor. I have read this book several times, and have it underlined and dog-eared, with notes scribbled in the margins. I constantly return to it for words of wisdom, favorite quotes, or a laugh or two.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x87677510) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x878b5528) out of 5 stars "What was that funny, terrific book?" 7 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Recently at a Gay and Lesbian coffeehouse, I read a brief excerpt from _Lover_ to a group of predominantly Lesbian friends. Afterward, several of them approached me, grinning from ear to ear and asking, "What was that funny, terrific book you read?"
Good question. To call Bertha Harris's _Lover_ a "novel" doesn't quite do it justice. The nonlinear narrative, fluid identities, and general postmodern sensibility guarantee that plot and character, those two mainstays of novelistic form, will quickly fall by the wayside.
So what is _Lover_? Bertha Harris calls this book a "tap-dance," a "pleasure dome," and an act of seduction. I would add, more trivially, that it's a Lesbian-centered family history, focusing on the relations of a matrix of women characters. That doesn't do justice to the book either, but it comes closer.
Ultimately, _Lover_ can best be described as a dazzling literary performance, designed to give pleasure to the reader. Some of the pleasure is embedded deep within the text, in the connections between seemingly unrelated vignettes; Harris provides a helpful guide to these connections in the "family tree" (actually more like tangled vines) that opens the novel.
But there's a great deal of surface pleasure, too, and it's no less intense or profound. _Lover_ can be enjoyed in the moment for its droll wit, its crystalline prose, and most of all, its (largely) unabashed expression of sexual desire. It's no accident that Bertha Harris co-authored _The Joy of Lesbian Sex_.
So why isn't _Lover_ better known? There are several reasons, most of them connected to the strange politics of the publishing (and reviewing) world. _Lover_ was originally published in paperback, at a time when paperback fiction was deemed inherently unworthy of a mainstream book review; and it was an explicitly Lesbian novel, at a time when Lesbian fiction was even more marginalized from the literary mainstream than it is now.
Only a few people, mostly Lesbian separatists, gave _Lover_ much notice when it was first published (and the publicity campaign, or relative lack thereof, probably didn't help). And when Daughters Inc., the novel's original publishers, went bankrupt, _Lover_ disappeared completely from view--until NYU press revived the work in 1993, complete with a new (and, for me, indispensable) preface by Harris herself.
Harris's controversial story of the rise and fall of Daughters Inc.--and of her own career as a Lesbian writer--provides an "overture" to the book, stating specific themes of the work and giving a specific personal, political and psychological context for the action to come. With this new preface, _Lover_ stands out as a masterpiece of 20th-century literature.
In all likelihood, your public library doesn't have a copy of _Lover_. That's all the more reason to buy a copy of your own.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x87a1e6f0) out of 5 stars A Postmodern Masterpiece 5 Mar. 2007
By Gentle Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I completely agree with the other reviewers here. Lover is, in its own way, as hard as James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, or William Faulkner, and the style is highly original rather than an imitation of any of them. It takes two or three reads to even begin to get what the novel is doing, but the payoff is so high. When I teach difficult novels, I often tell my students that the only thing I require of them is readers is that they not give up and refuse to finish the book. This one, I must say, even challenged graduate students to stay with it, but they were so happy they did. The novel should be up there with the best of not only lesbian fiction, but modernist/postmodernist narrative, and taught in a variety of university literature courses. And any non-academic who loves the English language will have a ball with it.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback