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Love Lessons by [Wilson, Jacqueline]
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Love Lessons Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 159 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

'A brilliant young writer of wit and subtlety' THE TIMES; 'Hugely popular with seven to ten year olds: she should be prescribed for all cases of reading reluctance' INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY; 'Has a rare gift for writing lightly and amusingly about emtional issues' BOOKSELLER

Review

'Jacqueline Wilson at her very best.' (Publishing News)

'Sensitive and insightful story ... Demonstrates perfectly why this author is adored by her legions of fans.' (The Bookseller)

'Deserves three cheers ... The most richly enjoyable Wilson novel for years.' (The Times)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 782 KB
  • Print Length: 276 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0552553522
  • Publisher: RHCP Digital; New Ed edition (4 Sept. 2008)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0031RS3NK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 159 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,733 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read this book when I was in my early teens and loved it. Re-reading it now at 18 I got a really big shock. Much more wise about the world (although still not very) than I was back then, I can see that this is one messed up book with worrying morals considering the age group it's directed at. It basically sends the message that there is nothing wrong with an older teacher reciprocating feelings a FOURTEEN year old student has for him. And not just any old student, but a vulnerable one who has led a sheltered life and had little social interaction and certainly no 'street smarts'. I definitely wouldn't let anyone younger than myself read this.

Futhermore, I found the main character, Prue, to be utterly unlikeable. She's a self-centered, arrogant little priss who thinks nothing of making fun of a boys (who obviously likes her) dyslexia. I know she isn't meant to be massively likeable but it got the point where it was just irritating and I was facepalming on a regular basis.

I can honestly say though that there were likeable characters like Grace and Toby, and I can never find fault with Jacqueline Wilsons writing in itself. As always, she's a good writer, but unfortunately the contents of this book left much to be desired.
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Format: Paperback
I love most JW books, but this is AWFUL!
it encourages a relationship between a 14 year old and a male teacher, who is a willing participant. Then to make it worse and the end of the book all the blame is put on the minor. Seriously disappointed in JW don't understand how this even got published.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Im a huge fan of the Jacqueline Wilson books, each book targets children and young adults and Jaqueline Wilson writes a lot about the things most of us have suffered from as a child.
Bad Girls targets the issues of bullying.
Lola Rose targets the issues of domestic abuse.
Dustbin Baby targets abandonment etc etc.
Although i was lucky enough to never experience any of the above, it really opened my eyes to what some children do suffer.

Love Lessons, however, seems to only target 14 year old girls who regularly swap saliva with their school teachers.
I found the story of this book just ridiculous and very perverted.
Not once in this book does anyone (Not Prudence ((the main character)), her sister Grace, or Sarah) mention that what Prudence and her teacher are doing is VERY wrong.
There's a few comments made from the teacher, Mr Raxberry, about how Prudence is only 14, yet he stills carries on with her.
As a 20 year old girl myself, i could see just how much this book could warp the mind of young girls, it could even contribute to making some girls think that being 14 and having it off with men in there late 20's is a bit naughty, but so cool?

I'd be very cautious of what kind of age group would be reading this book, as i personally feel nobody under the age of 16 should be privy to this kind of content.
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Format: Hardcover
As an avid adult reader, I was curious to try a Jacqueline Wilson book and sat down one wet Saturday to read Love Lessons. A good book is a good book, regardless of your age. But this was a real disappointment and when I finished the last page I actually uttered out loud to myself "What a strange and dodgy story!"

On the one hand, there are some excellent passages - Prue's awkwardness and isolation at her new school is described in vivid and raw detail and the way that her family dealt with the her father's sudden illness and its conseqences was very poignant and engaging. I really felt for the characters and their dilemmas.

I knew the book would deal with a friendship between student and teacher, but I was horrified that it was actually a reciprocal relationship - and that she was merely 14 years old!! That really threw me. Don't get me wrong, I love an old forbidden romance, but there are boundaries in terms of morals and taste, and the relevant chapters left me quite uncomfortable. More often than not, I skimmed over them a bit nonplussed.

While we all had a crush on a teacher at some point, and convinced ourselves that they might just reciprocate, I think in most cases we grew up to realise that we were very lucky they didn't. Any adult that is sexually drawn to a child of 14 is not crush material. What was Jacqueline Wilson - and her publisher - thinking?! There is no condemnation in the book of his behaviour - and there really isn't any reason given for this 20-somthing year old man with a wife and two kids to suddenly risk his family and job in the pursuit of an underage girl. Furthermore, when the school principal suspects a relationship, she suggests the girl leaves the school so that he can keep his job. Bizarre!
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Format: Paperback
Love Lessons is another foray into the hormone-rushing world of the teenage girl and this time, Jackie really means business! Tackling a subject she herself has admitted to being 'difficult', Wilson has given herself a double-bubble helping of trouble by veering away from 'typical teens' like the delightful Ellie, Magda and Nadine; instead presenting us with Prudence, a girl with an unfortunate name, home life and wardrobe. Prudence is about as far away from the norm as you can get. We have, of course, been presented with children from dysfunctional families before (The Diamond Girls and The Illustrated Mum are prime examples of this) but by today's standards Prudence and her chubby sister Grace really are outsiders. Not only are they home-schooled by their bossy, domineering and old fashioned father, Bernard, they also live in virtual poverty - enduring an unpleasantly puritan life free of mod-cons, treats,and contact with the outside world. They are not free, however, of -horror of horrors - vile homemade outfits fashioned from fabric offcuts. This is perhaps the most extraordinary family set up we have been presented with so far, and when you know this is combined with the 'taboo' subject of a teacher-student relationship you know you'll be in for an interesting read.
And interesting Love Lessons is. It is a mixture of searing reality on one hand, and almost ludicrously naive fantasy on the other. First, the good stuff. The real stuff. The sense of shame, embarrassment and loneliness on Prudence' part is tangible throughout the book, and she is a very entertaining character. Considering her position socially and emotionally, she is a surprisingly outspoken and fiesty heroine, refusing to be put down by the predjudice she is subject to once she finally gets a true taste of the outside world.
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