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Love Always Audio Download – Unabridged

4.1 out of 5 stars 71 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 17 hours and 45 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Whole Story Audiobooks
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 15 Aug. 2011
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005HE8S7Q
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really feel like they've made a mistake with the cover of this book. I was expecting random average chick lit, bit of romance, happy ending etc. This is actually a very cleverly written and intriguing tale about a young woman uncovering her families long hidden secrets.

On the day of her grandmother's funeral, Natasha Kapoor's life is at an all time low. Her business is heading for bankruptcy, her marriage is on the rocks. Her Grandfather gives her a few pages of her Aunt Cecily's diary, written in the weeks before she tragically died in an accident at the age of 15. As Natasha reads the diary she is swept back into the past, finding out perhaps more than she wanted to about her family's past.

A really interesting and compelling read. Much more thought provoking than I had bargained for when I chose this book.
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By Elaine Simpson-long VINE VOICE on 31 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I have read all of Harriet Evan's books and have enjoyed them all though I have rather regarded them as light romantic reads, nothing wrong with that of course, but this latest on Love Always is a little more than that. I think it is her best book yet with more depth and characterisation than her previous titles.

Natasha Kapoor returns to Cornwall to attend the funeral of her grandmother and it is clear there are tensions and divisions within the family which can be traced back to the tragic death of Natasha's Aunt Cecily who died when she was only fifteen. Amongst her grandmother's possessions are pages of the diary that the teenager kept in the summer she died and this leads Natasha to investigate and to try to understand the effect this death had on them all.

Flashing backwards and forwards in time, we read Cecily's diary and read first hand her thoughts on the events of that summer, teenage love, family rivalry and adult behaviour that woke her up to reality. I am not going to say too much as I certainly don't want to give the plot away, but there are twists and turns throughout.

I found this book pretty unputdownable and sat and read it straight through in one afternoon. Very much reminded me of Rosamunde Pilcher, not a bad thing let's face it, and I feel this book is streets ahead of her earlier writing. Thoroughly enjoyable and an excellent read.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was a great fan of Harriet Evans' first three novels, but was very disappointed in her fourth, 'I Remember You' - so I'm glad that she's back on form (up to a point) in this latest book. This novel is set partly in 2009, following Natasha Kapoor as she struggles with both her marriage and her failing jewellery company, and partly in 1963, when Natasha's mother, aunts and cousins were teenagers, spending the summer in the family's fantastic retreat at `Summercove', in Cornwall. When Natasha's grandmother dies and she goes down to Cornwall for the funeral, she discovers the diary of her aunt Cecily, who died at the age of fifteen during that fateful summer, and the plot begins to unfold.

The structure of this novel immediately indicates that it's going to be about family secrets hidden and revealed, and - disclaimer - I'm really not a fan of novels about family secrets, as they are usually incredibly predictable and cliched. Evans doesn't really avoid these pitfalls in the 2009 section - I didn't find Natasha a particularly convincing character and the supporting cast, including her relatives, are very sketchy. Perhaps partly because of this, I found it really hard in the first section to keep track of who was who, and would have appreciated a family tree. The book also lurches into melodrama as Natasha confronts her grandfather and her mother, and tries to work out what is happening between herself and her husband, Oli. Therefore I wasn't looking forward at all to the 1963 section - usually in popular fiction a chance for the author to indulge in mock-history and brooding weather patterns.

I was very pleasantly surprised.
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3 Comments 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really enjoyed Harriet Evan's new book, Love always follows Natasha's discovery of her dead aunts diary from the 60's. The book is half set in modern day london and half set in 62 in Cornwall. I was hooked and read the book in 2days, could hardly put it down. The cross cultural aspect was a relcome relief as most chic lit books dont ever touch on anything other then the love story but in the past sections we see how being half indian and half english in 1960 had a life long impact on the characters. Its not too heavy, well worth a read esspecialy if you enjoy Marian Keyes Older books and Cathy Kelly. The end of the book was a nice surprise I didnt see it coming which goes to show how good a writer Harriet Evens really is. I hope her future books live up to this one. It was also make an excellent film
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Format: Paperback
So much so that I read it in less than 3 days, all 491 pages of it. The first observation is that this is not chick lit. The cover, however, could give that impression at first look (I have the 2011 paperback edition) which features a stylised picture of a girl walking down the street holding a large bouquet. I think the cover image is meant to portray Brick Lane, where many parts of the story take place but it is misleading. This is contemporary fiction, a family saga. I began reading Susan Howatch family sagas when I was in my teens and I think this is why I appreciated this book so much. This is only my second Harriet Evans but I really like her writing and will be seeking out her other books.

The back cover drew me in straight away with the reference to finding a diary from the past and various problems to solve in the present day as well as those from the past. I was very curious to find out everything. The story is split into two time zones, contemporary (2009) London and 1963 Cornwall. Very distinct voices are used for both parts; first person narration by Natasha in the present day and third person objective narrative for the scenes set in Cornwall.

Natasha has a good few personal problems and we first meet her on the way to Cornwall for her grandmother's funeral, although we already know that in 1963 an illicit meeting took place on the beach in Cornwall which is seen by someone who shouldn't have. This sets the scene for the story and how the past has influenced the present, and all the years in between. After the funeral she is given a diary belonging to her aunt Cecily who died in 1963 aged 15, and this is extremely enlightening when we get to read it for ourselves.
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