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Lost in Translation Vol 1: (Rediscovering the Hebrew Roots of Our Faith) Paperback – 1 Nov 2007

3.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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  • Lost in Translation Vol 1: (Rediscovering the Hebrew Roots of Our Faith)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 218 pages
  • Publisher: Selah Publishing Group (Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589301994
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589301993
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.2 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 635,776 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Klein is an associate professor of art history at the University of Missouri-Columbia.


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I found it difficult to know where to start with this critique so I'll begin with the sub-title "Rediscovering the Hebrew roots of our Faith". If this is what you really want to do then this book is not the one you should be starting with. To do that read Marvin Wilson "Our Father Abraham"; Oskar Skarsaune "In the shadow of the Temple" and Brad Young "Meet the Rabbi's". Also investigate the excellent material from "First Fruits of Zion", "En-Gedi Resource Centre" and other serious but accessible academics and speakers like David Bivin and Dwight Pryor.

This book which is written in a very easy to read style began with much promise, but I quickly grew uneasy as it progressed. It makes some very interesting statements as facts, but there were not adequate references (to my satisfaction) to back up or support what was being said. I was therefore never really sure that I could trust what they were claiming. This became more important as the book developed and moved into areas that the authors themselves admitted were controversial. They also make extensive use of the Book of Enoch to support their ideas. I know both Peter and Jude selectively quoted from Enoch, but that does not mean that we can do so freely and uncritically.

The book starts dealing with the language and culture of the second Temple period, and rightly stresses the importance of understanding this when reading and interpreting the scriptures. The next chapters on various types of Covenants and Betrothal are all very interesting but I would like to have known more about their sources to confirm and support the ideas that they were developing. This is important as their covenant themes are referred to throughout this and the following books.
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Another of the 3 volumes from the series, excellant and refreshing, definalty reccemmend a read and gives another perspective on Revelation. Love learning to understand 1st centuary Judaisum.
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First the good - there are some interesting facts in the book regardng Jewish practices and so when you first begin to read it, you begin to think that it is going to live up to the promise of its sub-title.

However as you get further into the book, facts are replaced by opinion and theory. There is of course nothing wrong with opinions and theories but particularly in regard to theology, you need a lot of reference material, especially scriptural to support your particular theory and interpretation over and above those of others.

As has been remarked by a previous reviewer, the substantiation for the theories is often somewhat sparse and as many of them are very well defined and precise but also very contraversial, the requirement for support for them is so much greater. This applies especially to the distinction between types of angels and the definition of demons. There seems to be a desire to distance God from the death of people as in the explanation that all the people killed in the flood were actually tainted by Fallen Angel genetics and therefore not really human. A suggestion is also made that such 'nephilim' still exist today and although they look like people, they really are not human but essentially demonic. This seems to be going towards some very dangerous territory.

As you go on through the book, you find factual errors, which begins to undermine yout confidence in whether the earlier information was accurate or not, as well as giving even less confidence in the poorly supported theories. Examples are that Abadon (who is described as a fallen angel from the top rank of angels along with the Satan) actually killed the first born in Egypt, being given the title of 'Angel of Death' to support that.
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hebrew roots of our faith
great book/...loved it took a few days to arrive though and was eager to read it
I dont have time for these reviews
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 99 reviews
201 of 218 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Volume 1 of Lost in Translation 9 Jun. 2010
By A. J. Montgomery - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I found it difficult to know where to start with this critique so I'll begin with the sub-title "Rediscovering the Hebrew roots of our Faith". If this is what you really want to do then this book is not the one you should be starting with. To do that read Marvin Wilson "Our Father Abraham"; Oskar Skarsaune "In the shadow of the Temple" and Brad Young "Meet the Rabbi's". Also investigate the excellent material from "First Fruits of Zion", "En-Gedi Resource Centre" and other serious but accessible academics and speakers like David Bivin and Dwight Pryor.

This book which is written in a very easy to read style began with much promise, but I quickly grew uneasy as it progressed. It makes some very interesting statements as facts, but there were not adequate references (to my satisfaction) to back up or support what was being said. I was therefore never really sure that I could trust what they were claiming. This became more important as the book developed and moved into areas that the authors themselves admitted were controversial. They also make extensive use of the Book of Enoch to support their ideas. I know both Peter and Jude selectively quoted from Enoch, but that does not mean that we can do so freely and uncritically.

The book starts dealing with the language and culture of the second Temple period, and rightly stresses the importance of understanding this when reading and interpreting the scriptures. The next chapters on various types of Covenants and Betrothal are all very interesting but I would like to have known more about their sources to confirm and support the ideas that they were developing. This is important as their covenant themes are referred to throughout this and the following books.

I was very uneasy with the next chapter on "devils, demons and the nephilim". They admit that they are being controversial but I do not think that their case for demons being the departed spirits/souls of the nephilim is at all convincing or safe. I also felt that they were on dangerous ground with their treatment in Myths and Legends from around the world and what they call "counter-covenant". Moses was emphatic that we were not to enquire into how the pagans worshiped "their gods" and not to apply their principles to our faith (Deut 12:29-32). I am unhappy with a perspective which suggests that everything satan does has been copied from the true God, so there must be some truth in it. Even if that were true, it ignores the possibility that the truth has been so distorted that it is impossible to discern what that truth was. Best stick to what God has chosen to reveal than guess through what satan has "copied". Given that caveat I realise that some legends can be helpful in the corroboration of biblical stories like the flood, but I believe caution is advised where the bible is not so explicit.

There is a chapter on the Menorah and the tabernacle in which they blend in their thoughts on the various covenants. Without more references it was difficult to discern what was from an overactive imagination, and what was from genuine research. I understand the menorah theme will return in volume 2 as they attempt to expound on the Book of Revelation.

The book's chapter on the Festivals is too superficial for my liking and leaves too many gaps. I would advise anyone interested in the Festivals to read several of the many other books which are dedicated exclusively to them instead. The authors do concede that they have been unable to go into as much depth as they would like in all their subjects and suggest that more will be revealed in volume two.

There is also a chapter which tries to marry the science of colours and what is claimed to be their meanings in the scriptures. This is then linked with the different covenants God made with various men and mankind, and interpretations are made from this. Hmmmm.

Some of the statements made suggested that the authors' outlook and research was restricted. For instance they refer to the days of the week being named after Hellenistic or Scandinavian deities. This is true in English, but not all languages. In Spanish and Portuguese for example, "Saturday" is named "Sabado" -from the Hebrew Sabbath. This meant that some assumptions applied to Anglo-American culture, but not for others. In this internet age when book markets are now truly "global", I think we should take more care. It can undermine your argument when you are read by people who live where what you say is not true.

Overall I felt the scholarship in this book was amateur. When making new and controversial claims, you really have to have better references from kosher sources to support your position. I intend to read volume two, but am going to be on my guard. I certainly would not recommend this book to any one new to Christianity or to the Hebraic roots of the Christian faith. I am reminded of the advice of the sages concerning the first two chapters of Ezekiel. These are read at Shavuot/Pentecost which includes celebrating the giving of Torah. The advice is not to seek mystical experiences or revelation until you are first firmly grounded in Torah or scriptures. In line with this I would counsel leaving this book until you had several years of reading other foundational sources such as mentioned at the beginning of this review.
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68 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lost in Translation 24 Feb. 2008
By Rev19:16 - Published on Amazon.com
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I could not recommend this book more highly. The authors give convincing evidence and argument demonstrating that the bible originally composed in Hebrew rises to over 90 percent. Their are several scripture verses discussed in which the depth of the meaning just doesn't come over from the Greek translation, and it makes much more sense in context when explained from the Hebrew language and the cultural background. The study of the Hebrew betrothal to marriage process is so very interesting and it is impossible to really understand many of the things Jesus said and the book of revelations without understanding that. They discuss the four cups of wine involved in the betrothal process and what they mean. How much meaning does the words of Jesus in the garden, 'if it were possible let this cup pass from me, however not my will but yours be done.' In reference to the cup of suffering, one of the betrothal cups! Nothing Jesus said or did was without great meaning, if we understand it as He meant it. The Lord's words, 'I go to prepare a place for you' are another milestone in the betrothal process! There is teaching regarding the menorah, the Festivals, & Color. All of these subjects are brought out richly through how God instructed the ancient Hebrews and Israelites. There is also a good teaching on the book of Enoch, which was part of the Hebrew scripture's cannon at the time of Christ, and was referred to by many other book of the bible. The book of Enoch was found intact with the Dead Sea scrolls, the old manuscript of the old testament ever found. The Menorah becomes a literal framework for the book of Revelation. If you are a serious student, or just a lover of God wanting to understand His revelation to us in a deeper way, you will want this book.
It is a wonderful, deep and balanced teaching. I appreciate the work of the authors, and can not wait for the next book in the series.
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good book but I have one complaint 12 April 2010
By captain R - Published on Amazon.com
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This book is absolutely incredible but let me get straight to my complaint. I was so thrilled with it I ordered the book ,"Devils and Demons, the return of the Nephilim" by the same authors. ITS THE SAME BOOK! So I would recommend the book but don't think you are getting a different book with a different title. Buy only one with whatever cover you like best.
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ding-dong: The Giants Are Dead! 10 Jun. 2010
By cheidt - Published on Amazon.com
Lost in Translation: Rediscovering the Hebrew Roots of Our Faith is one of the best treatments of the issue concerning the "Nephilim" (Heb. "naphal": cast down, to fall) giants, or men of "renown" (in Heb. "shem", or base character) listed as adversaries of Israel in the Tanakh, the Hebrew Old Testament. The first instance of these beings is in Genesis 6:4.

Klein and Spears are both known as teachers of the Hebrew scriptures, and in "Lost In Translation", the reader will not only find a wealth of practical knowledge, they will be endued with a new (or renewed) appreciation for the Hebrew language. The authors are obvious scholars, but unlike the majority of scholars who publish to inform, the authors haven't lost the sense of joy, the eagerness that comes with learning and discovery; their love for the subject is infectious. That mix of scholarship and joyful exuberance came through for this reader with each chapter and each turned page. Klein and Spears present for our benefit an understanding of the high premium that God, the Lord, places on confirming His covenants. Considering both of the Testaments from an exclusively Jewish perspective is the key to experiencing the text's fullness; appreciating it a lavish gift given by a supernatural Source, God Himself. "Lost In Translation" is an accomplishment, because it does all I've described, without being overbearing.

Believer's, I don't mean to preach, but: Jesus Christ is Jewish! So many Christians today often find themselves perplexed, when some aspect of their Christian life and service draws the hostile fire of God's avowed and terribly vicious enemies. The Bible indicates that effective ministers and practitioners of the Truth, should be prepared to encounter harassment from the world, the flesh, and likewise, the devil (Ha Satan). We (including myself) should be proactive in prayer and well-armored up for longterm siege; spiritual warfare. Knowledge of even the basics of the Hebrew language dramatically enlarges one's biblical understanding, concerning the identity of our "unnamed" false accuser (his name is not "Lucifer": buy the book and be informed...)- what motivates the devil and his fallen armies, and why these once glorious beings are employing every means and stratagem to effect mortal harm to us and to those tied to us.

This book isn't wartime propaganda, it is invaluable truth; heavenly weaponry. The better we understand it-- fully and exactly, what God has already given in His Word, the more liberty all believers in Yeshua will know. It was given for advancing the conquest and cause of Yeshua! We who love Him really must seek to arm ourselves as fully as possible, especially in this latter day. It is knowledge that is our primary weapon; it is the lack of knowledge that destroys the people of God, and He laments over it.

["Call to Me and I will answer you, and I will tell you great and mighty things, which you do not know." Jeremiah 33:3 NASB]

This book told me things I did not know, much of it due to my own passivity. I had not chosen to avail myself to search out what can be known. I pray the Jeremiah 33:3 promise myself every day, and "Lost In Translation" became an answer to that prayer, the first resource God made available to me in the process of assimilating the unknowns that can be known, if you simply search for them, and start reading. I came away from "Lost In Translation" thinking: "Wow, no wonder Jesus loved the Torah, and no wonder He always quoted from the Tanakh!"

We really should love the Jewish culture. We should want to understand, even participate, in Israel's feasts and festivals. We should make it a personal quest to grasp, as best we can, the mindset of the common Israelite. He's still calling Israelites today! It is from a Hebrew mindset that Yeshua taught His students, who called Him their beloved "Rabbi". "Lost In Translation" identifies by its own title, what believers indifferent to Hebrew, are missing out on; it could enlarge their devotional time, needful for complete apprehension of scriptural promises, and in counseling one another-- all of these things are enhanced with an understanding of Hebrew.
I really could go on, but people disdain reading and preaching; I'll tie this baby up.

It's all about how much Truth you want to apprehend-- how much you want to know Jesus.

Hebrew scripture, the Bible, is a ready study for the simple (which applies to me...); and simultaneously, it is food for kings (or aspiring kings) who intend to fully search out matters; to plunder the Word, so to speak, as much as they find they are able. There are myriad truths as yet uncovered, still preserved therein, in living letters and prophetic pictures. God will go as deep as you want to go! The first step is simply knowing: Through the Hebrew, God still speaks the same truths that have been before our faces the whole time, though certain steps are necessary to fully appropriate it. How can one live something he has not understood?

Read (more than once) "Lost In Translation". Klein and Spears provide insights that are worthy of consideration, retention, and deep reflection. I am eagerly anticipating the release of Klein and Spears' next book...
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Each and every 'Christian' should read this book 12 Feb. 2014
By Chuck - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is the first book I have read that approaches the 'end times' from a Hebrew wedding, marriage contract, and covenant perspective. Wake up! If you follow Yeshua (Jesus is His Christian nick name) then you must read this book. I shows the correct view point in which the entire Bible should be read: Yeshua was a Jew, His followers were Jews and He came to the Jews first. This book may open your eyes to the way the Bible should be read: from a Hebrew perspective. It's an eye opener and not at all heretical. It makes one gain a deeper appreciation, love, and awe for the God of the Universe who will reign from Israel. Definitely read all three volumes and you will know more than most everyday Christians. Bravo to the authors for writing this.
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