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The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring 2001 Subtitles

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Part one of the fantasy trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien. Frodo (Elijah Wood) is a hobbit living in the Shire, a quiet, peaceful part of Middle Earth. When it turns out that his elderly relative Bilbo (Ian Holm) is harbouring the ultimate Ring of Power and the evil Nazgul riders of Sauron are coming to find it, Frodo is entrusted by wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellen) to deliver the Ring out of the Shire without it falling into their hands. Frodo leaves the Shire aided by his cousins Merry (Dominic Monaghan), Pippin (Billy Boyd) and trusty friend Sam Gamgee (Sean Astin), but they soon realise that the agents of Mordor are everywhere and that their trip is far from over. Once they reach the Elvish realm of Rivendell the Hobbits form part of the anti-Sauron fellowship, which includes Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), Boromir (Sean Bean), Legolas Greenleaf (Orlando Bloom), Gimli the dwarf and of course Gandalf. Together they must battle across Middle Earth to destroy the Ring by casting it into the Cracks of Doom, the fiery chasm in the centre of Mordor.

Starring:
Elijah Wood, Viggo Mortensen
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 2 hours 51 minutes
Starring Elijah Wood, Viggo Mortensen, Sean Astin, Cate Blanchett, Sean Bean, Billy Boyd, Ian Holm, Orlando Bloom, Ian McKellen
Director Peter Jackson
Genres Fantasy
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 6 August 2002
Main languages English
Subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 2 hours 51 minutes
Starring Elijah Wood, Viggo Mortensen, Sean Astin, Cate Blanchett, Sean Bean, Billy Boyd, Ian Holm, Orlando Bloom, Ian McKellen
Director Peter Jackson
Genres Fantasy
Studio ENTERTAINMENT IN VIDEO
Rental release 3 December 2012
Main languages English
Hearing impaired subtitles English

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I've been waiting for a non-bloated version of the Extended Blu-ray versions to be released and finally, here they are. This and the other two films are spread over two discs, but given the quality and the size of the films it's not hard to see why, although the swap-over on The Two Towers seems a little abrupt.

The extended versions are easily recommended over the theatrical versions. Across the three films you're getting at least two hours of additional scenes which cover more of the story and fill in the gaps. Some of them are not plot critical, hence their original omission, but it's nice to have them all the same.

Can't fault the quality of the picture and sound, both were superb on my modest set up.
If you're not particularly interested in all the extras, interviews and documentaries, this is the ideal version to get.
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Format: DVD
My enjoyment of the theatrical release and my enthusiasm for a live-action epic that does at least do some justice to a book that I have loved since I was a small child could not silence a nagging voice that told me the movie adaptation, no matter how spectacular, was lacking. It did not take overlong for me to put my finger on it - the theatrical release of "Fellowship" contains precious little character development, and what there is has been spread very unevenly (like butter scraped over too much bread...). Well, I could forgive this considering that there are three movies, but the second film has much ground to regain for several of the major characters in this milieu.
I am extremely happy to report that the Special Edition DVD release has all but silenced my doubts. The additional 30 minutes or so make a world of difference to the movie, making the tale more 'human' (Dwarven, Elven, Hobbitish, if you hate to anthropomorphism). Almost all of the excised material was character development, and the result of replacing it makes this DVD release the definitive version of the movie. Peter Jackson may prefer it to be considered as an additional release of the movie, where the theatrical version and this extended cut can co-exist, but I disagree. After watching the extended version I find the theatrical release even more lacking - so much so that I can't bring myself to watch it anymore.
All of the characters receive more attention: Bilbo becomes the slightly eccentric but shrewd forever-changed-by-adventure hobbit I always imagined him to be; Frodo the young nephew who has a deep love and respect for his old Hobbit uncle, and who himself can be seen enduring the change that unsettled Bilbo for life; Sam is the plant-loving yet love-shy gardener (more Rosie Cotton!
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Format: DVD
Don't get me wrong, I loved the Fellowship of the Ring when I saw it at the cinema but I could recognise that there were some flaws there too. However, with this extended version all these flaws have been rectified and the movie is a lot stronger for it.
First the major one - Lothlorien. In the cinema, like a lot of people, I came out mumbling about the wasted opportunity of presenting Lothlorien in a film. I felt that it was rushed, squeezed in as though Jackson didn't really like that part of the book and wanted to get past it as quickly as possible. Not so here - the sequence is extended greatly and to the benefit of the whole film which now feels more balanced because of it. You aren't left wondering why they bothered getting an actress of the quality of Cate Blanchett for a role which in the theatrical release was a relatively minor one - as he performance in the extended scenes truly justifies her presence. Fans of the book will be particularly delighted with the inclusion of the gift-giving and the excellent comedy moment provided by the way-bread.
The extended Shire sequences are also a joy and are well worth the inclusion (if only for the fact that not only do you get to see more of the wondrous set that Weta created but you also we get a scene inside the Green Dragon complete with Gaffer!). But where this version of the movie comes into its own is in the extra space it gives the characters in the Fellowship time to develop. Gimli particularly benefits from this (his character becoming far more rounded and three-dimensional) as do Pippin and Merry.
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Format: DVD
There’s only one way to start this review – if you’re a Lord of the Rings fan then buy the extended edition of Fellowship of the Ring. What you get is an extended version of the film, which is 30 minutes longer than the theatrical version, with 4 additional audio commentaries by cast and crew members. Then there’s the small matter of 2 discs full of extras including lots of different documentaries.
Is the extended version of the film an improvement? Yes! The extra footage varies from a split second shot to extra lines in a scene and even to complete scenes. The extra footage does add a lot to the film, which is a relief because I was a bit afraid that pointless scenes would be added in. This thankfully is not the case.
Of the added shots and scenes, it is apparent why they had been edited out of the theatrical version of the film. They are maybe slow the story down too much or simply don’t fit in too well. But there are some scenes that should definitely have been included in the original version. Two scenes immediately spring to mind.
The first is the extended council of Elrond scene. Boromir voices his opinion more, which cause more tension within the council. Then there’s the best moment to be added in, Gandalf speaking in the Black Tongue. It simply comes out of nowhere basically; suddenly he’s speaking in this language, which sounds so dark and almost scary.
The second scene is the gift giving at Lothlorien. It’s a well-known fact that Peter Jackson really wanted this scene included in the theatrical version of the film and now we get to see it. It follows very closely to the book, but changes are included. The scene is beautifully shot and perfectly shows the atmosphere of Lothlorien.
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