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Lord Jim by [Conrad, Joseph]
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Lord Jim Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 56 customer reviews

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Length: 258 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Professor Watts's assiduity and thoroughness make this edition of Lord Jim a delight. The edition is meticulous and informed in its comments on the novel, scrupulously but unobtrusively annotated, and offers a judicious selection of supporting material. In short, this edition of the novel sets the standard for its successors to follow."--Allan Simmons, General Editor of The Conradian

"One always learns from Cedric Watts. True to form, he provides a reliable text, cogent annotations, and a stimulating, eminently readable introduction to this enigmatic novel. Better still, the selections illustrating Conrad's sources, his reception by contemporaries, and the historical context of his ambivalence about colonialism are rich yet frequently unfamiliar. Is there room for yet another Lord Jim? In the case of Broadview's excellent new edition, the answer is emphatically yes."--Laurence Davies

Comments:

“One always learns from Cedric Watts. True to form, he provides a reliable text, cogent annotations, and a stimulating, eminently readable introduction to this enigmatic novel. Better still, the selections illustrating Conrad’s sources, his reception by contemporaries, and the historical context of his ambivalence about colonialism are rich yet frequently unfamiliar. Is there room for yet another Lord Jim? In the case of Broadview’s excellent new edition, the answer is emphatically yes.” — Laurence Davies, Dartmouth College

“Professor Watts’s assiduity and thoroughness make this edition of Lord Jim a delight. The edition is meticulous and informed in its comments on the novel, scrupulously but unobtrusively annotated, and offers a judicious selection of supporting material. In short, this edition of the novel sets the standard for its successors to follow.” — Allan Simmons, General Editor of The Conradian

“One always learns from Cedric Watts. True to form, he provides a reliable text, cogent annotations, and a stimulating, eminently readable introduction to this enigmatic novel. Better still, the selections illustrating Conrad’s sources, his reception by contemporaries, and the historical context of his ambivalence about colonialism are rich yet frequently unfamiliar. Is there room for yet another Lord Jim? In the case of Broadview’s excellent new edition, the answer is emphatically yes.” — Laurence Davies, Dartmouth College

“Professor Watts’s assiduity and thoroughness make this edition of Lord Jim a delight. The edition is meticulous and informed in its comments on the novel, scrupulously but unobtrusively annotated, and offers a judicious selection of supporting material. In short, this edition of the novel sets the standard for its successors to follow.” — Allan Simmons, General Editor of The Conradian

"One always learns from Cedric Watts. True to form, he provides a reliable text, cogent annotations, and a stimulating, eminently readable introduction to this enigmatic novel. Better still, the selections illustrating Conrad's sources, his reception by contemporaries, and the historical context of his ambivalence about colonialism are rich yet frequently unfamiliar. Is there room for yet another Lord Jim? In the case of Broadview's excellent new edition, the answer is emphatically yes." -- Laurence Davies, Dartmouth College

"Professor Watts's assiduity and thoroughness make this edition of Lord Jim a delight. The edition is meticulous and informed in its comments on the novel, scrupulously but unobtrusively annotated, and offers a judicious selection of supporting material. In short, this edition of the novel sets the standard for its successors to follow." -- Allan Simmons, General Editor of The Conradian

From the Publisher

The Broadview Editions series is an effort to represent the ever-changing canon of literature in English by bringing together texts long regarded as classics with valuable, lesser-known literature. Newly type-set and produced on high-quality paper in trade paperback format, the Broadview Editions series is a delight to handle as well as to read.

Each volume includes a full introduction, chronology, bibliography, and explanatory notes along with a variety of documents from the period, giving readers a rich sense of the world from which the work emerged.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 849 KB
  • Print Length: 258 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0084753UI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 56 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,545 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
I was given this book as a teenager, and made half-hearted efforts to read in over the past twenty years but rarely got beyond the first couple of pages. I had decided on very little basis that I didn't like Conrad, that his writing was uncomfortable, old-fashioned and read like another language translated into english.

I have entirely changed my mind. Older, not neccesarily wiser, but more exposed to the world and its vageries I have fallen utterly in love with Conrad and his writing which is engaging and modern. He is the most humane of writers, capable of being moving without lapsing into sentimentality, and maps the human spirit with all its pride, nobilty, hope, optimism, youth, experience, realism, and evil. Lord Jim combines all these with the excitement of an adventure story and prose that is beautifully written. As I rush headlong towards middle-age I can see much of my past, and my changing attitudes, in the tale of Jim.

I can understand people that don't like Conrad, having been one of them myself: that has changed completely, and he is now undoubtedly my favourite author. Maybe it's akin to liking olives, or cigars, or whisky, a passion that comes with age - but it's been worth the wait.
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For me, the key to this book is that Jim is the son of a clegyman who also happens to be a strict father whom Jim feels he has somehow got to please. As a son, he carries moral obligations, which have been instilled in childhood, into the world and away from the secure peace of the rectory home. He is a young man of high self-imposed standards. Proud, perhaps. But he has never been taught about weakness, failure or forgivenes. When he fails by jumping ship on that fateful night, he descends into the self-condemnation of a man who feels, bearing down upon him, not only the displeasure of his father, but also of God. All this is subconcious and that, of course, is the genius of Conrad. Jim is human but he hasn't been fully taught about the human condition (weakness and failure, and the antidote Forgiveness), despite his father's profession. So his shame is unbearable. Nothing anyone says or does will take the burden from him. He knows the moral obligation, he knows his duty; but he has not ever known forgiveness or, more accurately, self-forgiveness or God's forgiveness. He is the product of a one-sided religion; a religion of moral obligation but one without the love that makes it complete. Although the world Jim inhabits is ready to forgive, forget and move on, Jim cannot do so and attempts to escape his torment (and, who knows, seek inner peace?) by trying always to sail away from his pain. But he can't because the problem, the pain, travels with him. He becomes a good man through his attempt to find escape and restitution in Work. He is sought by employers whose trade blooms under Jim's direction. But the demon is ever there. Whenever he is confronted by his failure on that awful night he withdraws and moves on. Finally, he can run no more.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
There is no doubt that Conrad is one of the master writers of the previous century, however I tend to find him rather a chore to read. Not that reading is supposed to be "easy" of course, but that's just by way of a warning. In this novel, he not only embarks on epic page-long sentences, but engages in a whole range of innovative (for the time) techniques for telling the tragic tale of Tuan/Lord Jim. These techniques include abrupt shifts and jumps in time, and a great deal story within a story constructions. The bulk of the story is recounted by a seaman named Marlow (who also was narrator for Heart of Darkness), who is often retelling what he heard from another source, or even third-hand. Some may find this a little confusing at first, but it shouldn't be a surprising device for the modern reader. Technique aside, this is an exceedingly dense work, rich in lengthy descriptions, and requiring the reader's utmost attention.
Jim is a well-bred young Englishman who takes to the sea, envisioning a series of adventures in which he will prove his mettle and emerge as a well-regarded man. Alas, when a ship carrying a load of Malay pilgrims to Mecca strikes something and seems destined to sink, and his senior officers all abandon ship without rousing the passengers, he experiences fear and abandons ship as well. But when the ship doesn't sink, Jim is the only crewman to step forward and present himself to the maritime court of inquiry, which strips him of his sailing papers. Thereafter, Jim knocks around the South Seas, working as a water clerk in various ports, and departing whenever someone recognizes him. Finally, the narrator Marlow arranges for Jim to be installed as manager of a remote Malaysian trading post. There, he becomes the ruler and protector of the native people.
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Format: Paperback
I was familiar with Conrad's style after reading "Heart of Darkness" and few of his short stories. His descriptive, slightly long-winded style mightn't be to everybody's taste. It seems that, as a non-native English speaker, Conrad was showing off his impressive command of the language of Shakespeare and Dickens. I found I enjoyed "Heart of Darkness" more when I read it the second time.

Lord Jim is one of his most famous works and is also written is this style. It is a lot longer than "Heart of Darkness" so I approached reading it with a bit of trepidation. Sure enough I found the book dragging at times.

The story is simple enough but worth telling. Jim becomes a seafarer as a youngster and dreams of glory and adventures. However, when the ship that he is mate on runs aground he joins the rest of the white crewmembers in abandoning the passengers (pilgrims going to Mecca) to their fate.
Immediately he realises he has done wrong but sees what he did as being atypical of his character. He is determined to prove to himself and the world that he is not a coward. No longer able to work on ships he gets a job in a remote outpost where fate decides that he will have the safety of the natives in his hands during a crisis. Jim's character is quite interesting and the reader has some sympathy for him, given the youthful enthusiasm he shows in abundance and the abject remorse he feels for the mistake he has done.
Conrad had an exciting seafaring career and there is no doubt that his descriptions of places and people have an air of authenticity to them.
The build up to the running aground and the climax of the story are told at a decent pace that has the reader anxious to see what happens next. However I found that the middle part of the book dragged a lot.
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