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Look At Me by [Brookner, Anita]
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Look At Me Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Length: 189 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product description

Review

How can anything be so funny and so sad both at once? Every sentence is an object lesson in compression and wit. (Tessa Hadley on 'A Start in Life' Guardian Summer Reads, 2015)

Bewitching. (The Times)

Clever and engrossing. (David Lodge, Sunday Times)

Flawless. (Observer, Books of the Year)

Witty, intelligent and tirelessly perceptive. (Evening Standard)

About the Author

Anita Brookner was born in London and, apart from several years in Paris, has lived there ever since. She trained as an art historian and taught at the Courtauld Institute of Art until 1988.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1667 KB
  • Print Length: 189 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin; New edition edition (5 Nov. 2015)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B015S5GL0E
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #89,267 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Susannah B TOP 100 REVIEWER on 25 Nov. 2016
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Frances Hinton - who, she tells us, does not like to be called Fanny - is a quiet and unassuming young woman who works in a medical library dedicated to the study of problems of human behaviour. In charge of pictorial material, Frances works with her friend, Olivia, sending off for photographs to museums and galleries - work, she tells the reader, which is extremely interesting, in a hopeless sort of way. Part of Frances's job entails her looking after visitors who come to the library to consult the archives - two of whom are Mrs Halloran: "a wild-looking lady with a misleading air of authority who claims to be in touch with the other side" and Dr Simek, an extremely reticent Czech (or perhaps, Pole) who is working on the treatment of melancholia - both of whom visit the library every day - largely, Frances suspects, because they are lonely and because the library is so well heated. Into the library one day arrives Dr Nick Fraser with his striking wife, Alix, who seems to take a liking to Frances and invites her to supper. Frances, whose parents are no longer alive, leads a financially comfortable, but rather solitary life and is delighted to be taken up by the Frasers, whose slightly bohemian lifestyle is fascinating to the inexperienced young woman. And when Nick's colleague, the distinguished James Anstey, is introduced to Frances and appears to show an interest her, she begins to feel that a new and more exciting life might just be within her reach. However, her tentative plans for the future look as if they are in jeopardy when the sparkling but self-centred Alix draws James ever more closely into her orbit, and suddenly Frances finds herself quite out of her depth, both socially and romantically.Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very happy with purchase
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
great
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A quiet book that instils the reader to the world of social networks, friendship and being on one's own
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Format: Paperback
Well, I admit that after a great first paragraph, with the brilliant first sentence `once a thing is known, it can never be unknown', I was actually seriously worried that I was going to loathe `Look At Me' from its first three or so pages. The term wading through treacle springs to mind, endless paragraphs on depression, melancholy, death and lunacy. It wasn't looking good. Thank heavens then that I decided I would give it a first chapter then, because in a single page I was rewarded by some of the types of prose and characters that I have experienced and loved in Brookner's work before.

So what is the subject of `Look At Me'? It is interesting that the initial part of the book that bored me with the descriptions of depression and melancholy are in a way what this book is about. In fact I think the best way to describe, our narrator, Frances Hinton's life is a solitary one, and one that Brookner can do so well. Frances admits that her life is one lived very much alone, where she lives is `for old people', and really for the main the most interaction she has is with her colleagues and that's how she befriends Nick and his beautiful wife Alix and then becomes adopted as their `pet project'.

That's all I am going to give you in terms of plot because really with a slim volume of 192 pages, if I said too much I would give everything away and you wouldn't then be put through the emotional (both high and low) wringer that Brookner has in store for you and that would very much be to the detriment of `Look At Me'. It's a book you need to read in order to actually experience it.

I don't know if that's enough to satisfy you and ponder giving it a read but I do advise that you do.
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