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The Lonely Leader: Monty, 1944-1945 Paperback – 21 Aug 2009

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Pan (21 Aug. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330510010
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330510011
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.3 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,425,516 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

General Montgomery lead the 8th Army to victory at El Alamein in 1942, and as Chief of Land Forces in the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944 he received Germany's surrender in 1945. Concentrating on the momentous events of Operation Overlord from June 1944, The Lonely Leader follws Monty's leadership of the Allied offensive to Luneburg Heath the following May. Monty is a figure renowned for his military professionalism, but Alistair Horne, in association with montgomery's only son, also look at the human face of a man regarded as rather Cromwellian, considering his style of command in the context of the tactics and politics of the period, not least his controversial dealings with Eisenhower. This is a compelling account of the public and private influences of a remarkable military leader.

About the Author

Born in London in 1925, Sir Alistair Horne served in the R.C.A.F and the Coldstream Guards during World War II. He spent three years as correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, and is the author of many highly regarded books including A Savage War of Peace and The Seven Ages of Paris.

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

By Ned Middleton HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 21 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
After his famous victory over Rommel at El Alamein in 1942, Montgomery was appointed Chief of Land Forces for the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944. The Supreme Allied Commander was General Eisenhower. This book traces that final campaign from it's beginnings in London (January 1944), across the English Channel (June 1944) and the long march north eastwards across France, Belgium and Holland to the climax at Lüneberg Heath in May 1945 where Montgomery received Germany's surrender.

Working in conjunction with Montgomery's only son David, author Alistair Horne brings a fresh approach to what was, for many people, the longest year of all time as the allied forces fought battle after battle on their way to bringing the War in Europe to an end.

David Montgomery's contribution is, as one might expect, the personal side and private papers of his father in a bid to provide the reader with a human face behind the fiercely professional leader of men. Both tactics and politics come into play when the co-authors attempt to discuss Montgomery's personal dealings with his immediate superior - General Eisenhower.

Whilst it is, perhaps, only natural for British readers of this book to side with Montgomery and American readers to favour Eisenhower, my own view is that Montgomery's greatest fault was his inability to accept not being in overall command during this final phase of the War. That, in itself, is a supreme failing in any officer because, at the end of the day, be they a lieutenant or a General - they are all appointed to serve.

It is good to see this vital year from World War Two under the microscope and I am quite certain that avid historians will learn something new.

NM
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Format: Paperback
This is an interesting book about an extraordinary man. I thought the technicalities about the battles got a bit bogged down in excessive detail at times, but the insights into the character of Montgomery were fascinating. I'd certainly recommend this to students of World War 11.
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Format: Paperback
This is a little outdated in its coverage of Monty and feels and reads old.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8997ac48) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x89985048) out of 5 stars Only a year - but what a year! 7 Jan. 2014
By Ned Middleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
After his famous victory over Rommel at El Alamein in 1942, Montgomery was appointed Chief of Land Forces for the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944. The Supreme Allied Commander was General Eisenhower. This book traces that final campaign from it’s beginnings in London (January 1944), across the English Channel (June 1944) and the long march north eastwards across France, Belgium and Holland to the climax at Lüneberg Heath in May 1945 where Montgomery received Germany’s surrender.

Working in conjunction with Montgomery’s only son David, author Alistair Horne brings a fresh approach to what was, for many people, the longest year of all time as the allied forces fought battle after battle on their way to bringing the War in Europe to an end.

David Montgomery’s contribution is, as one might expect, the personal side and private papers of his father in a bid to provide the reader with a human face behind the fiercely professional leader of men. Both tactics and politics come into play when the co-authors attempt to discuss Montgomery’s personal dealings with his immediate superior - General Eisenhower.

Whilst it is, perhaps, only natural for British readers of this book to side with Montgomery and American readers to favour Eisenhower, my own view is that Montgomery’s greatest fault was his inability to accept not being in overall command during this final phase of the War. That, in itself, is a supreme failing in any officer because, at the end of the day, be they a lieutenant or a General - they are all appointed to serve.

It is good to see this vital year from World War Two under the microscope and I am quite certain that avid historians will learn something new.

NM
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8987e9fc) out of 5 stars Only a year - but what a year! 9 Nov. 2012
By Ned Middleton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
After his famous victory over Rommel at El Alamein in 1942, Montgomery was appointed Chief of Land Forces for the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944. The Supreme Allied Commander was General Eisenhower. This book traces that final campaign from it's beginnings in London (January 1944), across the English Channel (June 1944) and the long march north eastwards across France, Belgium and Holland to the climax at Lüneberg Heath in May 1945 where Montgomery received Germany's surrender.

Working in conjunction with Montgomery's only son David, author Alistair Horne brings a fresh approach to what was, for many people, the longest year of all time as the allied forces fought battle after battle on their way to bringing the War in Europe to an end.

David Montgomery's contribution is, as one might expect, the personal side and private papers of his father in a bid to provide the reader with a human face behind the fiercely professional leader of men. Both tactics and politics come into play when the co-authors attempt to discuss Montgomery's personal dealings with his immediate superior - General Eisenhower.

Whilst it is, perhaps, only natural for British readers of this book to side with Montgomery and American readers to favour Eisenhower, my own view is that Montgomery's greatest fault was his inability to accept not being in overall command during this final phase of the War. That, in itself, is a supreme failing in any officer because, at the end of the day, be they a lieutenant or a General - they are all appointed to serve.

It is good to see this vital year from World War Two under the microscope and I am quite certain that avid historians will learn something new.

NM
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