Lolo


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Biography

Meet LoLo. The 25-year-old Tennessee-born, Brooklyn-rooted singer is a name – and a voice – that you will soon get to know very well.
With the magnificent Weapon For Saturday, her tough, beats-heavy album, this major talent bursts out of the speakers, brimming with energy and attitude, showcasing her astoundingly gutsy and soulful voice. There are distinct echoes here, from Aretha to Alicia, but LoLo is very much her own woman. Weapon For Saturday is an altogether ballsy, unapologetic and self-empowered proposition. Recorded in Los Angeles and produced by Mark Batson (Dr. Dre/Eminem), this ... Read more

Meet LoLo. The 25-year-old Tennessee-born, Brooklyn-rooted singer is a name – and a voice – that you will soon get to know very well.
With the magnificent Weapon For Saturday, her tough, beats-heavy album, this major talent bursts out of the speakers, brimming with energy and attitude, showcasing her astoundingly gutsy and soulful voice. There are distinct echoes here, from Aretha to Alicia, but LoLo is very much her own woman. Weapon For Saturday is an altogether ballsy, unapologetic and self-empowered proposition. Recorded in Los Angeles and produced by Mark Batson (Dr. Dre/Eminem), this is utterly thrilling music that dares you to ignore it.
The rolling-grooved, playfully bragging title track finds the singer casting herself as the “hottest bitch in the biker flick” and, more abstractly, “the baddest car in the parking lot”, before imagining herself as a she-warrior on the battlefield with her sword and shield, boldly warning, “I won’t go down without a fight”.
“In a lot of ways, I wanted this to be a powerful record,” says LoLo. “You’re like, Look at me! I feel like a strong person and I’m fucking after it. It’s definitely, I’m here and you will all notice.”
This streak of determination and defiance runs all the way through Weapon For Saturday. Heard It From A Friend finds LoLo slamming a cheating boyfriend (“When you gonna tell me you fucked me over?”), Praying For Daylight sees her on the run from a murder for which she may or may not have been responsible, while in One Night Ticket To Paradise, with its sampled live audience claps and roars, she comes over as a devilish temptress offering an experience that is “better than Marilyn, better than Heidi Fleiss”.
“In that song,” LoLo laughs, “I’m saying, I’ll take you away to the land of beyond. I want people to use their own imagination with the songs. And you know what? If they dream me up being a stripper, that’s fine. And if they dream me up being a killer, that’s fine by me too. I wanted to have a lot of fun.” Other key collaborators on Weapon For Saturday include one-man string section Rob Moose (Bon Iver/Antony & The Johnsons) and, on the swaggering Hate U 2, co-writer Justin Parker, whose recent credits include Lana Del Rey’s Video Games, Bat For Lashes’ Laura and Rihanna’s Stay. Hate U 2 was written in the studio on the day that Lolo received a phone call.
“All I can say is thank God that somebody called me with that news, ‘cause if they hadn’t, that song wouldn’t exist,” she says. “Sometimes bad news can turn into really good news. There is always going be someone in the world giving you grief. Talking shit about you behind your back, talking shit about you to the world in front of your face, and you can’t stop them. I think it’s best to come to the agreement, in these situations, that you both hate each other, because that’s the simple truth. There’s no need to pretend to be nice when you fucking hate each other.”
Elsewhere, there’s the balladeering, almost Tom Waits-y old time show tune “Sunday Morning (Turn Down The Sun)”, written in LA with Batson in the cold light of day after an almighty party. “It was our drunken lullaby to ourselves,” says the singer. “It’s a total hangover song.”
The journey to this point for LoLo has been a long and sometimes difficult one. At the age of fifteen, having endlessly pestered her parents about her desire to become a recording artist and songwriter, she moved with her mother to Los Angeles. “I was writing every day non-stop,” she says. “Just to show them that I was dedicated. It was a huge risk.”
When her mother was forced to return to Jackson, Tennessee, the young singer stayed on in LA, having been invited to move in with her close friend, actress/model Riley Keough. Relocating to New York, at 18, LoLo landed a role in Broadway musical Spring Awakening, originating the rebel character of Ilse. “I had to play this bohemian chick that ran away,” she laughs. “I was like, well, that’s pretty true to life.”
In 2010, using her given name Lauren Pritchard, she released Wasted In Jackson, a stunning album of southern soul and heartbreak. Now she returns in 2013, issuing Weapon For Saturday under the nickname she’s had since the age of fifteen.
“LoLo is what people have called me for years and years so it just felt like the right thing to do.”
Following the critical success and baffling commercial disappointment of that album, not to mention her two years of touring in support of the record, LoLo was philosophical about the experience, and more importantly, entirely undaunted. “I’m so proud of my first record, I wouldn’t change a single note or word. I’m thankful for that record and everything that happened. Because I never would have been able to get from point A to point B.”
Wasted In Jackson was an emotionally raw album, written in the painful aftermath of the break-up of a three-year relationship, that reflected where the young singer was at that point in her life. It’s testament to LoLo’s irrepressible spirit that she survived all of this with her creative instincts intact. She has naturally evolved, emerging stronger and ever more determined.
Now, with the utterly assured, future hits-heavy Weapon For Saturday, a bolder, more forceful, sonically and emotionally powerful record, she is ready to step into the spotlight. “What I definitely want people to get from this record is not just that I am strong, but that music makes us strong,” LoLo says. “The record has a real sense of power and powerful creativity. What I learned about myself making the record is that you can’t be afraid. There’s no reason to be afraid.”
Once again, ladies and gentlemen, meet LoLo. She’s a force of nature. One that is set to blow you away.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Meet LoLo. The 25-year-old Tennessee-born, Brooklyn-rooted singer is a name – and a voice – that you will soon get to know very well.
With the magnificent Weapon For Saturday, her tough, beats-heavy album, this major talent bursts out of the speakers, brimming with energy and attitude, showcasing her astoundingly gutsy and soulful voice. There are distinct echoes here, from Aretha to Alicia, but LoLo is very much her own woman. Weapon For Saturday is an altogether ballsy, unapologetic and self-empowered proposition. Recorded in Los Angeles and produced by Mark Batson (Dr. Dre/Eminem), this is utterly thrilling music that dares you to ignore it.
The rolling-grooved, playfully bragging title track finds the singer casting herself as the “hottest bitch in the biker flick” and, more abstractly, “the baddest car in the parking lot”, before imagining herself as a she-warrior on the battlefield with her sword and shield, boldly warning, “I won’t go down without a fight”.
“In a lot of ways, I wanted this to be a powerful record,” says LoLo. “You’re like, Look at me! I feel like a strong person and I’m fucking after it. It’s definitely, I’m here and you will all notice.”
This streak of determination and defiance runs all the way through Weapon For Saturday. Heard It From A Friend finds LoLo slamming a cheating boyfriend (“When you gonna tell me you fucked me over?”), Praying For Daylight sees her on the run from a murder for which she may or may not have been responsible, while in One Night Ticket To Paradise, with its sampled live audience claps and roars, she comes over as a devilish temptress offering an experience that is “better than Marilyn, better than Heidi Fleiss”.
“In that song,” LoLo laughs, “I’m saying, I’ll take you away to the land of beyond. I want people to use their own imagination with the songs. And you know what? If they dream me up being a stripper, that’s fine. And if they dream me up being a killer, that’s fine by me too. I wanted to have a lot of fun.” Other key collaborators on Weapon For Saturday include one-man string section Rob Moose (Bon Iver/Antony & The Johnsons) and, on the swaggering Hate U 2, co-writer Justin Parker, whose recent credits include Lana Del Rey’s Video Games, Bat For Lashes’ Laura and Rihanna’s Stay. Hate U 2 was written in the studio on the day that Lolo received a phone call.
“All I can say is thank God that somebody called me with that news, ‘cause if they hadn’t, that song wouldn’t exist,” she says. “Sometimes bad news can turn into really good news. There is always going be someone in the world giving you grief. Talking shit about you behind your back, talking shit about you to the world in front of your face, and you can’t stop them. I think it’s best to come to the agreement, in these situations, that you both hate each other, because that’s the simple truth. There’s no need to pretend to be nice when you fucking hate each other.”
Elsewhere, there’s the balladeering, almost Tom Waits-y old time show tune “Sunday Morning (Turn Down The Sun)”, written in LA with Batson in the cold light of day after an almighty party. “It was our drunken lullaby to ourselves,” says the singer. “It’s a total hangover song.”
The journey to this point for LoLo has been a long and sometimes difficult one. At the age of fifteen, having endlessly pestered her parents about her desire to become a recording artist and songwriter, she moved with her mother to Los Angeles. “I was writing every day non-stop,” she says. “Just to show them that I was dedicated. It was a huge risk.”
When her mother was forced to return to Jackson, Tennessee, the young singer stayed on in LA, having been invited to move in with her close friend, actress/model Riley Keough. Relocating to New York, at 18, LoLo landed a role in Broadway musical Spring Awakening, originating the rebel character of Ilse. “I had to play this bohemian chick that ran away,” she laughs. “I was like, well, that’s pretty true to life.”
In 2010, using her given name Lauren Pritchard, she released Wasted In Jackson, a stunning album of southern soul and heartbreak. Now she returns in 2013, issuing Weapon For Saturday under the nickname she’s had since the age of fifteen.
“LoLo is what people have called me for years and years so it just felt like the right thing to do.”
Following the critical success and baffling commercial disappointment of that album, not to mention her two years of touring in support of the record, LoLo was philosophical about the experience, and more importantly, entirely undaunted. “I’m so proud of my first record, I wouldn’t change a single note or word. I’m thankful for that record and everything that happened. Because I never would have been able to get from point A to point B.”
Wasted In Jackson was an emotionally raw album, written in the painful aftermath of the break-up of a three-year relationship, that reflected where the young singer was at that point in her life. It’s testament to LoLo’s irrepressible spirit that she survived all of this with her creative instincts intact. She has naturally evolved, emerging stronger and ever more determined.
Now, with the utterly assured, future hits-heavy Weapon For Saturday, a bolder, more forceful, sonically and emotionally powerful record, she is ready to step into the spotlight. “What I definitely want people to get from this record is not just that I am strong, but that music makes us strong,” LoLo says. “The record has a real sense of power and powerful creativity. What I learned about myself making the record is that you can’t be afraid. There’s no reason to be afraid.”
Once again, ladies and gentlemen, meet LoLo. She’s a force of nature. One that is set to blow you away.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Meet LoLo. The 25-year-old Tennessee-born, Brooklyn-rooted singer is a name – and a voice – that you will soon get to know very well.
With the magnificent Weapon For Saturday, her tough, beats-heavy album, this major talent bursts out of the speakers, brimming with energy and attitude, showcasing her astoundingly gutsy and soulful voice. There are distinct echoes here, from Aretha to Alicia, but LoLo is very much her own woman. Weapon For Saturday is an altogether ballsy, unapologetic and self-empowered proposition. Recorded in Los Angeles and produced by Mark Batson (Dr. Dre/Eminem), this is utterly thrilling music that dares you to ignore it.
The rolling-grooved, playfully bragging title track finds the singer casting herself as the “hottest bitch in the biker flick” and, more abstractly, “the baddest car in the parking lot”, before imagining herself as a she-warrior on the battlefield with her sword and shield, boldly warning, “I won’t go down without a fight”.
“In a lot of ways, I wanted this to be a powerful record,” says LoLo. “You’re like, Look at me! I feel like a strong person and I’m fucking after it. It’s definitely, I’m here and you will all notice.”
This streak of determination and defiance runs all the way through Weapon For Saturday. Heard It From A Friend finds LoLo slamming a cheating boyfriend (“When you gonna tell me you fucked me over?”), Praying For Daylight sees her on the run from a murder for which she may or may not have been responsible, while in One Night Ticket To Paradise, with its sampled live audience claps and roars, she comes over as a devilish temptress offering an experience that is “better than Marilyn, better than Heidi Fleiss”.
“In that song,” LoLo laughs, “I’m saying, I’ll take you away to the land of beyond. I want people to use their own imagination with the songs. And you know what? If they dream me up being a stripper, that’s fine. And if they dream me up being a killer, that’s fine by me too. I wanted to have a lot of fun.” Other key collaborators on Weapon For Saturday include one-man string section Rob Moose (Bon Iver/Antony & The Johnsons) and, on the swaggering Hate U 2, co-writer Justin Parker, whose recent credits include Lana Del Rey’s Video Games, Bat For Lashes’ Laura and Rihanna’s Stay. Hate U 2 was written in the studio on the day that Lolo received a phone call.
“All I can say is thank God that somebody called me with that news, ‘cause if they hadn’t, that song wouldn’t exist,” she says. “Sometimes bad news can turn into really good news. There is always going be someone in the world giving you grief. Talking shit about you behind your back, talking shit about you to the world in front of your face, and you can’t stop them. I think it’s best to come to the agreement, in these situations, that you both hate each other, because that’s the simple truth. There’s no need to pretend to be nice when you fucking hate each other.”
Elsewhere, there’s the balladeering, almost Tom Waits-y old time show tune “Sunday Morning (Turn Down The Sun)”, written in LA with Batson in the cold light of day after an almighty party. “It was our drunken lullaby to ourselves,” says the singer. “It’s a total hangover song.”
The journey to this point for LoLo has been a long and sometimes difficult one. At the age of fifteen, having endlessly pestered her parents about her desire to become a recording artist and songwriter, she moved with her mother to Los Angeles. “I was writing every day non-stop,” she says. “Just to show them that I was dedicated. It was a huge risk.”
When her mother was forced to return to Jackson, Tennessee, the young singer stayed on in LA, having been invited to move in with her close friend, actress/model Riley Keough. Relocating to New York, at 18, LoLo landed a role in Broadway musical Spring Awakening, originating the rebel character of Ilse. “I had to play this bohemian chick that ran away,” she laughs. “I was like, well, that’s pretty true to life.”
In 2010, using her given name Lauren Pritchard, she released Wasted In Jackson, a stunning album of southern soul and heartbreak. Now she returns in 2013, issuing Weapon For Saturday under the nickname she’s had since the age of fifteen.
“LoLo is what people have called me for years and years so it just felt like the right thing to do.”
Following the critical success and baffling commercial disappointment of that album, not to mention her two years of touring in support of the record, LoLo was philosophical about the experience, and more importantly, entirely undaunted. “I’m so proud of my first record, I wouldn’t change a single note or word. I’m thankful for that record and everything that happened. Because I never would have been able to get from point A to point B.”
Wasted In Jackson was an emotionally raw album, written in the painful aftermath of the break-up of a three-year relationship, that reflected where the young singer was at that point in her life. It’s testament to LoLo’s irrepressible spirit that she survived all of this with her creative instincts intact. She has naturally evolved, emerging stronger and ever more determined.
Now, with the utterly assured, future hits-heavy Weapon For Saturday, a bolder, more forceful, sonically and emotionally powerful record, she is ready to step into the spotlight. “What I definitely want people to get from this record is not just that I am strong, but that music makes us strong,” LoLo says. “The record has a real sense of power and powerful creativity. What I learned about myself making the record is that you can’t be afraid. There’s no reason to be afraid.”
Once again, ladies and gentlemen, meet LoLo. She’s a force of nature. One that is set to blow you away.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.