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The Little Wonder: The Remarkable History of Wisden by [Winder, Robert]
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The Little Wonder: The Remarkable History of Wisden Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Length: 464 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

A fascinating and tremendously well-researched history. The Times As with Marmite, salad cream and the University Boat Race, the obsessive appeal of Wisden to a certain type of Englishman (and it is usually a man) can be hard to explain to the uninitiated. The search for the source of the book's magic is the subtext of this witty, erudite and comprehensive history. -- Paul Coupar The Cricketer Thoroughly researched and highly entertaining. The Times Brilliant -- David Kynaston The Times Irresistible...Winder's graceful and measured prose is entirely suited to his topic. The Guardian excellent celebratory title[]. ...contains some of the best writing you will encounter...in any genre. The Times Marking Wisden's 150th anniversary with detailed research, elegant style and dry wit. New Statesman

About the Author

Robert Winder was Literary Editor of the Independent and Deputy Editor of Granta. He is the author of several books including Hell for Leather: A Modern Cricket Journey and Bloody Foreigners: The Story of Immigration to Britain, and a team member of the Gaieties Cricket Club, whose chairman was the late Harold Pinter.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 8112 KB
  • Print Length: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Wisden; 1 edition (11 April 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00C9A8PT2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #535,886 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent history of Wisden with strong context to its inception and how it became an establishment icon. First World War particularly poignant
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Format: Kindle Edition
Wisden is a name synonymous with cricket, and this book charts the history of the annual Wisden Cricketers’ Almanacs. It starts at the beginning, with the career of John Wisden, the man who first published it, and moves right through the decades to the contemporary situation, where Wisden has to compete with the internet and redefine its role. I found the early chapters particularly interesting, but like the Wisden Almanacs themselves, every reader will have a favourite section.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this book for a cricket fanatic as a birthday present. The book is full of interesting facts about the Wisden Almanach!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a history of the first 150 years of Wisden this book is factually interesting but it is written in a style that makes it like watching a Geoffrey Boycott innings-hard going.The book itself is in the form of past Wisdens with very few illustrations which makes it a collectors item rather than a good read.I cannot help thinking that had Bloomsbury produced a glossy covered paperback at a more appealing price they could have sold a lot more copies.Nevertheless as a cricket lover it will take a prominent place on my bookshelves to dip into now and again especially during the depths of a winter evening.
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Format: Paperback
It's interesting that four of the seven reviews already here are written by people who gave the book as a present. Perhaps those who received it share my frustrations with it. The book is clearly the product of enormous research and is full of interesting information and interesting sections, but overall I thought it missed its mark as a history of Wisden and also found it a real hard slog to reach the end.

At 400 pages it feels very flabby. The author has a habit of writing twenty words where ten would do, and tends not to draw the boundaries of his story sufficiently tightly often straying into a general account of some cricket issue or another rather than confining himself to how Wisden covered it. Perhaps a limit of 300 pages would have focused everyone's attention on how the story should be told and forced some tough decisions.

On p.315 the author confesses that his account is guilty "for storytelling reasons" of emphasising the role of Wisden's editors over the editorial support staff. I thought this was quite an admission in a book that claims to be history and wondered what other topics had the same treatment. It certainly doesn't feel like a definitive account, being unreferenced and a little shaky when it ventures beyond cricket into the general historical or publishing backgrounds, but that may not have been the intention anyway.

Above all I wish the author had resisted the temptation to sound funny or clever. It's a while since I've read a book where I was so aware of the author's voice interjecting between me and the story. The humour often feels forced and the erudition misplaced. For me at least, the reference to a Luis Borges short story (p391), a Lytton Strachey anecdote (p.349), and the "paradigms" and "dichotomies" on p.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Now we do. It's actually so much more interesting than anyone would imagine a book about to book to be.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I bought this for my husband, a great cricket fan and owner of a huge collection of Wisdens. It looks interesting to a non cricket fanatic, easy to read. A good background to the yellow peril.
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