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Ten Little Indians ( And Then There Were None )

3.9 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001L1XL3A
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 333,003 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
This is one of the best adaptations of the Christie novel, taking many then big stars of the sixties for the 'victims', including Shirley "Goldfinger" Eaton and Wilfrid Hyde-White and Stanley Holloway, both fresh from success in "My Fair Lady".

Unfortunately, this DVD is extremely poor in the picture quality department, a kind of haze lingering throughout - it appears to be down to a conversions issue and ghosting is a constant problem. A less trusting buyer might wonder whether Orbit have put out a bootleg product.

Extras are limited to a very dull list of other Orbit releases and the 'Whodunnit Break' - an extremely cheesy gimmick from the original theatrical release which purports to offer clues but simply throws up flashbacks to each murder in turn.
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Format: DVD
Much like the filmic adaptations of Agatha Christie's stunning source novel, a literary work that added the killer to serial, the Ten Little Indians rhyme has quite a few versions. I mention this because the core essence of the source, both in written rhyme and filmic celluloid, is always what shines through. The films vary in quality, though each one does bring its own ideas to the adaptation, George Pollock's 1965 version is a dandy, though not perfect by any stretch of the imagination.

The story is relocated to a remote snowy mountainside. Ten people have gathered there, either as servants or guests invited by the mysterious U.N. Owen. Once all gathered under one roof, a tape recording reveals that all the guests are guilty of despicable crimes, and thus must pay the price. Cue the now standard formula of each member of the ten getting bumped off as suspicions and panic begins to arise. With each death comes the removal of a model Indian from a circular display laid out on the lounge table.

Thus we have a serial killer whodunit (whosedoingit?) in full effect. The deaths are inventive, with some carrying genuine suspense and chills into the bargain, and although the final reveal lacks credibility, it has the requisite surprise factor to not disappoint genre fans. The beauty here is in the cast list, where for fans of British classic cinema it's a roll call of greats. Stanley Holloway, Wilfrid Hyde-White, Dennis Price (whose visual reactions here are, ahem, priceless) and Leo Genn lead the male British front, while Shirley Eaton fights the British girl's corner with sauce and sizzle. Supplementing the Brits for an overseas audience, is pop star Fabian, Hugh O'Brian and Daliah Lavi. The latter of which also raises the temperatures considerably.
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By bernie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Mar. 2006
Format: DVD
8 people are invited to a remote mountaintop chalet by their host U.N. Owen; two people are already there as the butler and cook. Once there they find that their mysterious host has accused each of murder and commences to dispatch the guests in the order of a song of Ten Little Indians. Finding that they are cut off from the outside world they must find Mr. Owen and neutralize him before they are all dispatched.
All the clues are present; can you detect whodunit and why?
Pretty well acted version of an Agatha Christie classic. Everyone remembers the standard movie version the was made “And Then There Were None” (1945) with Barry Fitzgerald. Several other attempts were made such as “And Then There Were None” (1974) with Elke Sommer and even one movie with the original book title “Ten Little Niggers” (1949) with John Bentley.
This version with Hugh O'Brian as Hugh Lombard even keeps much of the dialog and is with adding to you Agatha Christy collection. Many of the actors are popular and will be recognizable form similar plays. The Voice of 'Mr. Owen' is Christopher Lee. The only annoying part is the constant intrusion of sixties music by Malcolm Lockyer. The good part is that the most obnoxious actor gets bumped off first.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There is a round yellow label on the cover of this DVD which says, "Includes the whodunit break." Underneath these words, too small to read on the Amazon scan, it says, "See back for details." O.K. we look at the back. There, right at the top it says, "The whodunit break. Just before the gripping climax of the film you will be given sixty seconds to guess the killer's identity! The film will pause and on screen you will see clues to help you decide who the murderer is...We dare you to guess."
Further down it again says, "Includes the theatrical release Whodunit Break."
Now, from all this you'd expect the whodunit break to be included in the film itself...Well? You would, wouldn't you? - Well, it isn't, it's included as one of the extras. So we don't see the theatrical version of the film after all. If the distributors of this film do such stupid things then they deserve poor ratings...One star. Take the prisoner down.
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Format: DVD
Directed by George Pollock (who worked in this role on many early screen adaptions of classic Agatha Christie novels), 1965's 'Ten Little Indians, based on the Agatha Christie book 'And Then There Were None', is the first remake of the excellent 1945 original. Although often spoken about unfavourably in comparison to the first, I believe that this is a pretty solid adaptation, much more contemporary in it's style, and with an excellent cast.

Before I talk about the film, I have to say that the DVD is slightly disappointing. The visual quality is okay for viewing, but there has been no remastering, and as a result, all the dust and grain is kept in throughout. The main disappointment for was the 'The Whodunit Break', which is included, as clearly started on the cover. For the first time in motion picture history, just before the movie's climax, 'The Whodunit Break!' gave audiences sixty seconds to guess the indenity of the killer. We are told on the back of the DVD, 'The film will pause and on the screen you will see clues to help you decide who the murderer is'. Well, I waited, and waited, but no such thing took place. Instead, it is only included on the disc as a bonus feature, and not part of the main film at all, which did seem rather pointless to me.

As for the film, as the old story goes, ten strangers visit a mountaintop in Winter (originally a remote island in the book and first film), they all have one thing in common, and have also been gathered together by the mysterious Mr Owen. When Owen fails to arrive, the strangers have lunch together, realise that they are unable to leave, and one by one they are killed off, in the clever tradition of the old nursery rhyme 'Ten Little Indians'.
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