• RRP: £12.99
  • You Save: £3.90 (30%)
FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Little Deaths has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Little Deaths Hardcover – 12 Jan 2017

4.3 out of 5 stars 55 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£9.09
£5.77 £2.58
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Man Booker International Prize 2017
A Horse Walks Into a Bar has won the Man Booker International Prize 2017. Learn more
£9.09 FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • Little Deaths
  • +
  • Good Me Bad Me: The Sunday Times Bestseller
  • +
  • Behind Her Eyes: The new Sunday Times #1 best selling psychological thriller
Total price: £20.58
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Main Market Ed. edition (12 Jan. 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1509826572
  • ISBN-13: 978-1509826575
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.6 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 47,823 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Review

A phenomenal achievement. Little Deaths is one of those so-very-rare accomplishments: a lightning fast, heart-pounding, psychologically resonant crime novel that effortlessly transcends genre. If you believed that literary fiction can't be a one-sitting read, think again (Jeffery Deaver)

Utterly atmospheric and with style to burn, Emma Flint's Little Deaths is a novel that troubles and transfixes from its simmering first pages all the way to its searing final words (Megan Abbott)

Wrenching and real and deeply moving. I fell fast and hard under the spell of this lush, moody, film noir of a novel (Chris Bohjalian)

A stunning feat . . . Ruth Malone's descent into hell is a riveting tale of bad luck, heartbreak and prejudice, written with the pace of a thriller and the rich detail of a historical novel (Jane Casey)

A gripping read that is at the same time deeply real. A beautifully written and realized debut. I absolutely loved it. (Kate Hamer, author of The Girl In The Red Coat)

Destined to make waves this year. In the evocative Little Deaths by Emma Flint, two young children are brutally killed in New York in 1965. Is their mother guilty of murder or simply guilty of defying society's norms? (Express)

I absolutely believed in the setting: the sleaze, the corruption and the glamour. The dialogue is pitch perfect and Ruth Malone is a complex and fascinating character. This is a novel about sex, obsession and discrimination, but it’s also a thriller that keeps you guessing until the last page (Ann Cleeves)

Emma Flint’s debut is compelling and atmospheric. (Emerald Street)

Her writing is by turns gutsy, involving and vivid.The story left an overwhelmingly poignant impression on me . . . a wonderful book (?Janet Ellis, author of The Butcher's Hook?)

Involving and atmospheric and immensely gripping (Sophie Hannah)

An excellent debut . . . unsparing and convincing (The Times Book of the Month)

There’s plenty of buzz around Emma Flint’s evocative debut thriller inspired by a true crime story and filled with murder, sex and obsession during a heatwave in Sixties New York (Daily Telegraph)

Guilt, loneliness and trial by tabloid are explored in this fascinating debut . . . Steaming with the heat of a New York July, Little Deaths is redolent of 60s noir . . . where Little Deaths excels is in its portrayals of different kinds of loneliness . . . this fascinating debut suggests [Flint’s next novel] will be one to watch out for (Observer Book of the Month)

A hotly tipped debut destined to make waves this year . . . evocative (Daily Express)

As dark as any period noir and simmering with tension (Express S Magazine)

I absolutely believed the setting: the sleaze, the corruption and the glamour. The dialogue is pitch perfect and Ruth Malone is a complex and fascinating woman . . . This is a novel about sex, obsession and discrimination, but it’s also a thriller that keeps us guessing until the last page (Ann Cleeves Big Issue)

Heart-pounding feminist thriller . . . a heady and haunting read (Elle)

Flint gives the femme fatale back her soul . . . an engaging read (Literary Review)

This is one writer who is definitely going places (Crime Scene magazine)

Little Deaths convinces as a meticulously detailed period piece, a searching exploration of sexual hypocrisy and a twisty and enthralling murder mystery . . . Flint writes superbly . . . with something of the hallucinatory force of Eoin McNamee’s Blue trilogy and the dark fire of Megan Abbott’s early noirs . . . It’s an absorbing, seductive read; I absolutely loved it (Irish Times)

Accomplished . . . deftly done . . . finely observed . . . wonderfully written . . . excellent . . . gripping . . . Flint writes powerfully . . . absolutely riveting . . . a strong and confident addition to the growing trend of domestic dystopias (Guardian)

A pageturner . . . A terrifying, evocative read . . . compelling (Glamour)

Inspired by true events, this thrilling suspense story will make you question your loyalties at every turn (Harpers Bazaar)

Blowing apart stereotypes of mothers and femme fatales, Flint has marked herself out as one to watch (Stylist)

Even though Flint is British, she nails the voices with authority . . . Flint is scrupulous about centering this moody thriller in the facts, yet giving them a deeper psychological spin . . . atmospheric and plausible (Washington Post)

Book Description

It's every mother's worst nightmare. But Ruth Malone is not like other mothers . . .

See all Product description

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
On opening the book, the story captures your heart -- a woman burdened by the death of her two children, Cindy and Frank Jr, presumed guilty purely for her appearance and behaviour around the case instead of the police officers 'getting their teeth into' it and trying to find the killer. The synopsis intrigued me, and when I found out it was based around a true story, that of Alice Crimmins, my interest peaked. The first half of this book was thrilling, many turns and twists that invite you to form your own opinion on the murderer, and the many different points of view, that of her husband Frank, the mother Ruth, and Pete, a reporter for a local magazine. However, during the second half, the voices of the separate characters dwindled into one sappy voice, filled with sadness and moping. Many times I had to read sections over before I understood who was narrating, which should not be the job of the reader, but should be set out clearly by the author -- although admittedly, it is a hard job to do. Alas, the second half became monotonous, with irrelevant stories, adding to the context, but (in my opinion) used as filler to 'pad' the book out.
From the get go, the idea seems extraordinary, but the execution could have been better. There could have been more of an emphasis on the use of appearance in the prejudice of society, the role of women in 1965 New York, and general corruption of the police. Also, upon further reflection, perhaps not explicitly, but there are themes of abuse, specifically domestic, due to 'slapping' and many other situations, and this is not mentioned as wrong or right -- although it could be reflecting the view of the time, as 'don't talk about it and it didn't happen', but all of the men in the book are abusive, lingering creeps.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Interesting story and great plotline, enjoyed it very much.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not a bad read, but not brilliant either. Typical who did it plot. Didn't really get the journalist character. An easy going holiday read at best.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Good read in a whodunnit book!'
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By C. Bannister TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 April 2017
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Little Deaths is inspired by the true story of Alice Crimmins who was tried for the murder of her two young children in Queens, New York in 1965, and oh my, what a compelling story this is!

We are introduced to the mother, now Ruth Malone, who lives in an apartment in Queens whose two children Frankie and Cindy went missing from their bedroom. With little Cindy found strangled in a nearby parking lot a day later, Frankie remained missing for a further ten days, and then he too was found murdered. Despite the horrible crime as the book unfolds we see that Ruth was tried, not as much on hard evidence but because the former cocktail waitress did not behave as the public expects a bereaved mother to act.

I was instantly drawn into the tale, the world that Ruth lived in is one that is relatively easy to sympathise with. Her life hadn’t turned out as she expected, her dreams stunted by the birth of her two children and then she separated from her husband Frank. At the time the children went missing the two were locked in a custody battle with Ruth determined not to relinquish her children but at the same time nor was she going to live like a nun.  Contrary to the working class values that was Queens at that time, her neighbours disapproved of her association with a number of other men,added to which she cared about her appearance, drank and smoked. The hard truth is that Ruth wanted more from her life but did that mean she was the one who killed the children?  The countless crimes against Ruth mount throughout the book as the police, certain of her guilt, have her under almost constant surveillance so when she buys a new dress soon after Cindy’s body was found, her guilt was almost confirmed.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
LITTLE DEATHS is a hard-going, desperately sad read with a sting in the tale. A period piece, it nevertheless has many parallels with infamous child abduction and murder cases today, though the author never strays onto her soapbox. Instead the author writes lean, sharp literary prose that's brought to life so convincingly by smell and colour; I was blown away! Flint also brings forth compelling questions of culpability, misogyny and whorephobia, contrasting the poor doomed Ruth's fate against a backdrop of hostile mob justice and would-be heroism on our reporter lead's part. And that ending! I did not see it coming at all, bravo. Very much recommended.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lists of up-coming books to watch our for in 2017 have been buzzing about Little Deaths, so I was keen to see if the book lives up to the hype. It does, it is a fascinating debut.

The setting for this novel is Queens, New York in the mid 1960s. It is July, hot and sweltering, the locals are edgy. The murder of two young children, Frankie Junior and Cindy, stirs the community into a frenzy.

Ruth – mother to the two murdered children – has separated from her husband, Frank, and has been struggling to make ends meet. The two parents are in the middle of a custody battle, tempers are fraught. She also has a desperate need to be loved and nurtured, and therefore actively seeks the attentions of men to counter the deep loneliness and disconnectedness that blights her life. She is not purely a social drinker, but someone who will dribble vodka into her morning coffee to stave off the profound emptiness.

As investigations into the murder of her two young children progress, rookie reporter Pete Wonicke is drawn to the story like a moth to a light, he is enthralled by the woman who increasingly becomes the main suspect. So much so that he puts his job on the line….

In some ways this is a very prescient story for today – a woman who is seen to have loose morals is vilified by those around her, mainly by the men but sadly also by some of the women. No-one really bothers to look at the bigger picture of her life, her upbringing, and social circumstance. She is deemed “.. the very picture of a scandalous woman“. As the case against her builds, Pete becomes more and more convinced of her innocence. Whilst all the focus is on her – her lifestyle, her alcohol consumption, her natty and revealing dress style, is the real perpetrator of these crimes being overlooked?
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews