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Linux in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference by [Siever, Ellen, Figgins, Stephen, Love, Robert, Robbins, Arnold]
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Linux in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference 6th , Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product description

About the Author

Ellen Siever is a writer and editor specializing in Linux and other open source topics. In addition to Linux in a Nutshell, she coauthored Perl in a Nutshell. She is a long-time Linux and Unix user, and was a programmer for many years until she decided that writing about computers was more fun.

Stephen Figgins honed many of his computer skills while working as O'Reilly's book answer guy. A life long learner with many interests, Stephen draws on many resources to make difficult topics understandable and accessible.

Now living in Lawrence, Kansas, he administrates Linux servers for Sunflower Broadband, a cable company. When not found working with computers, writing, or spending time with his family, you will likely find him outdoors. Stephen teaches wilderness awareness and living skills.

Robert Love has been a Linux user and hacker since the early days. He is active in--and passionate about--the Linux kernel and GNOME desktop communities. His recent contributions to the Linux kernel include work on the kernel event layer and inotify. GNOME-related contributions include Beagle, GNOME Volume Manager, NetworkManager, and Project Utopia. Currently, Robert works in the Open Source Program Office at Google.

Robert is the author of Linux Kernel Development (SAMS 2005) and the co-author of Linux in a Nutshell (2006 O'Reilly). He is also a Contributing Editor at Linux Journal. He is currently working on a new work for O'Reilly that will be the greatest book ever written, give or take. Robert holds a B.A. in Mathematics and a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of Florida. A proud Gator, Robert was born in South Florida but currently calls home Cambridge, MA.

Arnold Robbins, an Atlanta native, is a professional programmer and technical author. He has worked with Unix systems since 1980, when he was introduced to a PDP-11 running a version of Sixth Edition Unix. He has been a heavy AWK user since 1987, when he became involved with gawk, the GNU project's version of AWK. As a member of the POSIX 1003.2 balloting group, he helped shape the POSIX standard for AWK. He is currently the maintainer of gawk and its documentation. He is also coauthor of the sixth edition of O'Reilly's Learning the vi Editor. Since late 1997, he and his family have been living happily in Israel.


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2229 KB
  • Print Length: 944 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 6 edition (19 Sept. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0093T2G3I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #555,767 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I've just started using Linux (Fedora 7) and I was looking for a book that would help me learn the commands and how to do the more tricky things in Linux. The commands in the book are arranged alphabetically, which is not much good if you do no know the command in the first place i.e. if you want to know how to delete a directory you are going to have to know the 'rm' command before being able to jump to the right page in the book. For beginners this isn't recommended (get the Linux Essential Commands Pocket Guide instead) but if you're intermediate/advanced then this is a good book. I've no doubt that I'll refer back to this book in 3/4 months or so but at the moment I won't be using it much.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a perfect book when you want to start working or work a lot with Linux systems. Comprehensive description of commands is usually followed by an example or two, depending on the complexity or usefulness. All the commands are grouped into chapters, with general ones in one and then more specific for programming, package managers, different shells etc. Newer editions contain some major changes, such as added chapter on revision control, to incorporate ongoing evolution of Linux.
I have one warning though. I own 3rd edition paperback and 6th Kindle. Try to avoid Kindle edition if you can!! It is almost impossible to find a given command with one click - searching returns too many results. Index is totally useless in this case. Some entries have links, when others don't - definitely requires some major improvements. So 5 stars for book in general, but only 2 for Kindle edition.
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Format: Paperback
Being a novice to Linux I did find this interesting, there is a load of information in here.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is really excellent and first-class, putting all you need to know right at your fingertips. Not merely does it have a superb overview of Linux, it also has a concise guide to all the major commands in a Linux distribution. If you run Linux, you will find this book invaluable.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought nearly 10 years ago at a time when I wanted a hard copy of several manuals and server guides, I now favour online and digital resources which are easier to search. No issues with the book for anyone wanting a "real" book.
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Format: Paperback
80% of this book is a collection of printed man-pages, ordered alphabetically, with no major improvements or added value. The only useful informations on this book is the index of commonly used commands, sorted by topic; and a few introductory chapters.

If you prefer reading on paper and have a few bucks to spend, buy this book. Otherwise, stick on the good old man pages; often more accurate, up-to-date, and "grep-able"... And conveniently located on your screen, where you need it the most. Typing man is always faster than getting the book from the bookshelf, open the index and finally find the page.

Believe me, I own the book, I never use it. Internet + man are your best friends.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Had Unix in a nutshell for some years - pages had started to fall out. As I work more with Linux these days, I purchased this book. Its Great - what more can I say
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