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5.0 out of 5 stars
4

on 3 June 2013
Linux in a Nutshell: a Desktop Quick Reference
Ellen Siever
How do you rate this product?
I love it
Linux in a Nutshell: a Desktop Quick Reference
Ellen Siever
How do you rate this product?
I love it
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on 16 July 2000
Not making sense..?
This book is a superb command reference guide but if you try to read it from cover to cover, you will be soporiphic by page 2 and in a coma by page 3..!
This book is NOT an introduction or getting started guide, for that you should get Running Linux by the same publishers.
This book IS probably the best LINUS investment you will ever make. It covers almost every command in good detail, (but you do need to have at least an idea about the command first! ) It is outstanding value for money, but ONLY as a reference.
The book is clearly and logically presented and there is NO waffle or unnecessary explanation, just the commands, what they do and how to use them.
22 people found this helpful
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on 14 March 2000
A must for all those Linux user who know what they want to do, but can't quite remember which command they need to use! When I started my new job, I brought this book along, and within 1 week I had the entire technical department swarming over this book wanting to look up different commands.
4 people found this helpful
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on 28 March 2000
As its title suggests, this is a reference guide to Linux, containing a complete reference of all user, programming, administration and networking commands. The book is split into seventeen chapters each discribing a different aspect of Linux, starting with an overview of Linux. It then proceeds into the reference section, Linux user commands, shells, pattern matching, EMACS editor, VI editor, Ex editor, sed editor, Gawk scripting language, programming, RCS and CVS, Perl 5 Quick Reference, system and network administration, and boot methods. Each chapter starts with a short explanation of its subject, then goes into the commands that are available in a sensible order. Each command is given as much detail as necessary. For example, the copy command is very short with little detail, whereas routed is explained in more detail.
3 people found this helpful
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